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Details about the forthcoming assistance for earthquake victims remain vague but a spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency told NPR the funds will be released "on an ongoing basis." Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Puerto Rico Relief: Trump Declares Major Disaster After Series Of Earthquakes

Island officials were quick to thank the president for the designation, which makes residents eligible for more financial assistance from FEMA. They were just told aid for 2017 hurricanes is coming.

Recording Academy President and CEO Deborah Dugan speaks during the 62nd Grammy Awards Nominations Conference at CBS Broadcast Center in November. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Recording Academy CEO Suspended Amid Allegations Of Misconduct

The organization that puts on the annual Grammy Awards says Deborah Dugan has been placed on administrative leave after an allegation of misconduct by a senior female member of the organization.

The two self-funding billionaire candidates, Mike Bloomberg and Tom Steyer, together have spent more on ads than all the other Democratic candidates combined through Jan. 13. Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR hide caption

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Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR

New Figures Show Billionaire Candidates Spending Big, With Little Return

Tom Steyer and Mike Bloomberg have used their own fortunes to outspend other candidates in the Democratic primary race. But so far, most voters aren't buying what they are selling.

The White House has said that President Trump was acting within his legal authority when he froze military aid to Ukraine. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump Broke The Law In Freezing Ukraine Funds, Watchdog Report Concludes

The Government Accountability Office opined on Thursday that the Trump administration's actions in the Ukraine affair went beyond the bounds of a law called the Impoundment Control Act.

Trump Broke The Law In Freezing Ukraine Funds, Watchdog Report Concludes

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A view of Jeffrey Epstein's stone mansion on Little St. James Island. Prosecutors in the Virgin Islands on Tuesday filed a civil lawsuit that accuses Epstein of human trafficking that victimized young women and children as young as 11 years old. Some of the alleged activity happened as recent as 2018. Gabriel Lopez Albarran/AP hide caption

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Gabriel Lopez Albarran/AP

U.S. Virgin Islands Officials: Epstein Trafficked Girls On Private Island Until 2018

The Virgin Islands Attorney General's Office says Epstein recruited and abused young women and girls over two decades on his two private islands. Some victims allegedly were as young as 11 years old.

Georgia Rep. John Lewis near the statue of Martin Luther King Jr. in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, D.C., earlier this year. At StoryCorps in 2018, Lewis talked about meeting King in Montgomery, Ala., at 18. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Image hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Image

Rep. John Lewis' Fight For Civil Rights Began With A Letter To Martin Luther King Jr.

As a teenager growing up in Alabama, Lewis wrote a letter to Martin Luther King Jr. during a budding civil rights movement. In a letter back, King invited the 18-year-old to join the cause.

Rep. John Lewis' Fight For Civil Rights Began With A Letter To Martin Luther King Jr.

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Nick Selby and NYPD officer Luis Sayan interview a retired New York City teacher who lost more than $300,000 to online scammers posing as Chinese police. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Coaxing Cops To Tackle Cybercrime? There's An App For That

Local police often don't feel equipped to investigate cybercrime. The NYPD is trying to teach patrol officers to ask the right questions about IP addresses, bitcoin and phone spoofing.

Coaxing Cops To Tackle Cybercrime? There's An App For That

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Certain goods, such as food products, are not affected by secondary sanctions on Iran. Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP via Getty Images

Why Iran's Economy Has Not Collapsed Amid U.S. Sanctions And 'Maximum Pressure'

Although the country has been hit hard, Iranians have managed to live under sanctions for four decades.

Why Iran's Economy Has Not Collapsed Amid U.S. Sanctions And 'Maximum Pressure'

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Fire swept through Australia's Wollemi National Park, but firefighters were able to save rare groves of prehistoric Wollemi pines. New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service via Reuters hide caption

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New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service via Reuters

Firefighters In Australia Save World's Only Groves Of Prehistoric Wollemi Pines

Fire swept through the canyons where the rare trees had outlived the dinosaurs. For days, the smoke was so thick that no one knew whether the careful plan to protect them had worked.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk speaks during the unveiling of the Tesla Model Y in Hawthorne, Calif., on March 14, 2019. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Electric Burn: Those Who Bet Against Elon Musk And Tesla Are Paying A Big Price

For years, Elon Musk skeptics have shorted Tesla stock, confident the electric carmaker was on the brink of disaster. Instead, share value has skyrocketed, costing short sellers billions.

Electric Burn: Those Who Bet Against Elon Musk And Tesla Are Paying A Big Price

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Former Canadian military reservist Patrik Jordan Mathews and two Americans face charges related to possessing an illegal assault rifle, as part of an extremist group called The Base. Mathews is seen here in an undated picture from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Winnipeg, Manitoba, last August. RCMP Manitoba/via Reuters hide caption

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RCMP Manitoba/via Reuters

FBI Arrests 3 Alleged Members Of White Supremacist Group Ahead Of Richmond Rally

The three suspected members of The Base had discussed going to Monday's pro-gun rally in Virginia, a law enforcement official tells NPR. The FBI says they also made an assault rifle.

Microsoft's Finnish headquarters in Espoo are shown in 2016. The company has announced new, more ambitious climate change targets for the coming decades. Vesa Moilanen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Vesa Moilanen/AFP via Getty Images

Microsoft Pledges To Remove From The Atmosphere All The Carbon It Has Ever Emitted

The tech giant, which says it has been "carbon neutral" for years, is now vowing to go "carbon negative" — by cutting emissions, planting trees and investing in new carbon removal technology.

Sepsis arises when the body overreacts to an infection, and blood vessels throughout the body become leaky. Researchers now estimate that about 11 million people worldwide died with sepsis in 2017 alone — that's about 20% of all deaths. Medic Image/Universal Images Gr/Getty Images hide caption

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Medic Image/Universal Images Gr/Getty Images

Stealth Disease Likely To Blame For 20% Of Worldwide Deaths

Sepsis, or blood poisoning, arises when the body overreacts to an infection. An analysis finds that it may be involved in 20% of deaths worldwide, twice the proportion previously estimated.

Scientists put several litters of wolf puppies through a standard battery of tests. Many pups, such as this one named Flea, wouldn't fetch a ball. But then something surprising happened. Christina Hansen Wheat hide caption

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Christina Hansen Wheat

Fetching With Wolves: What It Means That A Wolf Puppy Will Retrieve A Ball

Some wolf puppies will unexpectedly play "fetch," researchers say, showing that an urge to retrieve a ball might be an ancient wolf trait, and not a result of dog domestication.

Boeing 737 Max aircraft operated by Southwest Airlines crowd the tarmac of the airport in Victorville, Calif., after the Federal Aviation Administration grounded the planes last year. On Thursday, the FAA released its report on the craft's controversial certification process. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

Report Defends 'Thorough Work' In Certifying Boeing 737 Max — But Suggests Changes

Amid difficult questions about the steps taken by Boeing and regulators, the review commissioned by the Department of Transportation largely validated the process that put the jetliner in the air.

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