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Dissident journalist Raman Pratasevich speaks in a video from a detention center in Minsk, Belarus, in June 2021 after being taken into custody after the flight he was on was diverted by Belarusian officials. ONT (OHT)/AP file photo hide caption

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ONT (OHT)/AP file photo

U.S. charges Belarus officials with air piracy in reporter's arrest

U.S. prosecutors say Belarusian officials diverted a flight to Minsk so they could arrest opposition activist and journalist Raman Pratasevich on charges of inciting riots against the government.

MRSA, depicted above in yellow and surrounded by cellular debris, is the name of a staph bacteria that resists treatment by many common antibiotics. The image is from a scanning electron micrograph. MRSA stands for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. NIH/NAID/IMAGE.FR/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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NIH/NAID/IMAGE.FR/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Why humans are losing the race against superbugs

A new report in The Lancet finds that in 2019, antibiotic resistant bacteria killed 1.2 million people — more than were killed by malaria or HIV/AIDS. The problem is mounting in lower income nations.

A resident receives a dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a health center in Jakarta, Indonesia, on Jan. 13. This week, Indonesia started a program to give booster shots to the elderly and people at risk of severe disease. Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dimas Ardian/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Booster longevity: Data reveals how long a third shot protects

Now researchers in the U.K. have the first estimates for how long a third shot of the Pfizer vaccine will last. The findings are mixed.

Booster longevity: Data reveals how long a third shot protects

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22 tips for 2022: You can't please everyone. Here's how to say "no" and stick with it

It can be tempting to say yes to things you just don't want to do if it means avoiding conflict. It turns out a common mistake is giving too much of an explanation or being over-apologetic.

22 tips for 2022: You can't please everyone. Here's how to say 'no' and stick with it

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May Nast arrives for dinner at RiverWalk, an independent senior housing facility, in New York, April 1, 2021. COVID-19 infections are soaring again at U.S. nursing homes because of the omicron wave, and deaths are climbing too. That's leading to new restrictions on family visits and a renewed push to get more residents and staff members vaccinated and boosted. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

The nursing home staffing crisis right now is like nothing we've seen before

COVID cases and deaths are rising again in nursing homes across the country due to the highly contagious omicron variant. Staffing shortages are adding to strain and workers report "moral distress."

President Biden planned to talk about infrastructure on the anniversary of his inauguration. But first, he had to clean up some comments he had made about Russia and Ukraine. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

How Biden is trying to clean up his comments about Russia and Ukraine

President Biden said there was uncertainty among allies about how they would respond to a "minor incursion" by Russia into Ukraine. That led to alarm overseas — and a clean-up at home.

This stock image shows a baby and father playing at home. New research finds that babies judge the relationship between two people by whether or not they willingly share saliva. freemixer/Getty Images hide caption

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freemixer/Getty Images

Even babies and toddlers know that swapping saliva is a sure sign of love

For infants, toddlers, and children, one sign of an especially close relationship is if two people do something that involves exchanging saliva, like taking bites from the same piece of food.

WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 18: Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks during a news conference following a Senate democratic caucus meeting on voting rights and the filibuster on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022 in Washington, DC. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Imag

Schumer insists failed votes on voting rights and filibuster were right thing to do

The Senate majority leader downplayed the risks of holding such a public demonstration of the rift within his caucus ahead of the midterm elections.

Keya Pandey, returning to campus from winter break, is concerned her peer group isn't taking the pandemic seriously enough. Carlos Moreno/KCUR 89.3 hide caption

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News

20-somethings aren't waiting out another round of COVID-19

KCUR 89.3

They're getting vaccinated, even boosted, because they care about their grandparents and parents. But some young adults say the pandemic has interrupted their school, work and social life too much already and they need to get back to living their lives.

Zara Rutherford, 19, carries the Belgian and British flags on the tarmac after landing her Shark ultralight plane at the Kortrijk airport in Belgium, on Thursday at the completion of a record-breaking solo circumnavigation. Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP hide caption

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Geert Vanden Wijngaert/AP

19-year-old lands in Belgium, becoming youngest woman to fly solo around the world

Zara Rutherford set off from Belgium in August to circle the globe in her Shark UL plane. Five months later, she landed back home, having landed in 41 countries on five continents.

Cynthia Chavez Lamar will become the director of the National Museum of the American Indian. She'll be the first Native woman to lead a Smithsonian museum. Walter Lamar/The Smithsonian hide caption

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Walter Lamar/The Smithsonian

Cynthia Chavez Lamar becomes the first Native woman to lead a Smithsonian museum

She will oversee the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., as well as the George Gustav Heye Center in Lower Manhattan and the Cultural Resources Center in Suitland, Md.

Scaffolding and tarp surround the remnants of the equestrian statue of former President Theodore Roosevelt at the entrance to the American Museum of Natural History in New York City on Wednesday. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

New York City's natural history museum has removed its Theodore Roosevelt statue

New York City's American Museum of Natural History began the process of removing the controversial statue from its entrance on Tuesday night. It will be shipped to North Dakota in the coming weeks.

A flag of the International Committee of the Red Cross flutters above the humanitarian organization's headquarters in Geneva on Sept. 29, 2021. The ICRC is pleading with hackers to keep stolen data confidential. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

Cyberattack on Red Cross compromised sensitive data on over 515,000 vulnerable people

The attack targeted a contractor in Switzerland that was storing the data. The Red Cross has been forced to halt a program that reunites families torn apart by violence, migration or other tragedies.

Lisala Folau (wearing blue printed shirt) says he swam for more than 24 hours after getting swept to sea by Saturday's tsunami, sits with other people of Atata island in Nuku'alofa, Tonga, on Wednesday in this picture obtained from social media. Marian Kupu/Broadcom Broadcasting FM87.5/via Reuters hide caption

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Marian Kupu/Broadcom Broadcasting FM87.5/via Reuters

A Tongan man says he swam for more than 24 hours after a tsunami swept him out to sea

Lisala Folau told a local broadcaster about his swimming journey, which lasted more than a day and took him to three islands. Social media users hearing his story are calling him "real-life Aquaman."

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