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President Biden meets with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on the sidelines of the G-7 summit. A White House official said Biden did a lot of "diplomatic speed-dating" with world leaders. Official Photo/Getty Images hide caption

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Official Photo/Getty Images

Biden Spends The Weekend Trying To Persuade G-7 Leaders To Push Back On China

President Biden has said China poses one of the biggest strategic challenges to the United States. At the G-7, he's tried to convince key allies to help push back against Beijing.

From The Archives

A man holds a portrait of Amanda Alvear at a vigil for the victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Remembering The Pulse Nightclub Victims, 5 Years Later

Five years ago this weekend, 49 people were killed and 53 injured in a mass shooting in Orlando. The victims ranged in age from 18 to 50. They were dancers and students, a singer and a bouncer, an accountant and an aspiring firefighter — mothers, fathers, teenagers, couples and best friends.

As ransomware cases surge, the cyber criminals almost almost always demand, and receive, payment in cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin. The world's largest meat supplier, JBS, announced paid $11 million in Bitcoin to hackers in a recent ransomware attack. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

Bitcoin Is Fueling Ransomware Attacks

If you're planning a multi-million dollar ransomware attack, there's really only one way to collect — with cryptocurrency. It's fast. It's easy. Best of all, it's largely anonymous and hard to trace.

How Bitcoin Has Fueled Ransomware Attacks

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A pedestrian walks by a "Now Hiring" sign outside of a Lamps Plus store in San Francisco on on June 3. Four states, including Mississippi, are moving to end an extra $300-a-week unemployment benefit, arguing the pay is discouraging people from finding work. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

4 States Are Ending The Extra $300 Per Week Unemployment Benefit

Mississippi, Missouri, Alaska and Iowa are ending the extra $300-a-week unemployment benefit provided as part of COVID-19 relief in a controversial bid to get people back to work.

Apple announced this week at its Worldwide Developer Conference a new feature in its forthcoming operating system, iOS 15, that will digitize state-issued licensees and ID cards. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Apple iPhones Can Soon Hold Your ID. Privacy Experts Say There's A Cost For The Convenience

Apple announced a new feature to let users scan their driver's license and save it to their iPhones. Some experts says it could invite greater surveillance and data tracking, as well as incentivize businesses to ask customers to prove who they are.

Apple iPhones Can Soon Hold Your ID. Privacy Experts Are On Edge

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Participants sit a Blue Origin space simulator during a conference on robotics and artificial intelligence in Las Vegas on June 5, 2019. On Saturday, Blue Origin announced that an unidentified bidder will pay $28 million for a suborbital flight on the company's New Shepard vehicle. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

An 11-Minute Flight To Space With Jeff Bezos Was Just Auctioned For $28 Million

Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos is going up July 20 on a rocket made by his space exploration company Blue Origin. So is his brother. And now a mystery bidder has won an auction to join them.

Amazon Founder and CEO Jeff Bezos came under fire after a ProPublica investigation showed that he received $4,000 in child tax credits in recent years. Bezos is seen here in 2018. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why A Billionaire Can Claim The Child Tax Credit

NPR's Scott Simon ponders the child tax credit, why it was created and why someone as wealthy as Amazon founder Jeff Bezos would get it.

Opinion: On Claiming The Child Tax Credit

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Dr. Aaron Kesselheim (left), a professor at Harvard's medical school, at a documentary film screening on Sept. 28, 2018, in Boston. He has resigned from a Food and Drug Administration advisory panel over the FDA's decision to approve an Alzheimer's drug. Scott Eisen/AP hide caption

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Scott Eisen/AP

3 Experts Have Resigned From An FDA Committee Over The Approval Of An Alzheimer's Drug

In his resignation letter, Dr. Aaron Kesselheim calls it "probably the worst drug approval decision in recent U.S. history." An FDA official says the agency found the benefits outweighed the risks.

Used cars sit on the sales lot at Frank Bent's Wholesale Motors in El Cerrito, Calif., on March 15. Supply chain snarls and pent-up demand are driving up the prices of a lot of things, including new and used cars. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Inflation Is Surging. The Price Of A Toyota Pickup Truck Helps Explain Why

The Labor Department says consumer prices jumped 5% for the 12 months ending in May. That's the sharpest increase in nearly 13 years, as the economy rebounds from the pandemic recession.

Inflation Is Surging. The Price Of A Toyota Pickup Truck Helps Explain Why

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As COVID-19 rates go down and vaccination rates go up, New York City voters increasingly say that crime and public safety are their biggest concerns in the upcoming mayoral election. Scott Roth/AP hide caption

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Scott Roth/AP

Crime Is The Key Issue In New York City Mayor's Race

WNYC Radio

Mayor Bill de Blasio is out at the end of the year because of term limits. Voters will choose from a crowded field of would-be successors, including Andrew Yang, the former Democratic presidential candidate.

Crime Is The Key Issue In New York City Mayor's Race

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An East Texas bakery initially faced backlash over its Pride Month-themed cookies, but is now selling out of its goods and gaining fans across the country. It's also receiving donations and passing them along to local charities. Jens Kalaene/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Jens Kalaene/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

A Texas Bakery Got Hate Mail Over Pride Cookies. Then The Community Rallied Behind It

Confections bakery in Lufkin, Texas, lost customers after posting a picture of its rainbow-iced Pride Month cookies. It's now being flooded with orders and donations, and paying them forward.

Benny (Corey Hawkins), Sonny (Gregory Diaz IV) and Usnavi (Anthony Ramos) chat in Usnavi's Washington Heights bodega. Macall Polay/Warner Bros. hide caption

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Macall Polay/Warner Bros.

