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The Boston Globe's logo as seen through the windows across from the new location of the Globe in Boston. The paper's editors coordinated a campaign defending a free press in editorials. Joseph Prezioso/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP/Getty Images

Hundreds Of Newspapers Denounce Trump's Attacks On Media In Coordinated Editorials

Staff members of the editorial page at The Boston Globe coordinated a campaign for hundreds of papers to simultaneously publish opinion pieces defending the role of the free press.

This undated photo provided by the U.S. Attorney's Office shows Omar Ameen, who had been living in California as a refugee and was arrested Wednesday on a warrant alleging he killed an Iraqi policeman while fighting for the Islamic State. U.S. Attorney's Office via AP hide caption

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U.S. Attorney's Office via AP

Iraqi Refugee In U.S. Accused Of Committing Murder For ISIS

Federal prosecutors say Omar Ameen lied about his terrorism ties to enter the U.S. as a refugee. He is wanted in Iraq over the killing of a police officer in 2014.

Baker Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cakeshop, manages his shop in Lakewood, Colo., on Wednesday. He's suing state officials in a case involving his refusal to make a case celebrating gender transition. Hyoung Chang/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Hyoung Chang/Denver Post via Getty Images

Colorado Baker Sues State Again, After Refusing To Make Cake For Transgender Woman

Jack Phillips, who prevailed in a Supreme Court case about his refusal to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple, is suing Colorado in a case involving a cake celebrating gender transition.

A police officer speaks to a man walking on New Haven Green, on Wednesday, in New Haven, Conn. More than 70 people fell ill from suspected drug overdoses on the green and were taken to local hospitals. Bill Sikes/AP hide caption

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Bill Sikes/AP

Dozens Overdose In Connecticut Park On Tainted Synthetic Marijuana

More than 70 people fell ill in or around a historic park in New Haven, near the Yale University campus. Police believe the synthetic cannabinoid K2 laced with fentanyl caused the rash of overdoses.

Patient Aaron Reid receives (CAR) T-cell therapy at the NIH in Bethesda, MD. The process took five minutes to complete. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Pearl Mak/NPR

Scientists Race To Improve 'Living Drugs' To Fight Cancer

Researchers are working on better ways to teach patients' immune systems to root out and kill malignant cells. A promising approach involves cells that attack cancer two ways at one time.

Scientists Race To Improve 'Living Drugs' To Fight Cancer

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Eliot Lee Hazel/Courtesy of the artist

Death Cab For Cutie Is Thankful For 20 Years Of Memories

XPN

"We're still considered by virtually everybody as an indie band," group member Ben Gibbard says.

Death Cab For Cutie On World Cafe

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Vietnamese national Doan Thi Huong (C) escorted by armed Malaysian police leaves after facing trial at the Shah Alam High Court, outside Kuala Lumpur on Thursday. Manan Vatsyayana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Manan Vatsyayana/AFP/Getty Images

Judge Says A 'Well-Planned Conspiracy' In Kim Jong Nam's Death

Two women who are accused of an attack on the brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un using a nerve agent are to remain in custody after a judge said there was enough evidence of a "conspiracy."

Workplace civil rights law prohibits discrimination against workers 40 and older. Yet worker advocates say recruiters sometimes exclude older workers by narrowing how and where they look for candidates. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Are Job Ads Targeting Young Workers Breaking The Law?

Many employers use online ads to attract younger workers. Several pending lawsuits are testing whether employers using highly targeted recruitment ads can be sued for age discrimination.

Some of the cattle grazing on the Persson Ranch are tracked using blockchain technology, which may allow consumers to know where their meat comes from and more. Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio

Where's The Beef? Wyoming Ranchers Bet On Blockchain To Track It

Wyoming Public Radio

By tagging cattle and updating their data about their free-range, grass-fed quality of life using blockchain, some ranchers are hoping to solve paper tracking pitfalls and sell their beef for more.

Where's The Beef? Wyoming Ranchers Bet On Blockchain To Track It

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Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., reacts while speaking with an attendee at the West Fargo Police Department's Night to Unite event Aug. 7. Heitkamp is one of 10 Senate Democrats facing re-election in November in states President Donald Trump won in 2016. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Heitkamp Stresses Independence As Path To Re-Election In Trump Country

Republicans say North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp's emphasis on her points of agreement with Trump won't wash away the fact that she's a Democrat in a solidly red state.

Beyoncé performed "Lift Every Voice and Sing" during her set at the 2018 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in April. Larry Busacca/Getty Images for Coachella hide caption

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Larry Busacca/Getty Images for Coachella

Till Victory Is Won: The Staying Power Of 'Lift Every Voice And Sing'

Beyonce sang it at Coachella. Kim Weston sang it at Wattstax. The song often called the "black national anthem" is still with us — in part because the struggle it describes never went away.

Till Victory Is Won: The Staying Power Of 'Lift Every Voice And Sing'

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Edith Leoso, the historian for the Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa Tribe, explains the area's flood history to Nicholas Pinter of the University of California, Davis. Joe Proudman/UC Davis hide caption

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Joe Proudman/UC Davis

Wisconsin Reservation Offers A Climate Success Story And A Warning

Climate change is causing more severe flooding around the country, and a disproportionate number of Native American communities are on the front lines.

Wisconsin Reservation Offers A Climate Success Story And A Warning

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