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From left, Greta Gerwig as Babette, Raffey Cassidy as Denise, May Nivola as Steffie, Sam Nivola as Heinrich and Adam Driver as Jack in White Noise. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

Director Noah Baumbach tackles misinformation in 'White Noise,' wryly

Film director Noah Baumbach speaks with NPR's Steven Inskeep about his latest film, "White Noise," based on the 1985 Don DeLillo novel of the same name

Director Noah Baumbach tackles misinformation in 'White Noise,' wryly

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A rare recording of Phinney's Rainbow — thought to be the first produced musical of Stephen Sondheim (shown here as a wizened showbiz veteran of 32, with three Broadway musicals under his belt) — has been found on a bookshelf in Milwaukee. Michael Hardy/Express/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Hardy/Express/Getty Images

A rare recording of a musical by an 18-year-old Stephen Sondheim surfaces

Broadway-legend-in-training Stephen Sondheim was a college sophomore in 1948 when his musical Phinney's Rainbow was produced — and recorded — at Williams College in Massachusetts.

The Royal Mint Court office complex, bought by the Chinese government for 255 million pounds ($311 million) in May 2018, in London, on Friday. China's controversial plan to build a new embassy on the site near the Tower of London was rejected in a Tower Hamlets council meeting on Thursday. Hollie Adams/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Hollie Adams/Bloomberg/Getty Images

London says no to a big Chinese Embassy, in a blow to Beijing ties

Local officials in London rejected plans for a massive, new Chinese Embassy, a bitter setback for China's government that once promised a "golden age" for its British relations.

Axel Cox, 24, of Gulfport, Miss., was charged with violating the Fair Housing Act after burning a cross in front of a Black family because of their race. Mississippi Department of Corrections via AP hide caption

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Mississippi Department of Corrections via AP

A man who burned a cross to intimidate his Black neighbors pleads guilty to hate crime

Axel Cox, 24, of Gulfport, Miss., who burned a cross in his front yard, was charged with violating the Fair Housing Act over the December 2020 incident.

Anish Adhikari, now 26, worked construction jobs in Qatar for 33 months in the lead-up to the World Cup. In this 2021 photo, he poses inside the new Lusail stadium, which he helped build and which will host the World Cup final on Dec. 18. Adhikari says the Nepali agent who got him the job misled him about working conditions in Qatar: "They sell a dream that's not reality." Anish Adhikari hide caption

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Anish Adhikari

Death and dishonesty: Stories of two workers who built the World Cup stadiums in Qatar

Vinod Kumar of India and Anish Adhikari of Nepal are among the many migrant workers who helped build the stadiums. Adhikari says he was misled about working conditions. Kumar died on the job.

Death and dishonesty: Stories of two workers who built the World Cup stadiums in Qatar

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Freight rail cars sit in a rail yard in Wilmington, California, on November 22, 2022. This week, President Biden urged Congress to pass legislation to prevent a rail strike that could have brought trains to a halt nationwide. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Some rail workers say Biden 'turned his back on us' in his deal to avert a rail strike

With a strike looming, President Biden called on Congress to pass legislation imposing a contract deal that four rail unions had rejected, citing its lack of paid sick days.

Jacob Wohl, pictured here surrounded by police officers at a 2020 protest in Washington D.C., is one of two right-wing activists who were behind a 2020 robocall scheme that targeted minority voters. Wohl will now face probation, fines and 500 hours of voter registration assistance for pleading guilty to telecommunications fraud. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

They ran a right-wing voter suppression scheme. Now they're sentenced to register voters

Jacob Wohl and Jack Burkman robocalled roughly 85,000 voters across five states, falsely telling them that voting by mail would risk "giving your private information to the man."

Director Julia Reichert attends the 2019 Nantucket Film Festival in Massachusetts. Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for the 2019 Nantucket Film Festival hide caption

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Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for the 2019 Nantucket Film Festival

Julia Reichert, an Oscar-winning leader in independent U.S. documentaries, dies

WYSO

The former WYSO host explored the stories of ordinary, working class people in relationship to gender, social-economic class, activism and race in America. Her films included American Factory and The Last Truck.

