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Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will leave her Senate seat on Monday, but when she's sworn into her new office Harris will take a very powerful seat in the chamber. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Harris Will Leave Senate Seat Monday, Set To Return As Tiebreaking Vice President

The vice president-elect will be sworn in on Wednesday by Justice Sonia Sotomayor, both women of color who broke barriers. As vice president, Harris will tip control of the Senate to Democrats.

President Trump speaks to supporters on Jan. 6 before pro-Trump extremists launched a violent attack on the U.S. Capitol. Trump's role in encouraging the siege over false claims of election fraud has hardened divisions in the party as he leaves office. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Republicans Wonder How, And If, They Can Pull The Party Back Together

President Trump leaves fault lines in the GOP after the Capitol insurrection and his second impeachment, on top of the party having lost the White House, House and Senate on his watch.

Republicans Wonder How, And If, They Can Pull The Party Back Together

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Gab was founded in 2016 as an almost anti-Twitter. The platform embraces far-right and other extremist provocateurs, including Milo Yiannopoulos and Alex Jones, who have been banned from Facebook and Twitter over incendiary posts. Rafael Henrique/SIPA Images/Reuters hide caption

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Rafael Henrique/SIPA Images/Reuters

Social Media Site Gab Is Surging, Even As Critics Blame It For Capitol Violence

As federal investigators begin to launch criminal cases against some of the perpetrators of the violence, a growing chorus of advocates and lawmakers say tech companies bear some responsibility, too.

Social Media Site Gab Is Surging, Even As Critics Blame It For Capitol Violence

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People line up on Thursday for the first day of Clark County's pilot COVID-19 vaccination program at Cashman Center in Las Vegas. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

COVID-19 Supply Deal Lets Vaccine Maker Earmark Doses For Employees And Their Families

Emergent BioSolutions is under contract with Operation Warp Speed to make COVID-19 vaccines, but the terms could allow employees and their families to get vaccinated ahead of schedule.

COVID-19 Supply Deal Lets Vaccine Maker Earmark Doses For Employees And Their Families

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On March 1, 1954, Puerto Rican nationalists from New York carried out a shooting attack on Capitol Hill, in Washington, D.C. Front row, from left to right: Irving Flores Rodriguez, Rafael Cancel Miranda, Lolita Lebron and Andres Figueroa Cordero, stand in a police lineup following their arrests. AP hide caption

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AP

Listen: Eyewitnesses Recount The 1954 Shooting Attack On The U.S. Capitol

There's been more than one attack on the U.S. Capitol. More than 60 years ago, four Puerto Rican nationalists opened fire on lawmakers debating on the House floor.

Listen: Eyewitnesses Recount The 1954 Shooting Attack On The U.S. Capitol

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A Stop The Steal sign is posted inside of U.S. Capitol after a pro-Trump mob broke into the building on Jan. 6. Trump supporters had gathered in the nation's capital to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Can The Forces Unleashed By Trump's Big Election Lie Be Undone?

President-elect Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress have called Trump's insistence that the election was rigged the "big lie." The term has roots in Nazi Germany and echoes throughout fascist states.

Can The Forces Unleashed By Trump's Big Election Lie Be Undone?

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A temporary six-foot high chain link fence surrounds California's state Capitol because of concerns over the potential for civil unrest. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Statehouses Brace For Potential Violence As Biden's Inauguration Approaches

Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, states are fortifying their legislative buildings and calling in the National Guard in anticipation of potentially violent protests.

A member of the Virginia National Guard stands outside the razor wire fencing surrounding the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Up to 25,000 troops are expected by Inauguration Day. Liz Lynch/Getty Images hide caption

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Liz Lynch/Getty Images

Up To 25,000 Troops Descend On Washington For Biden's Inauguration

Up to 25,000 National Guard troops are expected to be in place by Wednesday, as the nation prepares for an inauguration unlike any in the country's history.

Convinced the election was stolen, thousands of Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6 as Congress counts and certifies the Electoral College vote. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

What We Know So Far: A Timeline Of Security Response At The Capitol On Jan. 6

Despite days of widespread incitement on social media in advance of the insurrection encouraging extremist Trump supporters to assault the U.S. Capitol, law enforcement was unprepared and overwhelmed.

Adán Medrano, chef and food writer, savors a beef cheek taco at Vera's Backyard Bar-B-Que in Texas' Rio Grande Valley. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

'Where The Magic Happens': Following A Tasty Taco Trail In South Texas

In Brownsville, Texas, two Mexican restaurants are pushing the envelope of what a corn tortilla can envelop, and an award-winning cafe cooks barbacoa the old-fashioned way.

'Where The Magic Happens': Following A Tasty Taco Trail In South Texas

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Ugandan electoral commission officials count ballot papers after the polls closed at a polling station in Kampala on Thursday. Sumy Sadurni/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sumy Sadurni/AFP via Getty Images

Uganda Election: President Yoweri Museveni Declared Winner As Bobi Wine Alleges Fraud

Uganda's electoral commission says Museveni has won a sixth term in office, but Wine is saying the election was rigged, and the top U.S. diplomat to Africa is calling the vote "fundamentally flawed."

