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Argentina's Lionel Messi, center, celebrates at the end of the World Cup group C soccer match between Argentina and Mexico, at the Lusail Stadium in Lusail, Qatar, on Saturday. Argentina won 2-0. Moises Castillo/AP hide caption

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Moises Castillo/AP

Lionel Messi's goal revives Argentina's World Cup hopes

Messi drove a low shot from 25 yards into the bottom corner in the 64th minute. He ran toward Argentina's fans with his arms outstretched before getting mobbed by his jubilant teammates.

Rescuers stand next to a bus carried away after heavy rainfall triggered landslides that collapsed buildings and left as many as 12 people missing, in Casamicciola, on the southern Italian island of Ischia, Italy, on Saturday. Salvatore Laporta/AP hide caption

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Salvatore Laporta/AP

A landslide on an Italian island leaves 1 dead, up to 12 missing and 100 stranded

Heavy rainfall triggered landslides early Saturday on the southern Italian island of Ischia. It cut a muddy swath through a port town, collapsing buildings and sweeping cars into the sea.

Ukrainians walk through the unlit streets of the capital Kyiv on Thursday, a day after Russian airstrikes knocked out electricity, heating and water to much of the country. With Russian troops faring poorly on the battlefield, Russia has launched a widespread bombing campaign directed at civilian infrastructure in Ukraine. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Russia destroys and Ukraine repairs in a battle to survive the winter

Ukraine is still recovering from the latest Russian airstrikes. Ukraine's air defenses have proved more resilient than expected. But can it cope this winter with an onslaught on the electricity grid?

Russia strikes, Ukraine repairs, in a battle to survive the winter

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The Treasury Department is allowing Chevron to resume "limited" energy production in Venezuela after years of sanctions that have dramatically curtailed oil and gas profits that have flowed to President Nicolás Maduro's government. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Biden eases Venezuela sanctions as opposition talks resume

The U.S. Treasury Department is allowing Chevron to resume "limited" energy production in Venezuela after years of sanctions have curbed oil and gas profits flowing to President Maduro's government.

Pakistan's former prime minister and opposition leader, Imran Khan, addresses to his supporters during a rally, in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, on Saturday. Khan said Saturday his party was quitting the country's regional and national assemblies. Anjum Naveed/AP hide caption

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Anjum Naveed/AP

Imran Khan says his party will quit all assemblies in Pakistan

The former prime minister was ousted in a no-confidence vote in parliament in April. He is now in the opposition and has been demanding early elections.

The Wiz is just one of the shows celebrated in the new Museum of Broadway. Monique Carboni/Museum of Broadway hide caption

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Monique Carboni/Museum of Broadway

The Museum of Broadway reveals the show behind the show

A new museum celebrating the history of Broadway is now in New York's theater district.

The Museum of Broadway reveals the show behind the show

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Cartoonist Charles Schulz poses with a sketch of Snoopy in his office in Santa Rosa, Calif. Schulz, who died shortly after his retirement in 2000, would have turned 100 on Nov. 26. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

'Peanuts' still brings comfort and joy, 100 years after Charles Schulz's birth

While Schulz stipulated that the strip would end with him, his iconic characters live on. His widow, Jeannie Schulz, says people still get comfort from the comic because "it talks about humanity."

In this picture released by the official website of the office of the Iranian supreme leader, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei speaks during a meeting with a group of Basij paramilitary force in Tehran, Iran, on Saturday. Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP hide caption

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Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP

Iran leader praises force tasked with quashing dissent

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said paramilitary volunteers "sacrificed themselves" to protect people from "rioters," as eye doctors warn that demonstrators have been blinded in the anti-government protests.

Bouquets of flowers are left near Club Q, an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado Springs, Colorado. At least five people were killed and 18 wounded in a mass shooting at an LGBTQ nightclub in the US city of Colorado Springs, police said on November 20, 2022. JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JASON CONNOLLY/AFP via Getty Images

Our tragic new normal

NPR's Scott Simon notes how common mass shootings have become in the U.S., and asks how this violence affects how we think about our everyday lives.

Opinion: Our tragic new normal

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Jose-Luis Jimenez, a University of Colorado professor whose expertise includes aerosols, atmospheric chemistry and disease transmission, uses a carbon dioxide measuring device as a proxy for gauging the possible presence of COVID-19 in the air at Denver International Airport in October. Hart Van Denburg/CPR News hide caption

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Hart Van Denburg/CPR News

How to think like an aerosol scientist and stay healthy this holiday season

CPR News

Nothing is worse than having to miss a flight home thanks to catching a nasty bug. And this year, there's a trio of highly contagious viruses going around that could cause a lot more than a runny nose.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer shows a "My Body My Decision" shirt at the 14th District Democratic Headquarters in Detroit on November 8. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

What we know (and don't know) about how abortion affected the midterms

What can polls tell us? (Not a lot.) Why did ballot measures favor abortion rights while abortion rights opponents won handily? (It's complicated.) And more lessons from the midterms.

What we know (and don't know) about how abortion affected the midterms

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