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Members of Black Lives Matter of Greater New York and allies hold a protest rally last month in New York City's Times Square demanding justice for Eric Garner, who died after he was put in a chokehold by an NYPD officer in 2014. Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

NYPD Officer Will Not Face Federal Criminal Charges In Eric Garner's Death

Officer Daniel Pantaleo could still face disciplinary action by the New York Police Department. In 2014, Garner's dying words, "I can't breathe" became a rallying cry in national protests.

An alligator that eluded capture for a week in a Chicago park is now in custody, officials announced Tuesday. The gator is seen here in an image provided by Chicago Animal Care and Control. Kelley Gandurski/AP hide caption

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Kelley Gandurski/AP

Chance The Snapper Is Snared: Alligator Caught After A Wild Week In Chicago Park

It took some 36 hours of looking in Humboldt Park's lagoon, but a Florida alligator specialist finally brought in an animal that had become something of a celebrity in Chicago.

From Right: U.S. Reps. Ayanna Pressley, ashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Ilhan Omar listen at a press conference at the Capitol Monday. President Trump has accused the "squad" of four of hating America and has said they should "go back" to where they came from. Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

'He Says Stupid Stuff': Trump Supporters Shrug Off His Racist Tweets

"I think that as negative as he is, and as much as a trouble-maker as he is," says Chris Kennedy, "[Trump] is contributing to a very positive forward momentum."

'He Says Stupid Stuff': Amid Outrage, Trump Supporters Shrug Off Racist Language

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Container ships and other maritime vessels currently run on pollutant-intensive heavy fuel oil. The world's largest container-shipping company, Maersk, has promised to make its operations zero carbon by 2050. Doing so will require using new fuels such as hydrogen. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

The Dawn Of Low-Carbon Shipping

The shipping industry is starting to move away from pollutant-intensive heavy fuel oil. Scientists and private companies are betting on a clean replacement technology: hydrogen fuel cells.

U.S. lawmakers will question lobbyists and officials from Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple on an array of issues. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

Big Tech In The Hot Seat As Congress Probes Monopoly Power, Digital Currency

Lawmakers in the Senate and House will question lobbyists and officials from Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple on an array of issues, including whether they're so big they stifle competition.

Big Tech In The Hot Seat As Congress Probes Monopoly Power, Digital Currency

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Runners make their way through downtown Dallas during the Toyota Rock 'N' Roll Dallas Half Marathon last year. Texas has experience massive population growth in the past decade, but officials there have decided not to spend any money or make statewide plans for the 2020 census. Tom Pennington/Getty Images for Rock 'N' Roll Marathon hide caption

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Tom Pennington/Getty Images for Rock 'N' Roll Marathon

Some Fear Undercount As Texas Decides Not To Spend Money On 2020 Census

KUT 90.5

Despite the fact that the state has experienced massive population growth in the past decade, officials in Texas have decided not to allocate money or make statewide plans for the upcoming census,

Some Fear Undercount As Texas Decides Not To Spend Money On 2020 Census

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Medicare Advantage plans, administered by private insurance firms under contract with Medicare, treat more than 22 million seniors — more than 1 in 3 people on Medicare. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Medicare Advantage Plans Overbill Taxpayers By Billions Annually, Records Show

Kaiser Health News

The federal government wants to deploy several new tools for catching insurers that have overcharged Medicare $30 billion in the past three years alone. But the insurance industry is balking.

A scene in the show 13 Reasons Why that had shown actress Katherine Langford's character taking her own life has been edited out. Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP hide caption

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Richard Shotwell/Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

Netflix Cuts Controversial Suicide Scene From '13 Reasons Why'

The show is centered on the suicide of a teenage girl, and the first season's finale shows her taking her own life. Several organizations raised concerns that it could romanticize suicide.

(Left) The Apollo 11 command and service modules are mated to the Saturn V lunar module adapter. (Right) The Apollo 11 spacecraft command module is loaded aboard a Super Guppy Aircraft at Ellington Air Force Base for shipment to the North American Rockwell Corp. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The Making Of Apollo's Command Module: 2 Engineers Recall Tragedy And Triumph

It was the only part of the Apollo 11 spacecraft that came back from the moon. Designing, testing and building it was a monumental task, according to two engineers who were part of the effort.

The town of Harlech in Wales is officially home to the world's steepest street, according to Guinness World Records. Dea / S. Vannini/De Agostini via Getty Images hide caption

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Dea / S. Vannini/De Agostini via Getty Images

King Of The Hill: Guinness World Records Crowns Wales Street World's Steepest

The town of Harlech in Wales has ousted Dunedin, New Zealand, for the title of world's steepest street. Residents are elated about the title, which required a lengthy verification process.

Musicians walk on a crosswalk painted like a piano Outside the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y. Increasingly, urban designers and transportation planners say this kind of art — colorful crosswalks and engaging sidewalks — leads to safer intersections, stronger neighborhoods, and better public health. Brett Dahlberg/WXXI hide caption

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Brett Dahlberg/WXXI

Walking On Painted Keys: Creative Crosswalks Meet Government Resistance

WXXI News

Intersection art makes streets more inviting and can remind motorists to respect crosswalks and bike lanes. But the federal government says the designs can also be distracting.

Walking On Painted Keys: Creative Crosswalks Meet Government Resistance

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