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A bookstore in England has sold a children's book that has been on the shelf for 27 years. The bookstore's tweet about the sale has since gone viral. Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images hide caption

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Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images

Bookstore's Tweet On The Sale Of A Children's Book After 27 Years, Goes Viral

Broadhursts Bookshop in Southport, England, sold the book about William the Conqueror that had sat on the shelf for decades. The store's tweet about the sale has inspired thousands of replies.

"Honk if you love equality," reads the side of the bus lawmakers, like Virginia Del. Jennifer Caroll Foy (pictured speaking), have taken around the state to promote ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment. Whittney Evans/WCVE hide caption

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Whittney Evans/WCVE

Virginia Could Be The State To Give Women Equal Rights Nationwide

WCVE

A bipartisan coalition of lawmakers in Virginia is working to make the state the 38th and final state to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Virginia Could Be The State To Give Women Equal Rights Nationwide

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Last week J.D. Kleopfer, a state herpetologist, announced the death of a two-headed copperhead snake in Northern Virginia on social media. He said it was a discovery that few of his colleagues have seen. J.D. Kleopfer/Virginia Dept. of Game and Inland Fisheries hide caption

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J.D. Kleopfer/Virginia Dept. of Game and Inland Fisheries

An 'Exceptionally Rare' 2-Headed Snake Found In Virginia Has Died

Two-headed snakes don't live very long in the wild, so when one was found in a Northern Virginia yard, the discovery got the attention of scientists and social media alike.

An image shows the paintings stolen from Rotterdam's Kunsthal in 2012 — including Picasso's Tête d'Arlequin at bottom right. Two Dutch citizens claim to have found the missing Picasso work, Romanian prosecutors said on Sunday. Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Mihailescu/AFP/Getty Images

Six Years After Museum Heist, Missing Picasso Possibly Found In Romania

Thieves entered the Netherlands' Kunsthal in 2012 and made off with seven paintings, allegedly later burned in an oven by the ringleader's mother. Now the story has taken another strange turn.

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange could soon be facing criminal charges from the Department of Justice, according to language discovered in an unrelated court document by terrorism researcher Seamus Hughes. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

How A 'Court Records Nerd' Discovered The Government May Be Charging Julian Assange

One minute, Seamus Hughes was reading the book Dragons Love Tacos to his son. The next minute, he stumbled on what could be one of the most closely guarded secrets within the U.S. government.

How A 'Court Records Nerd' Discovered The Government May Be Charging Julian Assange

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A man stands in the middle of the street at the Seminole Springs mobile home park in Malibu Lake after the Woolsey Fire roared through the community on November 10, 2018 in Malibu, California. Wally Skalij/Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Wally Skalij/Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Supercomputers Assist Firefighters As Wildfires Spread In California

KQED

New technology builds on existing models and adds in the growing amount of real-time data available from NASA satellites, weather stations, field cameras and aerial reconnaissance flights.

Supercomputers Assist Firefighters As Wildfires Spread In California

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In a new segment, "Help, I'm Hosting," on this week's Weekend Edition with Lulu Garcia-Navarro on NPR, Ted Allen offers advice for people hosting family and friends over the holidays. Monica Schipper/Getty Images for NYCWFF hide caption

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Monica Schipper/Getty Images for NYCWFF

'Help, I'm Hosting': Ted Allen Dishes On Vegetarian Thanksgiving, Cooking Wild Turkey

From menu planning to dealing with the unexpected, NPR's Weekend Edition's new holiday series offers advice to those hosting friends and family this holiday season, so it's a stress-free time for all.

'Help, I'm Hosting': Ted Allen Dishes On Vegetarian Thanksgiving, Cooking Wild Turkey

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Experts agree that the image on the left urges toilet users to flush toilet paper in the bowl rather than toss it in a trash can. As for the image on the right, it appears to offer a double warning: Don't stand on the seat, don't relieve yourself in the upper tank. Jennifer Wood/Courtesy of Doug Lansky hide caption

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Jennifer Wood/Courtesy of Doug Lansky

Oh, The Places You'll Go: Toilet Signs Try To Help

Using toilets is not always intuitive. That's when a sign or two can be helpful — and sometimes hilarity-inducing.

Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was last seen visiting Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images

Saudis Deny Reported CIA Conclusion That Crown Prince Ordered Khashoggi Assassination

The CIA found "nothing of this scale, an operation like this, could possibly have happened without the crown prince knowing about it and authorizing it," The Washington Post's Shane Harris told NPR.

President Trump said Saturday that he is not considering extraditing a dissident whom Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accuses of involvement in a failed coup. Tatyana Zenkovich/AP hide caption

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Tatyana Zenkovich/AP

Trump Says Extraditing Turkish Cleric Fethullah Gulen Is 'Not Under Consideration'

News outlets had reported that the White House was looking to placate Turkey to ease pressure on the Saudis, after journalist Jamal Khashoggi was killed at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul.

School shootings have led to a boon to the business of security technology. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Inside The Business Of School Security To Stop Active Shooters

Schools in the U.S. have spent billions of dollars on systems to stop shooters. Washington Post reporter John Woodrow Cox says it's not clear how effective these measures can be.

Inside The Business Of School Security To Stop Active Shooters

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A Utah County election worker verifies signatures on mail-in ballots for the midterm elections on Nov. 6. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Sign Here: Why Elections Officials Struggle To Match Voters' Signatures

Officials are still counting ballots from the midterm elections in several states — in part because of the signature verification process. But signatures change over time, especially young people's.

Sign Here: Why Elections Officials Struggle To Match Voters' Signatures

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President Trump makes remarks prior to signing a bill in the Oval Office of the White House on Friday. The president also took questions from reporters. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

The Russia Investigations: Trump Says His Answers For Mueller Are Done. Now What?

The president told reporters that he wrote the answers to questions from the special counsel and that he did so "very easily." He also said he suspected some were designed to be a "perjury trap."

Sara Wong for NPR

Migrant Kids Survive Hardship To Reunite With Parents. Then What?

Most children moving to the U.S. from Central America come without adults, hoping to join parents or family already living in the U.S. To succeed, psychologists say, these families need support.

Migrant Kids Survive Hardship To Reunite With Parents. Then What?

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A firefighter searches a trailer park destroyed in the Camp Fire on Friday Paradise, Calif. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

California Offers Safe Space For Firefighters To Work Through Stress And Trauma

KPCC

With wildfires now a year-round problem in California, officials are adding emotional support to the services they provide to firefighters in the field.

California Offers Safe Space For Firefighters To Work Through Stress And Trauma

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Contemporary reprints of original Green Books from 1940 (front) and 1954. Karen Grigsby Bates hide caption

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Karen Grigsby Bates

The Green Book: Celebrating 'The Bible of Black Travel'

A family vacation was like planning a military campaign. In the Jim Crow era, this guide book was essential for traveling safely.

The Green Book: Celebrating 'The Bible of Black Travel'

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Relatives of crew members on board the ARA San Juan submarine wait outside the navy base in Mar del Plata. Argentina's navy announced early Saturday the missing submarine has been located in a deep ravine in the Atlantic Ocean. Federico Cosso/AP hide caption

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Federico Cosso/AP

Missing Argentine Submarine Found In Deep Ocean Ravine

The submarine had 44 crew members when it lost contact with Argentina's military. Its disappearance has prompted protests by family members of those on board.

Francescangeli says boys sometimes work long hours and are often tasked with pushing carts to move rocks out of the mines. "Being a child in these places is really hard," he says. "If they have some time to spend in a free way, they like to be children. But their life doesn't permit them to be children so often." Simone Francescangeli hide caption

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Simone Francescangeli

PHOTOS: Dust And Danger For Adults — And Kids — In Bolivia's Mines

When photographer Simone Francescangeli took pictures of the miners, he was struck by the dangerous environment — and the number of children he saw working in the mines.

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