Televising Trump's trials : Consider This from NPR Today we're sharing an episode of NPR's podcast Trump's Trials, hosted by Scott Detrow with regular analysis from Domenico Montanaro. This week they're joined by NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson. Each week they'll break down the latest courtroom drama, testimony, and legal maneuverings in the criminal and civil cases facing former President Trump — and talk about what it all means for American democracy.

This week we focus on the January 6th federal election interference case led by special counsel Jack Smith. The case is scheduled to go to trial in March in Washington, D.C., and it might be coming to a TV near you.

Yes, Trump and some media outlets are requesting cameras in the courtroom. We'll talk about how likely that is, how it could impact the case and the campaign, plus some news from a couple of key swing states.

Topics include:
- How televising the trial could help and hurt Trump
- Prosecution and defense strategies for the federal election interference case
- Pro-Trump electors from Wisconsin admit President Biden won the 2020 election
- Pro-Trump electors criminally indicted in Nevada over attempts to overturn Biden's 2020 win

Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.

Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.

Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.

Trump's Trials: Should the Jan 6 trial be televised?

Trump's Trials: Should the Jan 6 trial be televised?

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Seen on a camera screen, former U.S. President Donald Trump arrives to testify during his trial in New York State Supreme Court on November 06, 2023 in New York City. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Seen on a camera screen, former U.S. President Donald Trump arrives to testify during his trial in New York State Supreme Court on November 06, 2023 in New York City.

David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Today we're sharing an episode of NPR's podcast Trump's Trials, hosted by Scott Detrow with regular analysis from Domenico Montanaro. This week they're joined by NPR Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson. Each week they'll break down the latest courtroom drama, testimony, and legal maneuverings in the criminal and civil cases facing former President Trump — and talk about what it all means for American democracy.

This week we focus on the January 6th federal election interference case led by special counsel Jack Smith. The case is scheduled to go to trial in March in Washington, D.C., and it might be coming to a TV near you.

Yes, Trump and some media outlets are requesting cameras in the courtroom. We'll talk about how likely that is, how it could impact the case and the campaign, plus some news from a couple of key swing states.

Topics include:
- How televising the trial could help and hurt Trump
- The Trump team's attempts to delay the trial
- Prosecution and defense strategies for the federal election interference case
- Trump's attempts to invoke presidential immunity
- Pro-Trump electors from Wisconsin admit President Biden won the 2020 election
- Pro-Trump electors criminally indicted in Nevada over attempts to overturn Biden's 2020 win

Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or Spotify for new episodes each Saturday.

Sign up for sponsor-free episodes and support NPR's political journalism at plus.npr.org/trumpstrials.

Email the show at trumpstrials@npr.org.

This episode was produced by Tyler Bartlam and edited by Adam Raney and Steve Drummond. Audio engineering by Kwesi Lee. Our executive producers are Beth Donovan and Sami Yenigun. Eric Marrapodi is NPR's Vice President of News Programming.