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In this photo illustration, the LastPass logo is reflected on the internal discs of a hard drive in 2017 in London. On Wednesday, the password service reported "unusual activity" within a third-party cloud storage service but said that customers' passwords remain safely encrypted. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/Getty Images

Major password manager LastPass suffered a breach — again

LastPass said an unauthorized party used information gained in an August breach to access customer information. But the company said customers' passwords remain safely encrypted.

Christian Pulisic of the United States attends a news conference before a training session at Al-Gharafa SC Stadium, in Doha, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2022. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

U.S. Soccer star Christian Pulisic mending, and hopes to play in Saturday's match

Pulisic suffered a pelvic injury when scoring the winning goal in the U.S. squad's game against Iran on Tuesday. The victory moved the U.S. team onto a knockout match against the Netherlands.

New York City Mayor Eric Adams visits the New York Stock Exchange on Nov. 17. This week, he announced that officials will begin hospitalizing more homeless people by involuntarily providing care to those deemed to be in "psychiatric crisis." Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

NYC Mayor Eric Adams faces backlash for his move to involuntarily hospitalize homeless people

The mayor announced this week that officials will begin hospitalizing more homeless people by involuntarily providing care to those deemed to be in "psychiatric crisis."

An attendee makes a video as FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried speaks during the New York Times DealBook Summit in the Appel Room at the Jazz At Lincoln Center on November 30, 2022 in New York City. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Sam Bankman-Fried strikes an apologetic pose as he describes being shocked by FTX's fall

During an hour-long interview at the New York Times Dealbook Summit, Bankman-Fried frequently portrayed himself as in the dark about the condition of the multi-billion dollar exchange he founded.

Sam Bankman-Fried strikes apologetic pose as he describes being shocked by FTX's fall

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Seattle Mariners pitcher Gaylord Perry throws in his 300th Major League victory, a 7-3 win over the New York Yankees in Seattle, on May 6, 1982. The Hall of Famer and two-time Cy Young winner died Thursday. Barry Sweet/AP hide caption

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Barry Sweet/AP

Baseball great Gaylord Perry, a two-time Cy Young winner, dies at 84

The Baseball Hall of Famer, a master of the spitball, made history as the first player to win the Cy Young Award in both leagues. Perry pitched for eight major-league teams from 1962 until 1983.

This photo from 2019 provided by the U.S. Air Force/Alaska National Guard photo shows how closely the village of Napakiak, Alaska is at risk of severe erosion by the nearby Kuskokwim River. Emily Farnsworth/AP hide caption

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Emily Farnsworth/AP

3 tribes dealing with the toll of climate change get $75 million to relocate

The Biden administration gave $75 million in aid to the three communities in Alaska and Washington. Eight other Tribal communities received an additional $40 million.

Antwon McGhee is one of about 500 Warrior Met Coal miners in Brookwood, Ala., who have been on strike for 20 months. Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom hide caption

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Stephan Bisaha/Gulf States Newsroom

Alabama coal miners begin their 20th month on strike

Gulf States Newsroom

The miners have survived more than 600 days on the picket line, thanks to widespread support and anger at their employer, Warrior Met Coal. Even now, neither side seems ready to budge.

Alabama coal miners begin their 20th month on strike

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The Google Doodle on Dec. 1 honors Jerry Lawson on what would have been his 82nd birthday. The engineer and entrepreneur created the technology that paved the way for modern gaming. Google/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google/Screenshot by NPR

Today's interactive Google Doodle honors Jerry Lawson, a pioneer of modern gaming

Jerry Lawson would have turned 82 on Dec. 1. Google is celebrating the late engineer with a Doodle on its homepage, made up of several interactive games that users can customize themselves.

Christine McVie from the band Fleetwood Mac performs at Madison Square Garden in New York on Oct. 6, 2014. The band announced her death on social media Wednesday. Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP hide caption

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Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

Fleetwood Mac singer-songwriter Christine McVie dies at 79

The British-born vocalist, songwriter and keyboard player whose cool, soulful contralto helped define such classics as "You Make Loving Fun," "Everywhere" and "Don't Stop," died Wednesday.

