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Tina Kotek speaks during Day 1 of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 25, 2016. On Tuesday, she won Oregon's gubernatorial Democratic primary. If she wins in November, Kotek will be the nation's first openly lesbian governor. ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

Tina Kotek's win comes amid a wave of LGBTQ candidates running for office

Kotek won her state's Democratic primary on Tuesday. If she wins the general election later this year, she will become the country's first openly lesbian governor.

Russian army Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, is seen behind glass during a court hearing in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Wednesday. Shishimarin pleaded guilty to killing an unarmed Ukrainian civilian. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

In a war crimes trial, a Russian soldier pleads guilty to killing a Ukrainian civilian

Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin, 21, is facing the first war crimes trial since Russia invaded Ukraine. The Russian soldier could get life in prison for shooting a 62-year-old unarmed civilian in the head.

Ukrainian Col. Roman Kostenko stands in a redbrick farmhouse with a gaping hole in one of the walls. This is where Kostenko taught soldiers how to set explosives. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A member of Ukraine's parliament now trains a recon and sabotage unit to fight Russia

Col. Roman Kostenko, a Ukrainian lawmaker, has built a reconnaissance and sabotage team to target Russian forces. His ultimate goal: free his family village from Russian control.

A member of Ukraine's parliament now trains a recon and sabotage unit to fight Russia

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Eric Clapton performs at Eric Clapton's Crossroads Guitar Festival in New York on April 14, 2013. Clapton, a critic of coronavirus vaccines and pandemic restrictions, has tested positive for COVID-19 and canceled two upcoming European gigs. Charles Sykes/Invision/AP hide caption

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Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

Eric Clapton cancels shows after testing positive for COVID-19

The 77-year-old guitar legend has been a critic of coronavirus vaccines and pandemic restrictions. He has tested positive for COVID-19 and canceled two upcoming European gigs.

Dr. Denis Mukwege is a gynecologist, Nobel Peace Prize winner and advocate against sexual violence in conflict zones like his homeland, the Democratic Republic of Congo. He is now speaking out against the reports of rapes committed by Russian soldiers during the war in Ukraine. Fabian Sommer/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabian Sommer/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Fighting the horror of wartime rape, Nobel Prize Peace winner won't give up hope

Dr. Denis Mukwege has spent decades treating women who have been raped in his homeland of the Democratic Republic of Congo. He's calling on the world to take action for women in Ukraine.

Former Minneapolis police officer Thomas Lane pleaded guilty Wednesday to a state charge of aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter in the killing of George Floyd. Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP

A former Minneapolis cop pleads guilty to manslaughter in George Floyd killing

Thomas Lane pleaded guilty to a state charge of aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter in George Floyd's killing. The state is recommending a sentence of three years in prison.

Tony Johnson sits on his bed with his dog, Dash, in the one-room home he shares with his wife, Karen Johnson, in a care facility in Burlington, Wash. on April 13, 2022. Johnson was one of the first people to get COVID-19 in Washington state in April of 2020. His left leg had to be amputated due to lack of wound care after he developed blood clots in his feet while on a ventilator. Lynn Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Johnson for NPR

For two years, this Washington island has grappled with the long reach of COVID

The virus hit Whidbey Island early in 2020, and photojournalist Lynn Johnson was there. A million deaths later, we return to see how the pandemic has subtly but indelibly altered life there forever.

Protesters carry images of disappeared people on Mother's Day during an annual march by the mothers of missing people to demand the Mexican government step up efforts to locate the missing and prevent further disappearances, in Mexico City, May 10. Eduardo Verdugo/AP hide caption

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Eduardo Verdugo/AP

Mexico's official list of missing people has passed 100,000, with few cases solved

Mexico marks a grim milestone: The number of people officially listed as disappeared now exceeds 100,000. Many are victims of drug cartels, journalists, human rights advocates and Indigenous people.

Mexico's official list of missing people passes 100,000, with few cases ever solved

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Urvashi Vaid, then-executive director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, protests at then-President George H.W. Bush's address on AIDS in March 1990 in Arlington, Virginia. The pioneering LGBTQ activist and attorney died last week at age 63. Dennis Cook/Associated Press hide caption

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Dennis Cook/Associated Press

Remembering Urvashi Vaid, an LGBTQ activist who spent decades fighting for equality

Colleagues, friends and admirers are paying tribute to Vaid, the pioneering attorney and organizer who died at age 63 on Friday. She worked for the ACLU and National LGBTQ Task Force, among others.

Players on the U.S Women's National Team celebrate their victory in the penalty shootout over the Netherlands in the Women's Quarter Final match of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images hide caption

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Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

The U.S. men's and women's soccer teams will be paid equally under a new deal

The new collective bargaining agreement will run through 2028 and will also include the "equalization" of World Cup prize money, the organization announced.

A mother helps her malnourished son stand after he collapsed near their hut in the village of Lomoputh in northern Kenya on Thursday. A severe drought and spiking food prices are causing a humanitarian emergency in the Horn of Africa. Brian Inganga/AP hide caption

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Brian Inganga/AP

Drought and soaring food prices from Ukraine war leave millions in Africa starving

A report finds 23 million people are experiencing extreme hunger in Ethiopia, Somalia and Kenya, which face their worst drought in 40 years. Food prices hit record highs after Russia attacked Ukraine.

From left: Tomek Mądry, Basia Olszewska and Lilia Nguyen all say the war in Ukraine has made them reassess their own lives in Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

How the war in Ukraine 'changed everything' for a generation of young Poles

Lilia Nguyen's perception of everything around her changed when she went to the border to help Ukrainian refugees shortly after the war began. The change has been felt by other young Poles.

How the war in Ukraine 'changed everything' for a generation of young Poles

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A mural of George Floyd at the intersection where he was murdered in Minneapolis, Minn. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Many know how George Floyd died. A new biography reveals how he lived

NPR's Adrian Florido talks with Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa about their new book, His Name is George Floyd: One Man's Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice.

Many know how George Floyd died. A new biography reveals how he lived

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Dinesh D'Souza, seen here at a premiere of one of his films in 2018, has released a new film alleging voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election. Fact checkers have cast doubt on many of the film's claims. Shannon Finney/Getty Images hide caption

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Shannon Finney/Getty Images

A pro-Trump film suggests its data are so accurate, it solved a murder. That's false

Conservative commentator Dinesh D'Souza's new film "2,000 Mules" alleges massive voter fraud in the 2020 election, but NPR has found the filmmakers made multiple misleading and false claims.

Andrew "Skip" Carter was a radio engineer and trailblazer who tried for years to break through into broadcast, and finally got KPRS AM off the ground in 1950. Carter Broadcast Group hide caption

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Carter Broadcast Group

A People's History of Kansas City

Hot 103 Jamz! America's longest-running Black-owned radio station

KCUR 89.3

The station Andrew "Skip" Carter founded in 1950, KPRS AM, has grown to become America's oldest Black-owned radio company in an era when Black broadcast ownership represents a sliver of the market and is on the decline.

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