NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

Police escort recaptured inmates back to the Croix-des-Bouquets Civil Prison after Thursday's outbreak in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. As of Friday night, authorities were still searching for more than 200 escapees. Dieu Nalio Chery/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dieu Nalio Chery/AP

At Least 25 Dead After Prison Break In Haiti In Which Hundreds Of Inmates Escaped

As of late Friday, more than 200 inmates were still on the run, according to authorities. The outbreak is another setback for a country gripped by political turmoil and gang violence.

A herd of goats in Russia ponders ... well, we can't really know what they're pondering, but it's a safe bet they're interested in finding something to eat. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images

How Goats (And Perhaps People) Make Up Their Minds

How does a herd decide which direction to head in? Researchers put GPS collars on a gathering of goats to find out. Here's what they learned — and how it might apply to humans.

Chanell Stone photographs places like overgrown lots and green spaces at public housing projects, often including herself in the frame. Above, "In search of a certain Eden," 2019, Brooklyn. Chanell Stone hide caption

toggle caption
Chanell Stone

Housing Projects And Empty Lots. How Chanell Stone Is Reframing Nature Photography

Chanell Stone wants to change how people think about nature photography. "As Black people, it feels like these rural spaces aren't for us," she says. "I want to turn that idea on its head."

A Capitol Police officer holds a program as people pay their respects at the remains officer Brian Sicknick, who died after defending the Capitol against the Jan. 6 insurrection. Demetrius Freeman/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Demetrius Freeman/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

FBI Singles Out Person Seen On Video Spraying Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick

Sicknick was injured while fending off the mob of Trump supporters who attacked the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. He died the following evening from his injuries.

The Biden administration has reopened shelters for migrant teens that were first used by the Trump administration in Carrizo Springs, Texas. Long trailers that previously housed oil workers in two-bedroom suites were turned into dorms with bunk beds, classrooms and medical care. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

Biden Pledges That Border Shelter For Teens 'Won't Stay Open Very Long'

Advocates say reopening a Trump-era facility near the border in Texas to house minors suggests the president isn't following through on his promises to change the nation's approach to immigration.

Biden Pledges That Border Shelter For Teens 'Won't Stay Open Very Long'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971425227/971912654" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Restrictions on public gatherings and indoor dining, as well as improved rates of mask-wearing and social distancing helped bring down the rate of new coronavirus infections in the U.S. Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

How Americans' Changed Behavior Helped Beat Back The Winter Surge

The country has beat back the winter surge, and experts credit Americans' improved compliance with precautions like mask-wearing. But we could we still face a resurgence if we let up.

LA Johnson/NPR

With One Move, Congress Could Lift Millions Of Children Out Of Poverty

Lawmakers are weighing a proposal to give families with kids a monthly cash benefit to help ease the lifelong pull of poverty. Experts say it could cut U.S. child poverty nearly in half.

With One Move, Congress Could Lift Millions Of Children Out Of Poverty

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970999998/971447505" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

This coyote was one of several collared by wildlife biologists monitoring their behavior in the Bay Area headlands. Authorities are trying to catch an unusually bold coyote in the East Bay responsible for attacks on humans. San Francisco Chronicle/Hearst N/Hearst Newspapers via Getty Imag hide caption

toggle caption
San Francisco Chronicle/Hearst N/Hearst Newspapers via Getty Imag

Search For Coyote Continues After Several Attacks In The San Francisco Bay Area

At least five people have reported being bitten. The unusual behavior has residents worried and wildlife authorities working overtime to capture the animal.

Hofstra University student Divya Singh found herself beset by a double whammy of bills from two of the costliest kinds of institutions in America — colleges and hospitals. After experiencing anxiety when her family had trouble coming up with the money for her tuition, she sought counseling and ended up with a weeklong stay in a psychiatric hospital — and a resulting $3,413 bill. Jackie Molloy for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Jackie Molloy for KHN

College Tuition Sparked A Mental Health Crisis. Then The Hefty Hospital Bill Arrived

Kaiser Health News

A student sought counseling help after panicking over a tuition bill. A weeklong stay in a psychiatric hospital followed — along with a $3,413 bill. The hospital soft-pedaled its charity care policy.

College Tuition Sparked A Mental Health Crisis. Then The Hefty Hospital Bill Arrived

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/969494206/971681240" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nico Walker Michael Krim hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Krim

Will Nico Walker Watch 'Cherry?' Probably Not

The new movie Cherry follows an Iraq war vet who gets addicted to heroin and starts robbing banks. It's based on a semi-autobiographical novel by Nico Walker, who was just released from prison.

Will Nico Walker Watch 'Cherry?' Probably Not

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971356361/972056988" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A recent gathering of New York City mayoral candidates on Zoom. Screenshot by Liz Kim/WNYC hide caption

toggle caption
Screenshot by Liz Kim/WNYC

OPINION: It's Hard To Shake Hands And Kiss Babies On Zoom

Pandemic social distancing has made candidates for New York mayor both more and less accessible.

OPINION: It's Hard To Shake Hands And Kiss Babies On Zoom

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/972002404/972056976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Futuristic Girl: Nevaeh Camara Kahran and Regis Bethencourt hide caption

toggle caption
Kahran and Regis Bethencourt

Photographers Make Kids' Wildest Dreams Come To Life

A husband and wife photography team create avant-garde and futuristic shoots for their clients. The couple hopes the portraits transcend the typical images of beauty.

Photographers Make Kids' Wildest Dreams Come To Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970876688/970876914" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

'It's Hard To Leave Him': 'Sympathizer' Spy Story Continues In 'The Committed'

Viet Thanh Nguyen's Pulitzer Prize-winning spy novel The Sympathizer told the story of a communist double agent just after the Vietnam War — his quest for revolution resumes in The Committed.

'It's Hard To Leave Him': 'Sympathizer' Spy Story Continues In 'The Committed'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971805668/972057000" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

CalFire Captain Matt Newberry has been fighting fire for more than two decades, but he and his crew hit a wall last year. Climate change is increasing the frequency, intensity and range of wildfires, putting psychological strain on those tasked with trying to contain them. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Talia Herman for NPR

As Fires Worsen, A Mental Health Crisis For Those Battling Them

Wildfires are burning more frequently and intensely in a warming world, making them harder to put out. Some fire agencies are expanding support as they see increased cases of anxiety and depression.

Senate parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough, second from left, works beside then-Vice President Mike Pence earlier this year during the certification of Electoral College ballots in the presidential election, in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol. Shortly afterward, the Capitol was stormed by rioters determined to disrupt the certification. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Who Is The Senate Parliamentarian Who Ruled Against A Minimum Wage Increase?

The parliamentarian is often called the referee of arcane Senate rules. MacDonough has been thrust into the spotlight for ruling against adding a minimum wage hike to the coronavirus relief package.

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

TDC video carousel

New and exclusive videos from the popular concert series.

more from