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Hindu devotees bathe in the Ganges River in January at the Kumbh Mela festival in Prayagraj, formerly known as Allahabad. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

India Is Changing Some Cities' Names, And Muslims Fear Their Heritage Is Being Erased

Officials have been altering names to become more Hinducentric. "It is very dangerous for national integrity and unity," says a historian. The changes accelerated ahead of this year's elections.

India Is Changing Some Cities' Names, And Muslims Fear Their Heritage Is Being Erased

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Pedestrians walk in Brooklyn on an unseasonably warm afternoon in February 2017, when temperatures reached near 60 degrees. To take action against climate change, New York City is requiring large buildings to retrofit their structures to improve energy efficiency. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

To Fight Climate Change, New York City Will Push Skyscrapers To Slash Emissions

A law — the first in the world — will require retrofits of large buildings, with a price tag in the billions. Buildings are responsible for about 70% of the city's greenhouse gas emissions.

To Fight Climate Change, New York City Will Push Skyscrapers To Slash Emissions

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Damaged power lines hang over a street following Hurricane Irma hit in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands on Sept. 10, 2017. The storm ravaged such lush resort islands as St. Martin, St. Barts, St. Thomas, Barbuda and Anguilla. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AP

After 2 Hurricanes, A 'Floodgate' Of Mental Health Issues In The Virgin Islands

The new governor of the U.S. Virgin Islands has issued a territory-wide mental health state of emergency, after two hurricanes in 2017 caused widespread trauma and stress among islanders.

Dr. Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung of Cameroon, who was killed on Friday in the attack on an Ebola response command center in Democratic Republic of the Congo. DRC Ministry of Health & WHO hide caption

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DRC Ministry of Health & WHO

The Doctor Killed In Friday's Ebola Attack Was Dedicated ... But Also Afraid

Dr. Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung of Cameroon arrived in the Democratic Republic of the Congo just four weeks ago – and was increasingly worried about his safety.

The Doctor Killed In Friday's Ebola Attack Was Dedicated ... But Also Afraid

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The U.S. Supreme Court will take up three cases that hinge on federal discrimination laws and whether they protect LGBTQ workers when its new term begins in October. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Supreme Court Will Hear Cases On LGBTQ Discrimination Protections For Employees

The court is poised to decide whether Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 applies to sexual orientation and gender identity, along with factors such as race, religion, sex and national origin.

Kurt Cobain in the studio with Nirvana in late 1991. Michel Linssen/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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Michel Linssen/Redferns/Getty Images

'Smells Like Teen Spirit,' The Anthem For A Generation That Didn't Want One

Nirvana's culture-shifting hit mocked mainstream rock songs and wound up becoming one. But in his very ambivalence about success, Kurt Cobain captured something essential about growing up.

'Smells Like Teen Spirit,' The Anthem For A Generation That Didn't Want One

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An Egyptian soldier and a policeman stand guard at a Cairo polling station on Monday, the third day of a referendum on constitutional amendments. Khaled Desouki /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki /AFP/Getty Images

Egypt Approves Constitutional Changes That Could Keep Sissi In Office Until 2030

The amendments, which were approved by nearly 90% of voters, further entrench the power of the military and extend the power of Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi.

How do you tell the good parenting advice from the bad? When producer Selena Simmons-Duffin's daughter was ready to start solid food, her parents encountered wildly conflicting advice about what to feed her. Selena Simons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simons-Duffin/NPR

Drowning In Parenting Advice? Here's Some Advice For That

In her new book Cribsheet, economist Emily Oster offers a lifeline to parents overwhelmed by contradictory parenting guidance. She offers a data-driven, and common-sense, approach to raising a baby.

Arvada Traffic Enforcement Officer R.J. Everett chalks tires in Arvada, Colo in 2014. Physically marking a tire without a warrant is a violation of the Fourth Amendment, a federal appeals court ruled. Kent Nishimura/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Denver Post via Getty Images

Court Says Using Chalk On Tires For Parking Enforcement Violates Constitution

Physically marking a tire without a warrant is a violation of the Fourth Amendment, a federal appeals court ruled. The amendment protects people from unreasonable searches and seizures.

Steven T. Johnson rents a bed at the PodShare in Hollywood, Calif. "When you don't own things, you don't have to keep track of them," he says. "You just show up." Courtesy of Steven Johnson hide caption

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Courtesy of Steven Johnson

The Affluent Homeless: A Sleeping Pod, A Hired Desk And A Handful Of Clothes

Many young people participate in the rental economy. They own less stuff than their parents' generation, and rent or share a lot more. For some it's a choice; for others a necessity.

A resident looks at the rubble of St. Catherine church on Tuesday, including the toppled head of a statue, following a 6.1 magnitude earthquake in Pampanga province northwest of Manila the previous day. Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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Bullit Marquez/AP

2 Earthquakes Shake The Philippines; At Least 16 Dead

Rescuers continue to search for survivors of Monday's quake, which trapped people in a collapsed supermarket in Pampanga province and caused panicked office workers to flee buildings in Manila.

Glenda Jackson plays the title role in Shakespeare's King Lear on Broadway. Jackson still gets nervous after decades on stage because she knows how "easy it is to act really badly, and how very, very hard it is to act well." Bridget Lacombe hide caption

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Bridget Lacombe

Glenda Jackson On Playing King Lear: Gender Barriers 'Crack' With Age

Fresh Air

The 82-year-old British actor is currently playing Shakespeare's famed tragic figure on Broadway. "Doors have opened for women that were firmly locked many decades ago," she says.

Glenda Jackson On Playing King Lear: Gender Barriers 'Crack' With Age

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Former Vice President Joe Biden leaves after addressing striking workers at the Stop & Shop in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston on April 18. He's expected to launch a presidential campaign within days. Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Democrats Consider: Is A Straight, White Man The Safe Bet Against Trump?

Six months after electing a diverse wave of women to Congress, "electability"-minded Democrats fear the country isn't ready for a woman, person of color or LGBTQ presidential candidate.

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