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The owners of the Stena Impero say the tanker "was approached by unidentified small crafts and a helicopter" as it tried to pass through the Strait of Hormuz Friday. The ship is seen here in an undated photo issued Friday July 19, 2019, by Stena Bulk. Stena Bulk/AP hide caption

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Stena Bulk/AP

Iran Seizes British-Flagged Oil Tanker In Strait Of Hormuz

Ship-tracking data show the U.K. tanker Stena Impero was traveling to a port in Saudi Arabia when it suddenly veered toward Iran's coast. A Liberian-flagged tanker made a similar turn.

The United States Courthouse in Brooklyn, N.Y. An American terror suspect was scheduled to appear there after prosecutors charged him with being a sniper for the Islamic State. Bebeto Matthews/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Trump Administration Repatriates, Charges Citizen Who Allegedly Fought For ISIS

A criminal complaint charging Ruslan Maratovich Asainov was unsealed in New York City; prosecutors say he was a sniper and weapons trainer for the Islamic State in Syria.

Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen with Hugh Hurwitz, left, acting director of the Bureau of Prisons, and David Muhlhausen, director of the National Institute of Justice, at DOJ in Washington. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Thousands Freed From Prison Custody As DOJ Implements Sentencing Reform Law

More than 3,100 are moving out of the Bureau of Prisons system on Friday and the Justice Department is making other changes to comply with a law passed by Congress last year.

Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats testifies before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington on March 6. On Friday he announced a new election security czar for the agency. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Director Of National Intelligence Dan Coats Appoints New Election Security Czar

Spy world veteran Shelby Pierson will attempt to centralize election security efforts across the intelligence community with soon-to-be-designated agency leads.

With a mobile phone, Kenyans can send and receive money via a service called M-PESA. Now Facebook is entering the digital currency realm. The social media giant has helped develop a digital currency called Libra that plans to launch in 2020. Nichole Sobecki for NPR hide caption

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Nichole Sobecki for NPR

Does Facebook Need A Humanitarian Partner For Its New Digital Currency?

The aid group Mercy Corps believes that the new Libra currency could help funnel aid to the poor. But critics wonder why the charity has teamed up with a controversial company.

The Kyoto Animation Studio in Kyoto, Japan, was set ablaze on Thursday morning, killing 33 and injuring more than 30 others before the fire was put out on Friday morning. The suspect believed to be behind the arson has is being treated for burns. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Suspected Arsonist In Japanese Animation Studio Fire Reportedly Had Criminal Record

Police officials said Shinji Aoba, a 41-year-old from Saitama City near Tokyo, spent three and a half years in prison for robbing a convenience store in 2012.

Greg Force and Abby Force at StoryCorps in Greenville, South Carolina. Alletta Cooper/StoryCorps hide caption

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Alletta Cooper/StoryCorps

How A 10-Year-Old-Boy Helped Apollo 11 Return To Earth

Greg Force was just a boy when his father, the director of a NASA tracking station in Guam, called home with an important mission for him: To help the crew of Apollo 11 return safely to Earth.

How A 10-Year-Old-Boy Helped Apollo 11 Return To Earth

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Neil Armstrong tests out his spacesuit and camera in April 1969, three months before he would actually set foot on the moon. NASA/Project Apollo Archive hide caption

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NASA/Project Apollo Archive

Hollywood Shoots The Moon: 117 Years Of Lunar Landings At The Movies

Motion pictures went to the moon long before Apollo 11 did, and they keep going back. Critic Bob Mondello reflects on the many films, from 1902 to today, that have made the journey.

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