How Lin-Manuel Miranda And Quiara Alegría Hudes Assert Dignity With 'In The Heights'

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks with Lin-Manuel Miranda and screenwriter Quiara Alegría Hudes about their new film In the Heights, based off the Tony-award winning musical Miranda created and starred in.

How Lin-Manuel Miranda And Quiara Alegría Hudes Assert Dignity With 'In The Heights'

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Fred Chao for NPR

COMIC: Director Jon M. Chu's Long Journey From Home Videos To 'In The Heights'

Hollywood director Jon M. Chu got his start splicing VHS tapes of home videos, but it took him two decades — and acceptance of his cultural identity — to realize what stories he really wanted to tell.

COMIC: Director Jon M. Chu's Long Journey From Home Videos To 'In The Heights'

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Demonstrators wave the Palestinian flag and chant "Black Lives Matter," among other slogans, during a march ahead of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland in 2016. Adrees Latif/Reuters hide caption

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

The Complicated History Behind BLM's Solidarity With The Pro-Palestinian Movement

After the recent Israel-Hamas fighting, many Black Lives Matter organizers have renewed their support for the Palestinians. A fissure among African American activists in 1967 links the two movements.

The Complicated History Behind BLM's Solidarity With The Pro-Palestinian Movement

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Handy Kennedy, founder of AgriUnity cooperative, feeds his cows on HK Farms earlier this year in Cobbtown, Ga. The AgriUnity cooperative is a group of Black farmers formed to better their chances of economic success. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

U.S. Farmers Of Color Were About To Get Loan Forgiveness. Now The Program Is On Hold

A new federal program created by the Biden administration to reverse years of economic discrimination against U.S. farmers of color has ground to a halt.

Riz Ahmed at the 2021 Academy Awards. Handout/A.M.P.A.S. via Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/A.M.P.A.S. via Getty Images

Just 10% Of Popular Movies Had A Muslim Character. Riz Ahmed Wants To Change That

The Oscar-nominated actor is launching an initiative on Muslim representation in movies, after a new study showed less than 10% of the top films between 2017 and 2019 depicted Muslims on screen.

Just 10% Of Popular Movies Had A Muslim Character. Riz Ahmed Wants To Change That

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Asha Gond (center right) rides her skateboard. When she first began skateboarding, neighbors would catcall that skateboarding is for boys and urge her parents to marry her off. Vicky Roy hide caption

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Vicky Roy

Skateboarding Gives Freedom To Rural Indian Teen In Netflix Film — And In Real Life

A new Netflix movie called Skater Girl chronicles the journey of an Indian teenage girl who discovers a life-changing passion for skateboarding. It's also the story of Asha Gond.

How many oceans are there? It's National Geographic official now: There are five. Alexander Gerst/ESA via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Gerst/ESA via Getty Images

Coming Soon To An Atlas Near You: A Fifth Ocean

National Geographic has recognized the Southern Ocean as the fifth official ocean. The cartographic update doesn't surprise researchers who study the importance of the waters surrounding Antarctica.

Coming Soon To An Atlas Near You: A Fifth Ocean

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The late Rev. Farrell Duncombe (left) spoke with his friend Howard Robinson for a StoryCorps conversation in 2010 about how his role models helped shape him as a leader in his Alabama community. Elizabeth Straight for StoryCorps hide caption

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Elizabeth Straight for StoryCorps

Role Models Like Rosa Parks Shaped A Distracted Kid Into A Leader

At StoryCorps, the Rev. Farrell Duncombe remembered those who nurtured him — like Rosa Parks, his former Sunday school teacher, who joked once that as a kid, "I ain't think you was gonna be nothing."

How Role Models Like Rosa Parks Shaped A Distracted Kid Into A Leader

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Jennifer Gibaldi's daughter Alyssa, 17, began experiencing severe anxiety which left her catatonic during the pandemic last year. But finding help for Alyssa, who has Down syndrome, was challenging, as most health care providers wouldn't take kids with disabilities or they wouldn't take her insurance. Heather Walsh for NPR hide caption

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Heather Walsh for NPR

How A Hospital And A School District Teamed Up To Help Kids In Emotional Crisis

A growing number of kids struggle with anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts. A new way of linking hospitals and schools may be the key to getting more of them help.

How A Hospital And A School District Teamed Up To Help Kids In Emotional Crisis

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Pilgrims walk around the Kaaba at the Grand Mosque in the Muslim holy city of Mecca on July 31, 2020. Saudi Arabia says this year's hajj pilgrimage will be limited to no more than 60,000 people, all of them from within the kingdom. Ministry of Media/AP hide caption

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Ministry of Media/AP

Saudi Arabia Says The Hajj Will Be Limited To 60,000 People, All From Within The Kingdom

This year's pilgrimage, which begins in mid-July, will be limited to people from within the kingdom because of the pandemic. Last year only about 1,000 people were allowed in the hajj, down from about 2 million historically.

Alyson Hurt/NPR

More States Are Scaling Back How Often They Update Their COVID Numbers

More than two dozen states have reduced how frequently they report what's happening with the pandemic, raising alarm among some public health experts.

States Scale Back Pandemic Reporting, Stirring Alarm

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A Froggyland diorama shows a teacher trying to control a class in which students are hitting each other with rulers, arriving late to class and balancing pencils on their noses. Each diorama displays anthropomorphized frogs in human scenes of the early 20th century. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Welcome To Froggyland, The Croatian Taxidermy Museum That May Soon Come To The U.S.

The museum features the work of a Hungarian taxidermist who created anthropomorphized exhibits. It had 50,000 visitors in 2019, but numbers fell during the pandemic and the owner now plans to sell.

Welcome To Froggyland, The Croatian Taxidermy Museum That May Soon Come To The U.S.

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