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The nonprofit Code for America is using computer algorithms to help California prosecutors comply with clearing criminal records of certain marijuana convictions. Josh Edelson/AP hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AP

Algorithm Targets Marijuana Convictions Eligible To Be Cleared

California district attorneys are using an algorithm to expunge some 85,000 marijuana-related convictions. The tech identifies eligible cases, allowing prosecutors to comply with Prop 64.

Algorithm Targets Marijuana Convictions Eligible To Be Cleared

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Andrew Downs, senior regional director for the southern region of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy, stands at the approximate spot where the pipeline would cross underground. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Sullivan/NPR

Supreme Court Pipeline Fight Could Disrupt How The Appalachian Trail Is Run

The Appalachian Trail is at the center of a legal case before the Supreme Court on Monday involving a proposed gas pipeline. Trail officials say it has become a football between the case's two sides.

Supreme Court Pipeline Fight Could Disrupt How The Appalachian Trail Is Run

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Whitney Houston photographed at the World Music Awards in 2004. Starting Feb. 25, a concert show starring a hologram of Houston, who died in 2012, will tour Europe. Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images hide caption

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Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

'An Evening With Whitney' Hologram Tour Trades On The Image Of A Complicated Star

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Jason King of New York University about the surge in hologram tours and what the ethical implications are of recreating the image of Whitney Houston.

'An Evening With Whitney' Hologram Tour Trades On The Image Of A Complicated Star

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Noah Centineo and Lana Condor negotiate life as an established couple in To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You Bettina Strauss/Netflix hide caption

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Bettina Strauss/Netflix

'To All The Boys' Star Noah Centineo Has An 'Inner Mr. Potato Head'

Centineo returns as possibly-perfect boyfriend Peter Kavinsky in To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You. He says meditation — and doodling cartoon characters — has helped him keep a sense of self.

'To All The Boys' Star Noah Centineo Has An 'Inner Mr. Potato Head'

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K. L. Ricks for NPR

A Strange And Bitter Crop

Eighty-five years ago, a crowd of several thousand white people gathered in Jackson County, Florida, to participate in the lynching of a man named Claude Neal. The poet L. Lamar Wilson grew up there, but didn't learn about Claude Neal until he was working on a research paper in high school. When he heard the story, he knew he had to do something.

A Strange And Bitter Crop

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Riek Machar (left) shares a smile with South Sudan's president, Salva Kiir, after a swearing-in ceremony Saturday in the capital, Juba. Observers hope their newly forged coalition spells an end to civil war. Stringer/AP hide caption

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Stringer/AP

South Sudan Forges Unity Government, Renewing Fragile Hope For Peace

President Salva Kiir swore in his rival, rebel leader Riek Machar, as vice president on Saturday. The landmark deal could spell an end to years of violence, but it's not their first attempt.

Abdullah, 13, lost his left leg when he stepped on an improvised explosive device. He takes a break from walking practice at the International Committee of the Red Cross physical rehabilitation center in Kabul on Dec. 1, 2019. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

More Than 10,000 Civilians Injured Or Killed In Afghanistan Last Year, U.N. Says

For the sixth year in a row, more than 10,000 civilians were killed or injured in armed conflict in Afghanistan, according to the United Nations. Total casualties in the past decade topped 100,000.

Open Book, by Jessica Simpson Dey Street Books hide caption

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Dey Street Books

Jessica Simpson Talks Of Alcohol Abuse, Finding Herself Again In Memoir 'Open Book'

"There's never been a moment in my life that I've been more honest with myself," the pop singer tells NPR. "I finally feel free of everything that I was holding secret and holding to myself."

Jessica Simpson Talks Of Alcohol Abuse, Finding Herself Again In Memoir 'Open Book'

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Eric Tucker painted the everyday people in his hometown of Warrington, England — like this smoker in a pub. Tony Longmore hide caption

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Tony Longmore

'Unseen Artist' Eric Tucker Spent Decades Painting — But Nobody Knew

Boxer and laborer Eric Tucker created hundreds of paintings of his home town — and kept them secret, stashed around his house. Now, almost two years after his death, he has a museum exhibition.

'Unseen Artist' Eric Tucker Spent Decades Painting — But Nobody Knew

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Satellite images show the effects of a prolonged warm spell on Eagle Island, in the far north of the Antarctic Peninsula, NASA says. An inch of snowpack melted in just one day, the agency says. The blue areas in snow on the right are ponds of melted water. NASA hide caption

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NASA

'Antarctica Melts,' NASA Says, Showing Effects Of A Record Warm Spell

Taken just nine days apart, two images illustrate the impact a recent warm period had on the Antarctic Peninsula. NASA says such warmth "has become more common in recent years."

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