NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

Robert Cameron will serve as the next student loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, headquartered in Washington, D.C. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Elizabeth Warren Slams Student Loan Watchdog Hire As 'Outrageous'

Robert Cameron was a top lawyer for one of the country's largest student loan servicers. In documents obtained by NPR, Warren called his appointment a "slap in the face to student loan borrowers."

Elizabeth Warren Slams Student Loan Watchdog Appointment As 'Outrageous'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753377020/753868618" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Clifton Heights Inn was once a Methodist Church and many of the guests who pass through are former congregants. Some have hosted weddings and anniversaries at the church turned inn. Shahla Farzan/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Shahla Farzan/St. Louis Public Radio

Houses Of Worship Find New Life After Congregations Downsize

St. Louis Public Radio

As the percentage of Americans who belong to a church, mosque or synagogue declines, congregations are selling their buildings. Some of those former houses of worship are finding new life.

A Particular Kind Of Black Man cover image Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR

Tope Folarin Was 'A Particular Kind Of Black Man' — So He Wrote A Book About It

The semi-autobiographical coming-of-age tale from the Nigerian-American writer, his debut novel, finds a child of African immigrants growing up in Utah.

Tope Folarin Was 'A Particular Kind Of Black Man' — So He Wrote A Book About It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/751917486/754052349" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sarah Chamberlain, president of the Republican Main Street Partnership, is photographed in February 2017. House GOP moderates clashed with the Republican Main Street Partnership following the 2018 midterm elections, leading many lawmakers to sever ties with the outside group that has been a fixture since the late 1990s. Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Meltdown On Main Street: Inside The Breakdown Of The GOP's Moderate Wing

House GOP moderates clashed with the Republican Main Street Partnership following the 2018 midterms, leading many lawmakers to sever ties with an outside group that's been a fixture since the 1990s.

Peter Lourenco/Getty Images

Men Can Have Better Friendships. Here's How

The bad news: The constraints of masculinity make it hard for men to make and keep good friends, researchers say. The good news: Experts recommend these steps can reverse those forces and connect with others.

Men Can Have Better Friendships. Here's How

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/752412752/753563716" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sign for Flu Shots at a CVS Pharmacy in Boston. Rick Friedman/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rick Friedman/Corbis via Getty Images

We Are Risking Health And Life

The government wants to withhold flu shots from migrants in detention centers even though doctors advise vaccinations for all detainees promptly upon arrival.

Opinion: We Are Risking Health And Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753889380/753962695" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Court orders that the state of Idaho pay for gender confirmation surgery for Adree Edmo, a transgender inmate who was incarcerated at the Idaho State Correctional Institution, pictured above. Heath Druzin/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Heath Druzin/Boise State Public Radio

Court Says Idaho Must Provide Gender Confirmation Surgery To Transgender Inmate

Boise State Public Radio News

A panel of judges ruled Friday that in denying a transgender inmate gender confirmation surgery, the state violated the Eighth Amendment.

The Mapping Memory exhibition in at the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, Texas, displays maps made in the late 1500s in what is now Mexico. They were created by indigenous peoples to help Spanish invaders map occupied lands. This watercolor and ink map of Meztitlán was made in 1579 by Gabriel de Chavez. Blanton Museum of Art hide caption

toggle caption
Blanton Museum of Art

440 Years Old And Filled With Footprints, These Aren't Your Everyday Maps

In 1577, King Philip II of Spain wanted to know whom he was ruling and where in his vast kingdom they were. So his viceroy asked the indigenous groups in what is now Mexico to draw some maps for him.

440 Years Old And Filled With Footprints, These Aren't Your Everyday Maps

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753114640/753717714" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

For her starring role as Vice President Selina Meyer in the seventh and final season of Veep, Julia Louis-Dreyfus recently received another Emmy Award nomination for outstanding lead actress in a comedy series. She won the award six years in a row from 2012-2017. Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Weiss/AFP/Getty Images

Julia Louis-Dreyfus: 'I Don't Think I've Made It ... And I Like That'

Nominated for a ninth Emmy Award in acting, the star of Veep and Seinfeld talks about getting her first laugh, her rocky start at Saturday Night Live and the #MeToo movement.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus: 'I Don't Think I've Made It ... And I Like That'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753576049/753836673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

David Koch with a rendering of The David H. Koch Center for Cancer Care in 2015. The billionaire underwrote both old-fashioned charitable causes and the conservative movement, reshaping U.S. politics. Diane Bondareff/Invision for Koch Industries hide caption

toggle caption
Diane Bondareff/Invision for Koch Industries

David Koch Dies; Conservative Billionaire Helped Reshape U.S. Politics

Koch and his brother Charles built one of the nation's largest private businesses and created a network of secretly funded organizations that attacked Democrats.

David Koch Dies; Conservative Billionaire Helped Reshape U.S. Politics

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/693716112/753713539" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

When children are held for long periods away in detention centers, such as this center for migrant children in Carrizo Springs, Texas, they may suffer psychological harm. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

Lengthy Detention Of Migrant Children May Create Lasting Trauma, Say Researchers

The Trump administration is trying to legalize indefinite detention of migrant families. But detention can be emotionally crushing for kids, leading to long-term mental health problems like PTSD.

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

Tiny Desk Concerts

New and exclusive videos from the popular concert series.

more from