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A woman wearing a protective mask walks past a sign in a cosmetic shop window on March 17, 2020 in London, England. Leon Neal/Getty Images hide caption

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Leon Neal/Getty Images

These are the 5 things needed to stabilize the pandemic in Europe, WHO expert says

The omicron variant has added a lot of uncertainty to the trajectory of the pandemic. Dr. Hans Kluge, the WHO regional director for Europe, has what he calls five pandemic stabilizers that could help.

These are the 5 things needed to stabilize the pandemic in Europe, WHO expert says

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22 tips for 2022: Get creative, even if you aren't feeling inspired

There are lots of benefits to creating art. Experts say if you spend just 10 minutes of random art marking, it will help you kick-start the habit — no creative inspiration required.

22 tips for 2022: Get creative, even if you aren't feeling inspired

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In this photo provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, center, attends a meeting of the Central Committee of the ruling Workers' Party in Pyongyang, North Korea. AP File Photo hide caption

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AP File Photo

North Korea tests more missiles, but experts warn against taking threats at face value

Monday's test was North Korea's fourth launch in under two weeks. By contrast, it took the North 10 months to conduct that many tests last year.

Fruit-eating animals spread the seeds of plants in ecosystems around the world. Their decline means plants could have a harder time finding new habitats as the climate changes. Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/DPA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

To get by in a changing climate, plants need animal poop to carry them to safety

As the climate gets hotter, plants could need to move to new habitats. But animals that eat their fruit and help spread the seeds are disappearing.

Peter Galbraith displays his opposition to a proposal to waive an environmental review of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power plant before renewing the plant's license, Tuesday, June 28, 2016, in Sacramento, Calif. Rich Pedroncelli/AP File Photo hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP File Photo

The U.S. is divided over whether nuclear power is part of the green energy future

Nuclear power is emerging as an answer as states transition away from coal, oil and natural gas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and stave off climate change.

A pedestrian uses an umbrella as they cross Liberty Avenue, in downtown Pittsburgh, as snow begins to fall during a winter storm that will impact the region on Sunday night, Jan. 16, 2022. Alexandra Wimley/AP hide caption

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Alexandra Wimley/AP

Thousands in northeast are without power after heavy snowfall from winter storm

Homes and businesses across New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania were without power as a dangerous storm brought heavy snow, strong thunderstorms and blustery winds.

The Villa Aurora, a palace in Rome housing the only mural by Caravaggio and at the center of a messy legal battle between a Texas-born princess and the sons of her late husband, an Italian prince, will go up for auction on Jan. 18, 2022. Laurent Emmanuel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Laurent Emmanuel/AFP via Getty Images

An epic inheritance fight will soon cost a Texas-born princess her 16th century villa

After years of legal wrangling, the sprawling Roman villa filled with masterpieces from antiquity to the Renaissance will hit the auction block Tuesday with a starting price of $534 million.

An employee of Sotheby's Dubai presents a 555.55 Carat Black Diamond called "The Enigma" on Monday that will be auctioned at Sotheby's Dubai gallery, in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Kamran Jebreili/AP hide caption

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Kamran Jebreili/AP

Sotheby's unveils 555.55-carat black diamond thought to come from outer space

Black diamonds are extremely rare, and are found naturally only in Brazil and Central Africa. The cosmic origin theory of "The Enigma" is based on carbon isotopes and high hydrogen content.

Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

A behavioral scientist's advice for changing your life

When's the best time to start a new habit? And what makes some stick while others fall by the wayside? Behavioral scientist Katy Milkman's new book, How to Change, breaks down the research about how to leverage human nature instead of working against it to achieve your goals.

A behavioral scientist's advice for changing your life

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Reporter Chloe Veltman reacts to hearing her digital voice double, "Chloney," for the first time, with Speech Morphing chief linguist Mark Seligman. Courtesy of Speech Morphing hide caption

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Courtesy of Speech Morphing

Send in the clones: using artificial intelligence to digitally replicate human voices

Thanks to advances in artificial intelligence, it's never been easier or more affordable to make a perfect facsimile of a human voice: a celebrity, a world leader or even a public-radio reporter.

Send in the clones: Using artificial intelligence to digitally replicate human voices

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A man wearing a face mask to curb the spread of coronavirus, sits on a bench as pedestrians walk outside Evangelismos hospital in Athens, Greece, Monday, Jan. 17, 2022. Thanassis Stavrakis/AP hide caption

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Thanassis Stavrakis/AP

In Greece, unvaccinated people ages 60 and up now face monthly fines

The nation imposed the new mandate on Monday as it looks to bring its vaccination rate closer in line with the EU average. The unvaccinated will face penalties starting at 50 euros, or roughly $57.

A man cries over his mother's grave in the Nossa Senhora Aparecida cemetery, in Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, on Sept. 29, 2020. Iris Gonçalves Alves died at age 54 the previous day from COVID-19, according to the information on her burial record. During the worst times of the pandemic in Manaus, only three relatives could attend a burial in its cemeteries. Raphael Alves hide caption

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Raphael Alves

What happens when isolation goes beyond a pandemic

Photographer Raphael Alves documented how socioeconomic issues worsen the COVID-19 pandemic in the state of Amazonas, Brazil.

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