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Fox News host Tucker Carlson "is not 'stating actual facts' about the topics he discusses and is instead engaging in 'exaggeration' and 'non-literal commentary,'" wrote U.S. District Judge Mary Kay Vyskocil. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

You Literally Can't Believe The Facts Tucker Carlson Tells You. So Say Fox's Lawyers

Fox News viewers don't expect facts from Tucker Carlson, according to network lawyers who defended their star in a slander lawsuit filed by a woman who said she had an affair with President Trump.

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President Trump announced the creation of Operation Warp Speed in May to fast-track a coronavirus vaccine. He called it "a massive scientific and industrial, logistic endeavor unlike anything our country has seen since the Manhattan Project." Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

How Operation Warp Speed's Big Vaccine Contracts Could Stay Secret

More than $6 billion in federal funding has been routed through a firm that manages defense contracts, making the agreements subject to less federal scrutiny and transparency.

How Operation Warp Speed's Big Vaccine Contracts Could Stay Secret

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A sign on the back of a truck promotes 2020 census participation in Reading, Pa. A day after the Census Bureau announced a new "target date" for ending counting efforts, a federal judge in California said she thinks the schedule is "a violation" of her court order. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Census End Remains Uncertain After Judge Calls New Schedule 'A Violation'

A day after the Census Bureau tweeted out a new "target date" of Oct. 5 for ending 2020 census counting, a federal judge in California said she thinks the schedule change may violate a court order.

A visitor wears a mask while walking by Mickey Mouse at Hong Kong Disneyland. Lam Yik/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Lam Yik/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Disney Lays Off 28,000 Workers

The Walt Disney Company said the layoffs affect its Parks, Experiences and Products division. "We initially hoped that this situation would be short-lived," the division chairman wrote in a letter to employees. "Seven months later, we find that has not been the case."

Minasse Wondimu Hailu/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Indicator Goes Around The World Without Leaving The Country

The coronavirus has cratered the global tourism industry, but there is a new type of travel: Virtual tours.

The Indicator World Tour

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Stacks of ballots are prepared to be checked by a worker at a Board of Elections facility, Wednesday, July 22, 2020, in New York City. This week, the city's election board mailed out error-filled ballots to about 100,000 voters. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

NYC To Send New Ballots To Nearly 100,000 Voters After Printing Error

WNYC Radio

The error comes as voting by mail is set to expand significantly due to the pandemic and as President Trump has frequently made false claims that the practice will lead to widespread electoral fraud.

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson (left) and Detroit Pistons Vice Chairman Arn Tellem talk about voting last Thursday, when balloting began in the state. The Pistons are allowing their arena to be used as a polling station. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

'Russia Doesn't Have To Make Fake News': Biggest Election Threat Is Closer To Home

National security officials say Russia is again trying to disrupt the election. But this time, it doesn't have to work so hard because Americans are spreading mistruths and doubts about the election.

Anita Hill (shown here in 2017) is chair of the Hollywood Commission, which intends to combat sexual misconduct and gender inequities across the industry. Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP hide caption

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Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

Anita Hill On Sexual Harassment In Hollywood And Beyond

Hill, chair of the Hollywood Commission, discusses a new report's findings on sexual harassment in the industry. She also discusses Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation battle and Joe Biden.

Anita Hill On Sexual Harassment In Hollywood And Beyond

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Judge Amy Coney Barrett speaks after President Donald Trump announced her as his nominee to the Supreme Court, in the Rose Garden at the White House on Sept. 26. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Amy Coney Barrett's Catholicism Is Controversial But May Not Be Confirmation Issue

Democrats are unhappy over Barrett's nomination and object to her conservative legal views, but they are unlikely to question her Catholic beliefs.

Amy Coney Barrett's Catholicism Is Controversial But May Not Be Confirmation Issue

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Doris "Dorie" Miller, USN Mess Attendant Second Class, May 27, 1942 after presentation of the Navy Cross by Admiral Chester W. Nimitz aboard USS Enterprise. U.S. Navy photos courtesy of the National Archives hide caption

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U.S. Navy photos courtesy of the National Archives

A Military 1st: A Supercarrier Is Named After An African American Sailor

North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC

USS Doris Miller will honor a Black Pearl Harbor hero and key figure in the rise of the civil rights movement. Miller, a sharecropper's son from Waco, Texas was just 22 years when he created history.

Multiple vaccines trials are in their final phase, but we're probably still closer to the beginning of the pandemic than the end. Pictured here, a municipal cemetery worker digs a grave in a special cemetery for suspected COVID-19 victims on Sept. 11 in Jakarta, Indonesia. Ed Wray/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Wray/Getty Images

With 1 Million Dead Worldwide, The Latest On A Coronavirus Vaccine

With 10 vaccine candidates now in phase three trials, one expert predicts another million people worldwide could die within three to six months.

With 1 Million Dead Worldwide, The Latest On A Coronavirus Vaccine

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Family members Armin Prude (left) and Joe Prude stand with a picture of Daniel Prude in Rochester, N.Y., Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020. While suffering a mental health crisis, Prude, 41, suffocated after police in Rochester put a "spit hood" over his head while being taken into custody. He died March 30 after he was taken off life support, seven days after the encounter with police. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Rochester Hospital Released Daniel Prude Hours Before Fatal Encounter With Police

Daniel Prude's family knew he was having a psychiatric crisis and needed care. A few hours after his release from Strong Memorial Hospital, an encounter with police proved fatal.

Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez speaks with the news media, last month, at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Fla. Gimenez said Tuesday that he would keep some COVID-19 restrictions in place despite an order by Fla. Gov. Ron DeSantis. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Florida's Miami-Dade Pushes Back On Loosening Of Coronavirus Restrictions

County Mayor Carlos Gimenez says the opening ordered by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis comes too soon and he expressed concern that the number of coronavirus cases could shoot up.

A free food refrigerator in New York City organized by volunteers with the volunteer collective A New World In Our Hearts. Courtesy IOHNYC /Courtesy IOHNYC hide caption

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Courtesy IOHNYC /Courtesy IOHNYC

Freedge Movement: Grassroots Efforts Fight Food Insecurity With Free Refrigerators

An ad hoc network of activists and anarchists from New York to L.A. are setting up the food refrigerators to help address neighborhoods in need, a problem that's grown more acute during the pandemic.

Freedge Movement: Grassroots Efforts Fight Food Insecurity With Free Refrigerators

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Kobe Bryant, his wife and two daughters pose at the world premiere of "A Wrinkle in Time" in Los Angeles in 2018. Bryant and his daughter Gianna were killed in a helicopter crash in January. Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP hide caption

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Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

'Kobe Bryant Bill' Makes It A Crime For First Responders To Photograph Dead Bodies

The bill, signed into law on Monday, came after reports surfaced of gruesome photos being shared of the helicopter crash site that killed Bryant and others.

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