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An entrance to a Foxconn workers' dormitory. China's factories normally ramp up production right after the Lunar New Year, but few workers have returned so far this year. Amy Cheng/NPR hide caption

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Amy Cheng/NPR

The Wide-Ranging Ways In Which The Coronavirus Is Hurting Global Business

Some factories are beginning to reopen, but labor shortages continue. In a recent poll of U.S. companies by Shanghai's American Chamber of Commerce, 78% said they lack staff to resume full production.

The Wide-Ranging Ways In Which The Coronavirus Is Hurting Global Business

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Harvard University professor Charles Lieber is surrounded by reporters as he leaves the Moakley Federal Courthouse in Boston, Thursday, Jan. 30, 2020. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Harvard Professor's Arrest Raises Questions About Scientific Openness

Harvard chemist Charles Lieber was arrested in January for allegedly lying about funding he received from China. Some say the case points to larger issues around scientific collaboration in an era of geopolitical rivalry.

Harvard Professor's Arrest Raises Questions About Scientific Openness

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Nashville General Hospital decided a few years ago that the payoff from suing poor patients over medical bills isn't worth the cost of litigation. But until very recently, the separate company that runs the emergency department for the public hospital and others around the U.S. was continuing to haul patients who couldn't pay into court. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

It's Not Just Hospitals That Are Quick To Sue Patients Who Can't Pay

WPLN

The firm that staffed the emergency room with doctors at Nashville General Hospital was taking more patients to court for unpaid medical bills than any other hospital or practice in the city.

It's Not Just Hospitals That Are Quick To Sue Patients Who Can't Pay

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Nashville General Hospital decided a few years ago that the payoff from suing poor patients over medical bills isn't worth the cost of litigation. But until very recently, the separate company that runs the emergency department for the public hospital and others around the U.S. was continuing to haul patients who couldn't pay into court. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

Big Firm That Staffs ERs At Public Hospitals Has Been Suing Poor Patients

WPLN

The firm that staffed the emergency room with doctors at Nashville General Hospital was taking more patients to court for unpaid medical bills than any other hospital or practice in the city.

It's Not Just Hospitals That Are Quick To Sue Patients Who Can't Pay

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Just five books have been named finalists for the 2020 Aspen Words Literary Prize: Patsy, by Nicole Dennis-Benn; Lost Children Archive, by Valeria Luiselli; Lot, by Bryan Washington; Opioid, Indiana, by Brian Allen Carr; and The Beekeeper of Aleppo, by Christy Lefteri. Courtesy of the Aspen Words Literary Prize hide caption

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Courtesy of the Aspen Words Literary Prize

5 Finalists Still Have A Chance At Aspen Words Literary Prize

The annual award, doled out in partnership with NPR, honors fiction that doesn't shy from grappling with thorny social issues. Just one of the five books remaining will win $35,000 in April.

Organizers of the Homeless Connect say the event outgrew its old space at the Salvation Army and had to be moved to the city's large downtown convention center. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

To Combat Homelessness, Spokane Is Starting To Put Relationships Before Punishments

America's worsening homelessness crisis can feel like an intractable problem. But Spokane, Wash., may be having some early success with new tactics to help its most vulnerable.

To Combat Homelessness, Spokane Is Starting To Put Relationships Before Punishments

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A masked paramilitary policeman stands guard alone at a deserted Tiananmen Gate in Beijing following the coronavirus outbreak. China on Wednesday said it has revoked the press credentials of three U.S. reporters over a headline for an opinion column it deems racist and slanderous. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

China Expels 3 'Wall Street Journal' Reporters, Citing 'Racist' Headline

The move comes a day after the U.S. State Department designated five Chinese state media outlets as foreign government missions, thus treating them as extensions of Beijing.

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich departs his Chicago home in 2012. On Tuesday, Trump commuted the 14-year sentence of Blagojevich, who has been serving a prison term after being convicted of corruption charges. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich Released Following Trump's Commutation

On Tuesday night, Blagojevich walked free from a federal prison four years before he was scheduled to be released. He is among 11 people who received clemency, the White House says.

Top: Keziah Therchik (left) and Angel Charles take a selfie before performing Yup'ik dancing in Toksook Bay. Left: Dora Nicholai (in pink) dances at a community center, where portraits of the community's elders hang on a wall. Right: Women show Yup'ik dance fans. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

'We Are Part Of The United States': The 1st People Counted For The 2020 Census

Weeks before the 2020 census rolls out to the rest of the U.S., the head count has already wrapped up in Toksook Bay, a fishing village in southwest Alaska that's home to the Nunakauyarmiut Tribe.

Clockwise from upper left: Brian and Roger Eno, Jon Hopkins, Niklas Paschburg, Skylar Gudasz Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

Breathe Deeply: Music To Quiet The Mind And Inspire

We premiere a new song from Roger and Brian Eno, plus the ambient sounds of Jon Hopkins, Skylar Gudasz and more artists who offer a soothing mix to slow the blood, calm the nerves and quiet the mind.

Breathe Deeply: Music To Quiet The Mind And Inspire

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Checking for signs of COVID-19, a medical worker in a protective suit checks the temperatures of people who were on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship as they fly on a chartered evacuation plane from Japan to Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. Philip and Gay Courter/via Reuters hide caption

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Philip and Gay Courter/via Reuters

Coronavirus Update: 346 Americans Emerge From Quarantine At California Military Bases

"It is important to know that these people being released from quarantine pose no health risk to the surrounding community," a CDC press officer said in a statement to NPR.

David Alan Grier as Sergeant Vernon C. Waters, Blair Underwood as Captain Richard Davenport and Billy Eugene Jones as Private James Wilkie in A Soldier's Play. Joan Marcus hide caption

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Joan Marcus

After 40 Years, 'A Soldier's Play' Finally Marches Onto Broadway

A Soldier's Play tells the story of a murder in an African American unit of the U.S. Army after World War II. It premiered in 1981 and soon after won a Pulitzer Prize. Now, it's finally on Broadway.

After 40 Years, 'A Soldier's Play' Finally Marches Onto Broadway

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One of the pioneers of London's acid house scene, Andrew Weatherall had an influential career as an electronic music artist, DJ and producer. John Barrett/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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John Barrett/Courtesy of the artist

Andrew Weatherall, Champion Of Underground Music, Dies At 56

DJ and artist Andrew Weatherall died Monday at 56. He was widely heralded in the electronic music world and was a hero of underground dance music.

Andrew Weatherall, Champion Of Underground Music, Dies At 56

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R. Eric Thomas' new book is Here for It: Or, How to Save Your Soul in America. Katie Simbala hide caption

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Katie Simbala

R. Eric Thomas On 'Here For It: Or, How To Save Your Soul In America'

Thomas writes a column that is part news, part culture and part celebrity shade. But in his new book, he takes a look at his own life.

R. Eric Thomas on 'Here for It: Or, How to Save Your Soul in America'

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Ahora son dos ciudades, pero cuando se fundó en 1659 era sola una, que se llamó "Paso del Norte". Ilustración: Carla Berrocal, España. Carla Berrocal/Radio Ambulante hide caption

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Carla Berrocal/Radio Ambulante

A City In Two

The border between Ciudad Juárez in Mexico and El Paso in the U.S. is a place of cultural and linguistic fluidity, exchange and transit. But last year's attack at a Walmart in El Paso put all of that at risk. Listen to the story from "Radio Ambulante," NPR's Spanish-language podcast.

Una ciudad en dos

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