Students from the Fontbonne Academy in Milton, Mass., make notes in the pews during a field trip to Old North Church in October. The high schoolers were the first to use Old North Church's new history curriculum, which teaches students about how the church and its early congregants profited from the work of slaves. Meg Woolhouse/GBH News hide caption

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Meg Woolhouse/GBH News

A Boston church, a beacon of Revolutionary War freedom, grapples with its ties to slavery

GBH

Old North Church, known for the "one if by land, two if by sea" signal to Paul Revere, was built with the proceeds from enslaved labor.

China is doing many millions of tests a day to uncover cases of COVID-19 — part of its zero-COVID policy. Above: People line up for nucleic acid tests to detect the virus at a public testing site on Nov. 17 in Beijing. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Why China's 'zero COVID' policy is finally faltering

For nearly three years, China has enforced incredibly strict rules to keep coronavirus transmission in check. But now they're facing a potentially deadly omicron surge.

Why China's 'zero COVID' policy is finally faltering

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Lucy Greco (left), a web-accessibility specialist at the University of California, Berkeley, is blind. She reads most of her documents online, but employs Liza Schlosser-Olroyd as an aide to sort through her paper mail every other month, to make sure Greco hasn't missed a bill or other important correspondence. Shelby Knowles for KHN hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for KHN

Medical bills remain inaccessible for many visually impaired Americans

Kaiser Health News

When health bills aren't legible — via large-print, Braille or other adaptive technology — blind patients can't know what they owe, and are too often sent to debt collections, an investigation finds.

EPA Administrator Michael Regan visited Jackson, Miss., several times in 2021 to evaluate water system needs and better understand the challenges the city was facing. Kobee Vance/MPB News hide caption

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Kobee Vance/MPB News

The Justice Department sues Jackson, Miss., for water safety violations

Mississippi Public Broadcasting

The Department of Justice is suing Jackson, Miss., for violations of the Clean Drinking Water Act and is seeking to revoke the city's control over its water systems. The city is already under two court orders for violating EPA water standards.

Dr. Caitlin Bernard, a reproductive healthcare provider, speaks during an abortion rights rally on June 25, 2022, at the Indiana Statehouse in Indianapolis. Jenna Watson/AP hide caption

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Jenna Watson/AP

Indiana's AG wants the doctor who spoke of 10-year-old's abortion to be penalized

Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita, who is anti-abortion, alleges Dr. Caitlin Bernard violated state law by not reporting the girl's child abuse to authorities and violated patient privacy laws.

A participant holding a sign at a 2020 solidarity march in unity against the rise of antisemitism. The Anti-Defamation League reported that antisemitic incidents reached an all-time high in 2021. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

How to address antisemitic rhetoric when you encounter it

Political leaders have criticized former President Donald Trump's dinner with Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, and Nick Fuentes, a Holocaust denier.

Despite its name, Weeknight Meaty Chili is actually a vegetarian dish. Joe Keller/America's Test Kitchen hide caption

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Joe Keller/America's Test Kitchen

Love chili but trying to eat less meat? 'Morning Edition' tests a plant-based version

Jack Bishop of the PBS television show America's Test Kitchen walked Morning Edition host A Martínez through a recipe from the kitchen's new vegan cookbook. Texans beware: This chili features beans.

Love chili but trying to eat less meat? 'Morning Edition' tests a plant-based version

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Richard Fierro, right, hugs a supporter at his brewery in Colorado Springs, Colo., Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2022. Fierro helped subdue a shooter who killed five people at a gay nightclub Nov. 19. Thomas Peipert/AP hide caption

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Thomas Peipert/AP

National

Colorado Springs rallies for LGBTQ+ fundraisers after Club Q shooting

CPR News

The fundraiser happened days after the shooting left five people dead, but was planned before Army veteran Richard Fierro gained national attention for helping stop the attack at Club Q on Nov. 19.

In this Feb. 27, 2020, file photo, the DoorDash app is shown on a smartphone in New York. DoorDash is cutting more than 1,200 corporate jobs, saying it hired too many people when demand for its services increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. AP hide caption

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AP

DoorDash cuts 1,250 jobs after pandemic hiring surge

The decision by the online food delivery platform to eliminate about 6% of its workforce is the latest of several companies to recently announce job cuts recently, including Twitter and Amazon.

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