This 2015 photo provided by Shawn Nolan Chief, Capital Habeas Unit Community Federal Defender Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, shows Dustin Higgs at the federal prison in Terre Haute, Ind. Federal Bureau of Prisons/Community Federal Defender Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania via AP/AP hide caption

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Federal Bureau of Prisons/Community Federal Defender Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania via AP/AP

U.S. Executes Dustin Higgs In 13th And Final Execution Under Trump Administration

Higgs had been sentenced to death for the 1996 killings of three women. His lawyers had tried to argue that his diagnosis of COVID-19 would make death by lethal injection "cruel."

Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will leave his post next week after heading the federal public health agency during a pandemic that, he said, has yet to see its darkest days. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Outgoing CDC Director Warns Of Pandemic's Peak: 'We're About To Be In The Worst Of It'

A year into the COVID-19 crisis, Dr. Robert Redfield stands by his federal health agency's response to the pandemic despite an early "learning curve" and contradictory messaging from President Trump.

Outgoing CDC Director Warns Of Pandemic's Peak: 'We're About To Be In The Worst Of It'

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Music journalist Betto Arcos gathers his favorite reports from prolific career in Music Stories from the Cosmic Barrio. Erik Esparza/Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Erik Esparza/Courtesy of the author

Betto Arcos Shares The Power Of Community In 'Music Stories From The Cosmic Barrio'

In his new book, the globetrotting journalist and longtime NPR contributor collects some of his favorite reports from musicians and music communities around the world.

Betto Arcos Shares The Power Of Community In 'Music Stories From The Cosmic Barrio'

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R&B singer-songwriter Jazmine Sullivan released Heaux Tales on Jan. 8. Myesha Evon Gardner/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Myesha Evon Gardner/Courtesy of the artist

Jazmine Sullivan On 'Heaux Tales,' Dirty Laundry And The Value Of Taking Breaks

The artist speaks with Michel Martin about her acclaimed, ambitious new album and why she wanted to bring the conversations women have amongst themselves to light.

Jazmine Sullivan On 'Heaux Tales,' Dirty Laundry And The Value Of Taking Breaks

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"It's really exciting to see choreographers nowadays blurring the lines of gender binary and sexuality," says Ashton Edwards. Ashton Edwards hide caption

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Ashton Edwards

With A Leap Across Gender Norms, A Rising Ballet Star Looks To Rewrite Rules Of Dance

Ballet student Ashton Edwards is the rare dancer who is expanding his repertoire and his craft by training to dance in en pointe shoes, once worn only by women.

With A Leap Across Gender Norms, A Rising Ballet Star Looks To Rewrite Rules Of Dance

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A medical worker inoculates a colleague with a COVID-19 vaccine at the Nil Ratan Sircar Medical College and Hospital in Kolkata on Saturday. Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dibyangshu Sarkar/AFP via Getty Images

India Kicks Off A Massive COVID-19 Vaccination Drive

Cheers erupted in hospital wards across the country as a first group of nurses and sanitation workers rolled up their sleeves and got vaccinated. India aims to inoculate 300 million by July.

India Kicks Off A Massive COVID-19 Vaccination Drive

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People lined up to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at a mass vaccination site in Disneyland's parking lot in Anaheim, Calif. on Jan. 13. The state says all residents 65 or older are now eligible to receive the vaccine. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Moral Tragedy Looms In Early Chaos Of U.S. COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution

As states suddenly expand the categories of people eligible for the first scarce shipments of vaccine, who will be watching to make sure those hit hardest by the pandemic aren't left behind?

A coronavirus variant that is thought to be more contagious was detected in the United States in Elbert County, Colo., not far from this testing site in Parker, Colo. The variant has been detected in several U.S. states. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

CDC Warns New U.K. Coronavirus Variant Is Spreading Fast In The U.S.

It appears to be 50% more infectious, and researchers predict the new coronavirus variant could start to dominate in the U.S. by March. The time to prepare is now, they say.

"People will not be subject to age or disability discrimination when the going gets tough," Roger Severino, the director of the Office of Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services, told NPR. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

HHS Civil Rights Office Tackles Health Care Discrimination Of People With Disabilities

New actions from the Office For Civil Rights at the Department of Health and Human Services aim to fight discrimination against people with disabilities who have COVID-19, like being denied treatment.

The federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Ind., is pictured in August 2020. All federal prisons in the United States have been placed on lockdown. Law enforcement agencies are taking measures in the aftermath of Jan. 6 insurrection and over concerns of more violence. Michael Conroy/AP hide caption

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Michael Conroy/AP

Federal Prisons On Lockdown Because Of 'Current Events'

The Bureau of Prisons said Saturday it was securing all of its facilities as a precautionary measure. The agency did not specify the length of the lockdown, but said it was a temporary measure.

Steven Sund was chief of U.S. Capitol Police during the Jan. 6 insurrection. He resigned after the attack but defends his agency's preparations. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Former Capitol Police Chief: 'I've Never Seen Anything Like' Jan. 6 Attack

In an NPR interview, Steven Sund says U.S. Capitol Police expected some additional violence the day of the insurrection but he says nothing could have prepared them for what actually happened.

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