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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Most Teachers Don't Teach Climate Change; 4 In 5 Parents Wish They Did

As students around the globe participate in Earth Day, a new NPR/Ipsos poll finds 55% of teachers don't teach or talk about climate change and 46% of parents haven't discussed it with their kids.

Most Teachers Don't Teach Climate Change; 4 In 5 Parents Wish They Did

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The U.S. Supreme Court will take up three cases that hinge on federal discrimination laws and whether they protect LGBTQ workers when its new term begins in October. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Will Hear Cases On LGBTQ Discrimination Protections For Employees

The court is poised to decide whether Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 applies to sexual orientation and gender identity, along with factors such as race, religion, sex and national origin.

Members of Beyonce's Coachella marching band talk about Bey's commitment to authenticity and the show's historic legacy. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Coachella hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Coachella

'Homecoming,' From The Bleachers: Members Of Beyoncé's Marching Band Look Back

Beyoncé's historic 2018 Coachella performance has been immortalized thanks to the Netflix film Homecoming. Three members of Beyoncé's Coachella marching band talk about the show's prolonged legacy.

Democrats saw a major increase in voter turnout in Texas last year. Now, in the name of combating voter fraud, the Republican-controlled state legislature is looking at a new law that could increase criminal penalties for those who don't fill out voter registration forms properly. Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images

After Democrats Surged In 2018, Republican-Run States Eye New Curbs On Voting

After high turnout in the 2018 midterms gave Democrats big gains, several Republican-controlled states are considering changing the rules around voting in ways that might reduce future turnout.

U.S. Won't Renew Sanction Exemptions For Countries Buying Iran's Oil

Japan, China, India, Turkey and South Korea have been benefiting from temporary waivers since President Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Iran nuclear deal last year.

U.S. Won't Renew Sanction Exemptions For Countries Buying Iran's Oil

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When is a snore just annoying and when is it a sign of sleep apnea? Luckily, they sound pretty different. Aleksandra Shutova / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Aleksandra Shutova / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Beyond Annoying: How To Identify The Sounds Of A Troublesome Snore

Most snoring is harmless, aside from the misery it might cause your bed mate. In some cases though, it's a sign of sleep apnea, a serious condition. Here's how to know the difference.

Beyond Annoying: How To Identify The Sounds Of A Troublesome Snore

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Parts of the Cape Fear River near Fayetteville, N.C., are contaminated with a PFAS compound called GenX. The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services is surveying residents in the area about their health. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Scientists Dig Into Hard Questions About The Fluorinated Pollutants Known As PFAS

PFAS are a family of chemicals accumulating in the soil, rivers, drinking water and the human body. How much exposure to these substances in clothes, firefighting foam and food wrap is too much?

Scientists Dig Into Hard Questions About The Fluorinated Pollutants Known As PFAS

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When the Mueller report was released, Ronnie Hipshire was surprised to find a photo of his father Lee on a poster to support President Trump that was created by Russians. Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR

Inside The Mueller Report, This Man Found A Photo Of His Dad Being Used By Russians

Coal miner Lee Hipshire was photographed in 1976 emerging from a mine after a long day's work. Years after his father's death, his son found out the photo was used by Russian trolls to support Trump.

Inside The Mueller Report, This Man Saw A Photo Of His Dad Being Used By Russians

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The organ of Notre-Dame de Paris Cathedral, one of the most famous in the world, was spared from the Cathedral fire on April 15 but major restoration needs to be done on the instrument. Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephane de Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images

After The Flames, Notre Dame's Centuries-Old Organ May Never Be The Same Again

Chief organist Olivier Latry looks ahead at the church's extensive renovation process after the Notre Dame Cathedral fire on April 15.

After The Flames, Notre Dame's Centuries-Old Organ May Never Be The Same Again

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