NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

TDC carousel

New and exclusive videos from the popular concert series.

U.S. military vehicles drive on a road in the town of Tal Tamr on Sunday after pulling out of a base in northern Syria. Defense Secretary Mark Esper says some troops may remain in northeast Syria to secure oil fields. Delil Souleiman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Delil Souleiman/AFP via Getty Images

Some U.S. Troops May Remain In Northeast Syria To Protect Oil Fields

Other U.S. troops will pivot to fighting ISIS in Iraq, rather than immediately heading home. Some 300,000 people have reportedly been displaced since Turkey's offensive began.

Scientists are exploring a new technique, called prime editing, that is more precise than CRISPR and which uses certain enzymes, including reverse transcriptase, to edit DNA. Evan Oto/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Oto/Science Source

Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes

A new technique, dubbed 'prime editing,' appears to make it even easier to make very precise changes in DNA. It's designed to overcome the limits of the CRISPR gene editing tool.

Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes

Audio will be available later today.

Hilary Swank (left) and Chloe Sevigny starred in Boys Don't Cry, a fictionalized portrayal of the transgender youth Brandon Teena (played by Swank). Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

20 Years Later, 'Boys Don't Cry' Still Inspires Admiration And Debate

The independent film became a critical and box office hit by introducing mainstream audiences to a transgender hero. It fictionalized the true story of the murder of Brandon Teena.

20 Years Later, 'Boys Don't Cry' Still Inspires Admiration And Debate

Audio will be available later today.

An e-bike resembles a regular bicycle, with its batteries and electric motor integrated into the bike's frame. Enthusiasts see e-bikes on national park trails as a great thing, but some traditional riders and environmentalists see big problems ahead. Mark Arehart/WKSU hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Arehart/WKSU

National Parks Tries To Get A Handle On E-Bikes

WKSU

Electric assisted bicycles are on trails in the national parks. Enthusiasts think that's a great thing, but some traditional riders and environmentalists see big problems ahead.

National Parks Trying To Get A Handle On E-Bikes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771858867/772050037" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The overprescription of opioid pain medications such as these oxycodone pills has been blamed for an addiction epidemic in the U.S. — and has spurred a flurry of activity in American courts. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Your Guide To The Massive (And Massively Complex) Opioid Litigation

The largest-ever federal action concerning the U.S. opioid crisis has only gotten more complicated amid a slew of recent settlements. So here's a brief(ish) explainer breaking it down.

A PET scan shows metabolism of sugar in the human brain. Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Science Source

Keeping Your Blood Sugar In Check Could Lower Your Alzheimer's Risk

Diabetes can double a person's chances of developing Alzheimer's. Now researchers are beginning to understand the role of brain metabolism in the development of the disease.

Keeping Your Blood Sugar In Check Could Lower Your Alzheimer's Risk

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771894448/771916466" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Though complications from the flu can be deadly for people who are especially vulnerable, including pregnant women and their newborns, typically only about half of pregnant women get the needed vaccination, U.S. statistics show. BSIP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
BSIP/Getty Images

Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant

Pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes and heart disease are particularly vulnerable to flu complications yet lag the elderly in getting vaccinated.

Get Your Flu Shot Now, Doctors Advise, Especially If You're Pregnant

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771339253/771820331" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks to a room of supporters at a campaign rally in Vaughan, Canada, on Friday. Cole Burston/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cole Burston/Getty Images

Justin Trudeau Battles For His Political Survival As Canadians Go To The Polls

Stung by a series of recent scandals, the prime minister is locked in a virtual tie with Andrew Scheer of the opposition Conservative Party ahead of Monday's election.

Justin Trudeau Battles For His Political Survival As Canada Gets Ready To Vote

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771424706/771759967" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Firefighter Pinyo Pukpinyo holds a Burmese python. In 16 years of snake wrangling, he says he has been bitten more than 20 times but helping people desperate to get rid of snakes in their homes "makes me happy." Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Sullivan for NPR

When Snakes Slither Into Bangkok Homes, This Is The Wrangler Who Gets Rid Of Them

When pythons, cobras and pit vipers show up, Pinyo Pukpinyo, a sergeant in Bangkok's fire department, is the expert who catches them. He's been bitten 20 times but says his work "makes me happy."

A scene from Ellen Reid's opera p r i s m, which won the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for music. Noah Stern Weber hide caption

toggle caption
Noah Stern Weber

The 2010s: Classical Music's Decade Of Reckoning

Is classical music dying? No. But its institutions, artists and promoters took some hits in the past decade, from bankruptcies to sexual harassment. Still, along the way, we heard a lot of terrific music.

The 2010s: Classical Music's Decade Of Reckoning

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/767903777/771319454" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
more from