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Peet Sapsin directs clients inside custom built "Gainz Pods", during his HIIT class, (high intensity interval training), at Sapsins Inspire South Bay Fitness, Redondo Beach, California, Wednesday, June 17, 2020. Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

My Gym Is Reopening. Is It Safe To Work Out There?

As gyms open for business, new rules aim to limit the spread of COVID-19, including spacing equipment, regular cleanings and limiting attendance. But experts say it's still safer to exercise at home.

A pedestrian in a mask passes a sign urging people to practice social distancing, on Saturday in Miami Beach, Fla. Just as residents flocked outside to enjoy the Fourth of July, states such as Florida were reporting skyrocketing numbers of confirmed coronavirus cases. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

States Shatter Coronavirus Records As Officials Eye Holiday Weekend With Alarm

Both Florida and South Carolina reported their highest-ever daily totals for new cases. But they're not alone: The caseload is spiking across the U.S., and the Fourth of July may only make it worse.

Youth from across Philadelphia gathered in front of City Hall June 9 to protest police brutality and voice their concerns and vision for the future. According to recent research cited by the CDC, nearly half of all Americans between 18 and 29 report symptoms of anxiety or depression. Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Why Some Young People Fear Social Isolation More Than COVID-19

It's not that young adults aren't worried about the pandemic, psychologists say, but they are at far greater risk of dying by suicide. Finding ways beyond screens to foster social bonds is crucial.

Why Some Young People Fear Social Isolation More Than COVID-19

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President Trump, pictured June 5, signs a bill extending the time period for businesses to use funds from the Paycheck Protection Program. On Saturday he signed a bill extending the deadline to apply for the program. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Signs Small Business Loan Program Extension

The Paycheck Protection Program, enacted to help small businesses dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, had expired Tuesday. With Trump's signature Saturday, the new deadline to apply is Aug. 8.

Meredith Miotke for NPR

From Camping To Dining Out: Here's How Experts Rate The Risks Of 14 Summer Activities

The weather is warming up and public spaces are starting to reopen. How do you decide what's safe to do? We have guidance to help you compare and evaluate the risks.

From Camping To Dining Out: Here's How Experts Rate The Risks Of 14 Summer Activities

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Cars on the Southern State Parkway in Nassau County, circa 1960. The urban planner Robert Moses, according to biographers, designed the road so that bridges were low enough to keep buses — which would likely be carrying poor minorities — from passing underneath on the route from New York City to Long Island's beaches. Pictorial Parade/Getty Images hide caption

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Pictorial Parade/Getty Images

'The Wrong Complexion For Protection.' How Race Shaped America's Roadways And Cities

An expert in urban planning and environmental policy explains how race has played a central role in how cities across America developed — often in ways that hurt minority communities.

'The Wrong Complexion For Protection.' How Race Shaped America's Roadways And Cities

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Timothy Berry (left) Madea Moore and Jonathan Horton Elias Williams for NPR, Madea Moore and Jonathan Horton hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR, Madea Moore and Jonathan Horton

Black Patriotism: When Love Of Country Means Holding It Accountable

For many African Americans, patriotism is complicated because the promises of America aren't fulfilled equally. The Fourth of July brings a challenge: reconciling national pride with systemic racism.

Black Patriotism: When Love Of Country Means Holding It Accountable

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The words "Care, not cages" are viewed from the Griffith Observatory in L.A. The activist Patrisse Cullors had them flown over the city's Men's Central Jail. "What we are challenging the county to do right now is to actually invest into our communities through an alternatives to incarceration fund," says Cullors. Chris Mastro, In Plain Sight hide caption

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Chris Mastro, In Plain Sight

With Fleets Of Planes, Artists Take To Skies Nationwide To Protest Mass Detention

This Independence Day, more than 80 artists will fly pro-immigrant messages over detention facilities and courts, former internment camps, the U.S.-Mexico border and Ellis Island.

Pictured from left to right: catcher O'Neal Pullen, pitcher Ajay Johnson, shortstop Biz Mackey and manager Lonnie Goodwin Negro Leagues Baseball Museum/Courtesy of Bill Staples, Jr. hide caption

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Negro Leagues Baseball Museum/Courtesy of Bill Staples, Jr.

Outplaying Segregation, Negro National League Hits 100-Year Milestone

NPR's Scott Simon reflects on the 100th anniversary of Negro National League as a response to segregation in major league baseball.

Opinion: Outplaying Segregation, Negro National League Hits 100-Year Milestone

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Julian Bass went viral for his superhero video with special effects. Julian Bass/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Julian Bass/Screenshot by NPR

A Theater Student Gets Supersized Attention After Superhero Video Goes Viral

College theater student Julian Bass got big affirmation for his video where he morphs into superheroes. He talks with NPR's Scott Detrow about his sudden fame — and his love for Spider-Man.

A Theater Student Gets Supersized Attention After Superhero Video Goes Viral

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Chris Mosier, the first transgender person to qualify for an Olympic trial, joined protesters in Boise, Idaho to push back against legislation targeting transgender residents. James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

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James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio

New Idaho Laws Target Transgender Residents

Boise State Public Radio News

Transgender people in Idaho say two new state laws are aimed at making their lives much harder. One involves changing the sex listed on birth certificates. The other affects trans athletes.

New Idaho Laws Target Transgender Residents

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In this photograph shared by the Washington State Patrol, the vehicle that hit protesters sits dented and damaged. Police say they have arrested the driver, but they have not yet assigned a motive for the incident. Rick Johnson/Washington State Patrol/Twitter hide caption

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Rick Johnson/Washington State Patrol/Twitter

1 Killed, 1 Injured After Driver Strikes Protesters In Seattle

Police have the driver in custody, but no motive has been given. Videos on social media depict the vehicle apparently swerving into a group of protesters on a freeway this weekend.

The President's Daily Briefing is the top-secret intelligence report the CIA presents to the president every weekday. The book shown here is for a briefing delivered to President George W. Bush in 2002. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Experts Say Intel Should Have Reached Trump On Russian Bounty Program

The president says no one told him about a suspected Russian bounty program. Reports say the information was available in a detailed intelligence file called the President's Daily Briefing.

Experts Say Intel Should Have Reached Trump On Russian Bounty Program

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From L to R: Danielle, Alana and Este Haim. Reto Schmid/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Reto Schmid/Courtesy of the artist

HAIM Is The Opposite Of Wimpy On 'Women In Music Pt. III'

Sisters Este, Danielle and Alana discuss mining personal fears and pain to write their third album, which they've given the clever acronym WIMPIII.

HAIM Is The Opposite Of Wimpy On 'Women In Music Pt. III'

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"I dug my fingers there and here and stretched my arms like ropes. I threw my body through the air and caught myself in all the ways I'd imagined, a bright path of thinking." Yao Xiao/Make Me a World hide caption

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Yao Xiao/Make Me a World

This Book Teaches Kids 'How To Solve A Problem' Like A Rock Climber Would

Nineteen-year-old Ashima Shiraishi may be one of the most talented rock climbers in the world, but lofty titles aside, she wants kids to know that most of climbing — and life — is "just falling."

This Book Teaches Kids 'How To Solve A Problem' Like A Rock Climber Would

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Angela Weiss/Getty Images

D.L. Hughley: 'Everybody Knows' Independence Day Didn't Free Us All

In his new book, Surrender, White People!, Hughley suggests Americans consider whether national holidays speak to the entire nation — along with other bitingly funny ideas for addressing injustice.

D. L. Hughley: 'Everybody Knows' Independence Day Didn't Free Us All

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