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Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg waves aboard the catamaran La Vagabonde as she sets sail for Europe from Hampton, Va., on Wednesday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Greta Thunberg Sets Sail For Home — And The U.N. Climate Conference

When the next round of climate talks was suddenly moved to Europe, the young activist needed to hitch a ride back across the Atlantic. And she had a message for the U.S. as she waved farewell.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria — rod-shaped bacteria in this tinted, scanning electron microscope image — are found in soil, water and as normal flora in the human intestine. But they can cause serious wound, lung, skin and urinary tract infections, and many pseudomonas strains are drug-resistant. Science Photo Library/Science Source hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Science Source

With Few New Drugs To Treat Antibiotic Resistance, How Best To Deploy Them?

Infection specialists debate whether it's better to aim all their strongest antibiotics at once at multi-resistant germs, or save the most innovative drugs for use only as a last result.

How Best To Use The Few New Drugs To Treat Antibiotic-Resistant Germs?

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The Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday on the DACA program, which covers 700,000 young people. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Supreme Court May Side With Trump On 'DREAMers'

At issue is the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which granted temporary protection from deportation to roughly 700,000 young people.

Supreme Court May Side With Trump On 'DREAMers'

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House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., answers questions regarding the public impeachment hearings set to begin on Wednesday. Schiff has been the face of the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Mhari Shaw/NPR hide caption

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Mhari Shaw/NPR

Rep. Adam Schiff: Trump's Potentially Impeachable Offenses Include Bribery

The House Intelligence Committee chairman said bribery is a "breach of the public trust in a way where you're offering official acts for some personal or political reason, not in the nation's interest."

Rep. Adam Schiff: Trump's Potentially Impeachable Offenses Include Bribery

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Let's Play Ball! Share Your Sports-Inspired Poems

NPR's Rachel Martin and poet-in-residence Kwame Alexander want to read your poems about sports. You can use sport as a metaphor for our lives — or simply write about the game or team you love.

Let's Play Ball! Share Your Sports-Inspired Poems

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"The profession we love has been taken over," psychiatrist and novelist Samuel Shem tells NPR, "with us sitting there in front of screens all day, doing data entry in a computer factory." Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Novelist Doctor Skewers Corporate Medicine In 'Man's 4th Best Hospital'

Samuel Shem's 1978 novel, The House of God, was a sardonic look at U.S. medicine through a young doctor's eyes. Shem's new fiction checks in with the same crew in the age of medicine by smartphone.

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Hungry, Hungry Hippocampus: The Psychology Of How We Eat

Anyone who's tried (and failed) to follow a diet knows that food is more than fuel. This week, we revisit our 2018 episode about the psychology behind what we eat, what we spit out, and when we come back for more.

Hungry, Hungry Hippocampus: The Psychology Of How We Eat

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The Truth About Carbs And Calories

Carbs get a bad rap. Here's the science behind why eating too much starch isn't good for you — and smart tips to integrate more slow carbs into your diet.

The Truth About Carbs And Calories

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An attendee during the TomorrowWorld Electronic Music Festival on September 29, 2013 in Chattahoochee Hills, Georgia. Inclement weather forced the event to close itself off. "Thousands of exhausted kids, unprepared for the conditions, were stranded." Christopher Polk/Getty Images hide caption

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The Mainstreaming Of EDM And The Precipitous Drop That Followed

The culture of electronic dance music has long been seen as a safe space for the marginalized, but over the past decade it took a sharp turn towards the mainstream.

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"Future You" is a monthly video series exploring how today's emerging science and technology could change what it means to be human by the year 2050 with NPR correspondent, Elise Hu.

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