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends an event via video on Wednesday. The Kremlin is downplaying the prospect of Ukraine peace talks after President Biden said he would speak to Putin if "he's looking for a way to end the war." Mikhail Metzel/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mikhail Metzel/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

Putin turns down talks with Biden and defends Russian attacks on Ukraine's energy grid

The Kremlin dismissed the idea of talks with President Biden to end the war in Ukraine and said its assault on Ukrainian infrastructure was an "inevitable" response to Kyiv's attacks.

Rescued chickens gather in an aviary at Farm Sanctuary's Southern California Sanctuary on Oct. 5 in Acton, Calif. A wave of the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian flu has entered Southern California, driven by wild bird migration. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

What we know about the deadliest U.S. bird flu outbreak in history

The U.S. is enduring its worst poultry health disaster, with some 52.7 million birds dead. Unlike another recent outbreaks, this one has lasted through the summer — and it's still going strong.

Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., and Vice Chair Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., preside over a House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack hearing in October. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Jan. 6 panel meets to mull potential criminal referrals for Trump, others

The House Select Jan. 6 panel will wrap up its investigation on Dec. 31. It's now in a race to issue its final recommendations and findings in the coming weeks.

An oil tanker is moored at the Sheskharis complex, part of Chernomortransneft JSC, a subsidiary of Transneft PJSC, in Novorossiysk, Russia, Oct. 11, one of the largest facilities for oil and petroleum products in southern Russia. The deadline is looming for Western allies to agree on a price cap on Russia oil. AP hide caption

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AP

What to know about the West's new efforts to slash Russia's oil revenue

Plans take effect next week that would ban most Russian oil imports from Europe and put a price cap on the oil going elsewhere. But Russia could still make money off oil to fund its war in Ukraine.

A builder sands the body of a guitar at the Fender factory, in Corona, California, on October 6, 2022. Industries sensitive to rising interest rates have been slowing hiring. VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images

Job market cooled only slightly last month, as employers added 263,000 jobs

Hiring slowed slightly in November amid rising interest rates. But the U.S. job market remains unusually tight. Employers added 263,000 jobs in November while unemployment held steady at 3.7%.

The U.S. gained 263,000 jobs last month. It's good news for workers, but not the Fed

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Brahim Sakine? Seid Mahamat Adam hide caption

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Seid Mahamat Adam

A new kind of climate refugee is emerging

They flee their homes not solely because of climactic changes that make it difficult to earn a living but also because of violence sparked by the competition for dwindling resources.

A new kind of climate refugee is emerging

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A federal appeals court says a lower court must dismiss the case filed by former President Donald Trump challenging the court-ordered search of his Mar-a-Lago estate, seen here in August. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Appeals court halts the Mar-a-Lago special master review

The ruling removes a hurdle the Justice Department said delayed its criminal investigation into the retention of top-secret government information at former President Donald Trump's Florida estate.

Crosses, flowers and other memorabilia form a make-shift memorial for the victims of the shootings at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Uvalde survivors file a $27 billion class-action lawsuit against police and others

Parents, teachers, school staff and students who were on scene the day of the shooting are demanding redress for "the indelible and forever-lasting trauma" caused by the failures of law enforcement.

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa responds to questions in Parliament Cape Town, South Africa, on Sept. 29, 2022, where he denied allegations of money laundering while being questioned over a scandal that threatens his position and the direction of Africa's most developed economy. Nardus Engelbrecht/AP hide caption

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Nardus Engelbrecht/AP

South Africa's leader faces calls to resign over charges of cash stuffed in couches

The calls for South African President Cyril Ramaphosa to resign follow allegations that Ramaphosa tried to conceal the theft of a huge sum of cash stuffed into couches at his farm in 2020.

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