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This combination of photos shows clockwise from top left the logos for Toyota, Honda, Kia, Fiat Chrysler, Mitsubishi and Hyundai. U.S. auto safety regulators have expanded an investigation into malfunctioning air bag controls to include 12.3 million vehicles because the bags may not inflate in a crash. AP hide caption

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AP

Government Expands Air Bag Investigation To Include More Than 12 Million Vehicles

A component responsible for detecting a crash and deploying air bags has been malfunctioning due to electrical interference, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration says.

An exterior view of H&R Block is shown in Sunnyvale, Calif., in 2006. Co-founder Henry Bloch died Tuesday at the age of 96. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Henry Bloch, Co-Founder Of H&R Block, Dies At 96

Bloch, along with his brother Richard, started the business as the IRS was phasing out its free tax prep service. They changed the "h" in their last name to a "k" so it would be easier to pronounce.

Henry Bloch, Co-Founder Of H&R Block, Dies At 96

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Sociology professor Chan Kin-man (left), law professor Benny Tai (center), and Baptist minister Chu Yiu-ming (right) chant slogans before entering the West Kowloon Magistrates Court in Hong Kong on Wednesday to receive their sentences after being convicted on "public nuisance" charges for their role in organizing mass pro-democracy protests in 2014. Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Wallace/AFP/Getty Images

'Umbrella' Protesters Sentenced For 2014 Hong Kong Pro-Democracy Demonstration

A judge sentenced the leaders of the protests to up to 16 months in prison. Rights groups said the sentencing would have a chilling effect on future demonstrations in Hong Kong.

Many backyard chicken keepers are thinking less about the business of raising chickens and more about collecting them — you just have to have them all — which comes with predictable consequences: too many eggs. Maarigard/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley Collection hide caption

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Maarigard/Getty Images/Dorling Kindersley Collection

Too Many Eggs For One Basket! Backyard Chicken Farmers Scramble To Give Them Away

Some food pantries are benefiting from home chicken keepers' desire to keep collecting the birds as pets, which results in more eggs than they can handle. But sometimes it can be hard to find takers.

Demonstrators gather during a protest outside the Jesuit-run Central American University in Managua, Nicaragua. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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Arnulfo Franco/AP

'Pray For Me': Nicaraguan Priest Threatened With Death Reaches Out To Niece In U.S.

The private Jesuit university in Managua, Nicaragua, where priest Chepe Idiáquez works is one of a series of Catholic institutions that have been attacked, as the country's yearlong unrest continues.

'Pray For Me': Nicaraguan Priest Threatened With Death Reaches Out To Niece In U.S.

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This year, Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg is making the same argument Republicans have for years: that a vote based on Christian values would turn the country around. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

How Would Jesus Vote?

Mayor Pete Buttigieg says Christian faith leads in a "progressive" political direction. Conservatives disagree. The debate reshapes old questions about the relation between religion and politics.

How Would Jesus Vote?

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In Massachusetts last July, several Franklin County Jail inmates, seated, were watched by a nurse (left) and a corrections officer after receiving their daily doses of buprenorphine, a drug that helps control opioid cravings. By some estimates, at least half to two thirds of today's U.S. jail population has a substance use or dependence problem. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

County Jails Struggle With A New Role As America's Prime Centers For Opioid Detox

The National Sheriffs' Association has published a detailed guide to jail-based medication-assisted treatment. States hardest hit by opioids are moving fastest to get inmates the help needed to quit.

County Jails Struggle With A New Role As America's Prime Centers For Opioid Detox

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Kevin Biely, 37 and Kat McClain, 28, on their wedding day in Las Vegas. In 2017, NPR documented their first date, which was set up by a matchmaker. Courtesy of Cahsman Photo hide caption

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Courtesy of Cahsman Photo

A Love Story That Began With A Matchmaker And A First Date On NPR

In 2017, NPR documented the first date of a couple paired by a professional matchmaker, for a story about modern dating. A year after their first date, the couple got engaged, and they recently wed.

A Love Story That Began With A Matchmaker And A First Date On NPR

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World's First Malaria Vaccine Launches In Sub-Saharan Africa

It took more than 30 years to develop. The hope is it will eventually save tens of thousands of lives each year. But there are a few issues.

World's First Malaria Vaccine Launches In Sub-Saharan Africa

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Damaged power lines hang over a street following Hurricane Irma hit in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands on Sept. 10, 2017. The storm ravaged such lush resort islands as St. Martin, St. Barts, St. Thomas, Barbuda and Anguilla. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AP

After 2 Hurricanes, A 'Floodgate' Of Mental Health Issues In The Virgin Islands

The new governor of the U.S. Virgin Islands has issued a territory-wide mental health state of emergency, after two hurricanes in 2017 caused widespread trauma and stress among islanders.

An Egyptian soldier and a policeman stand guard at a Cairo polling station on Monday, the third day of a referendum on constitutional amendments. Khaled Desouki /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki /AFP/Getty Images

Egypt Approves Constitutional Changes That Could Keep Sissi In Office Until 2030

The amendments, which were approved by nearly 90% of voters, further entrench the power of the military and extend the power of Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi.

How do you tell the good parenting advice from the bad? When producer Selena Simmons-Duffin's daughter was ready to start solid food, her parents encountered wildly conflicting advice about what to feed her. Selena Simons-Duffin/NPR hide caption

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Selena Simons-Duffin/NPR

Drowning In Parenting Advice? Here's Some Advice For That

In her new book Cribsheet, economist Emily Oster offers a lifeline to parents overwhelmed by contradictory parenting guidance. She offers a data-driven, and common-sense, approach to raising a baby.

Hindu devotees bathe in the Ganges River in January at the Kumbh Mela festival in Prayagraj, formerly known as Allahabad. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

India Is Changing Some Cities' Names, And Muslims Fear Their Heritage Is Being Erased

Officials have been altering names to become more Hinducentric. "It is very dangerous for national integrity and unity," says a historian. The changes accelerated ahead of this year's elections.

India Is Changing Some Cities' Names, And Muslims Fear Their Heritage Is Being Erased

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