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President Trump's Twitter page is displayed on a mobile phone. The social media company flagged one of his tweets as "glorifying violence" and hide it from the public. Olivier Morin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Morin/AFP via Getty Images

The History Behind 'When The Looting Starts, The Shooting Starts'

In response to the violent protests in Minneapolis, the president tweets a phrase that goes back to the 1960s, used by a white police chief known for inflaming racial tensions in Miami.

Police officers gathered Thursday in downtown Louisville, Ky., as protesters demonstrated against the killing of Breonna Taylor, a black woman fatally shot by police in her home in March. @mckinley_moore via AP hide caption

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@mckinley_moore via AP

7 Shot At Louisville Protest Calling For Justice For Breonna Taylor

It's not yet clear who shot people in the crowd. The mayor says no officers fired weapons on the demonstrations for the black woman killed by police in her home. Two victims required surgery, he says.

Missouri's only clinic that provides abortions, located in St. Louis, will be able to keep operating after a state commission decided Friday, that the health department was wrong not to renew the license of the Planned Parenthood facility. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Missouri's Only Clinic That Provides Abortions Allowed To Remain Open

"Planned Parenthood has demonstrated that it provides safe and legal abortion care," a state commission ruled. It said state health regulators wrongly blocked the St. Louis clinic's renewal in 2019.

Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden at Delaware Memorial Bridge Veteran's Memorial Park in Newcastle, Del., earlier this month. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Calls George Floyd Killing 'An Act of Brutality'

The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee called on the nation to better empathize with the pain of black Americans in the wake of the death of the black man by a white police officer.

Moscow revised its April death toll from coronavirus to roughly double its initial tally amid criticism that Russia may have undercounted deaths from the disease. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Moscow Doubles Last Month's Coronavirus Death Toll Amid Suspicions Of Undercounting

Media reports and analysts have questioned the accuracy of Russia's mortality figures for the virus. The city's health department now says 1,561 people died in April due to coronavirus.

Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says a new analysis supports the effectiveness of the CDC's system for spotting infectious disease outbreaks early. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

CDC Director Says New Analysis Exonerates Agency On Testing Delay

CDC chief Robert Redfield says that earlier testing for the coronavirus would have been like "looking for a needle in a haystack." But other health experts dispute his assertion.

Cristina Spano for NPR

Colleges Face Student Lawsuits Seeking Refunds After Coronavirus Closures

The legal cases argue that online classes don't have the same value as on-campus ones.

Colleges Face Student Lawsuits Seeking Refunds After Coronavirus Closures

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Manager Mike Bonavita wears a protective mask as he cleans windows at the Quattro Italian restaurant in Boston on May 12 during the coronavirus pandemic. This month, Massachusetts' governor declared wearing masks mandatory. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

The Battle Between The Masked And The Masked-Nots Unveils Political Rifts

Wearing a mask has become political as some state officials have faced backlash for mandating mask use during the coronavirus pandemic.

The IRS has announced that with employer approval, employees will be allowed to add, drop or alter some of their benefits — including flexible spending account contributions — for the remainder of 2020. Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images hide caption

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Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images

IRS Rule Shift Lets Workers Make Benefits Changes Midyear — If Their Employer Agrees

Kaiser Health News

The new guidance amounts to a midyear open-enrollment period and applies to firms that buy health insurance to cover their workers as well as to those that self-insure — paying claims on their own.

Dr. Ming Lin was fired from his position as an emergency room physician at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center in Bellingham, Washington after publicly complaining about the hospital's infection control procedures during the pandmic. Yoshimi Lin hide caption

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Yoshimi Lin

An ER Doctor Lost His Job After Criticizing His Hospital On COVID-19. Now He's Suing.

Dr. Ming Lin was let go in March from a hospital in Bellingham, Wash., after posting criticisms and suggestions on social media. The ACLU is helping him sue for damages and job reinstatement.

An election worker in Dallas setting up a polling place ahead of the March 3 in Texas. Texas officials are resisting efforts to expand mail-in voting due to the pandemic and insisting that voters cast ballots in person in upcoming elections. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Texas Voters Are Caught In The Middle Of A Battle Over Mail-In Voting

KUT 90.5

Even as many other states expand mail-in voting due to the pandemic, Texas officials say they may prosecute voters who ask for an absentee ballot because they're scared of going to the polls.

Tracee Ellis Ross stars in The High Note as a legendary singer who is running out of ideas. Meanwhile, her personal assistant, played by Dakota Johnson, has too many. Maarten de Boer/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Maarten de Boer/Courtesy of the artist

Tracee Ellis Ross Can Hit The High Notes, Too

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to Tracee Ellis Ross about starring in The High Note, a movie about an over-40 superstar singer navigating the music industry with her assistant, who has her own music dreams.

Tracee Ellis Ross Can Hit The High Notes, Too

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Joshua Boliver and Gali Beeri decided to quarantine together in New York City — after one date. Gali Beeri hide caption

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Gali Beeri

Love At First Quarantine: After A Single Date, Couple Hunkers Down Together

New Yorkers Gali Beeri and Joshua Boliver met at a dance class in March as the city was about to lock down. The near-strangers took a leap of faith and are riding out quarantine in Joshua's apartment.

Love At First Quarantine: After A Single Date, Couple Hunkers Down Together

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