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Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon, D-Pa., at a news conference in Philadelphia in 2019. Now that lawmakers have left for an extended recess amid the coronavirus pandemic, Scanlon hosted a kid's town hall over the phone. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Trapped By The Coronavirus Pandemic, Congress Tries New Ways Of Legislating From Home

Congress left for an extended recess as a result of the coronavirus outbreak and may not return for several weeks. Lawmakers say their days have turned into a blur of conference calls and video chats.

President Trump arrives as Dr. Anthony Fauci looks on during a Coronavirus Task Force press briefing at the White House on April 4, 2020. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Warns 'One Of The Toughest Weeks' Is Ahead, Says To Brace For 'A Lot Of Death'

The president offered a dire outlook on Saturday for the week to come, yet also said "some hard decisions are going to have to be made" regarding social distancing guidelines.

The Saint Ann Catholic Church in Washington, D.C., on Sunday night set up a livestream of a Eucharistic Adoration service on Sunday, March 29. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Hindered By A Pandemic, Religious Leaders Prepare For Holidays

Leaders across faiths in the country are working to bring a sense of community to their congregations, as religious spaces shut down during a worsening coronavirus outbreak.

Hindered By A Pandemic, Religious Leaders Prepare For Holidays

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More than 64 million Americans live in multigenerational households. Despite the emotional and financial benefits of living together, families like the Walkers, at home in Florissant, Mo., face a particular set of challenges as COVID-19 continues to spread. Michael B. Thomas for KHN hide caption

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Michael B. Thomas for KHN

How Multigenerational Families Manage 'Social Distancing' Under One Roof

Kaiser Health News

There can be emotional and financial strength in a close, multigenerational family, those who live with kids and grandparents say. Now they're finding ways to keep members safe and sane in a pandemic.

People walk and jog through Prospect Park in Brooklyn last week. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that the restrictions on daily life in New York have slowed the increase in hospitalizations. Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriela Bhaskar/Bloomberg via Getty Images

'We'll Get Through This': Living In New York City During The Coronavirus Pandemic

Politicians give speeches and scary headlines fill the news, but somehow life pushes on for New Yorkers.

Kandace Springs' latest album consists of covers of the women in jazz she idolized growing up. "It's a tribute record to give back to what they've inspired me to do as an artist," she says. Robby Klein/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Robby Klein/Courtesy of the artist

Kandace Springs Pays Tribute To 'The Women Who Raised' Her

Kandace Springs' latest album consists of covers of the women in jazz she idolized growing up. "It's a tribute record to give back to what they've inspired me to do as an artist," she says.

Kandace Springs Pays Tribute To 'The Women Who Raised' Her

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Kobe Bryant, seen during a game in 2015, was selected for the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame on Saturday, after he died in a helicopter crash with his daughter Gianna earlier this year. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Kobe Bryant Elected To Hall Of Fame In Posthumous 'Peak Of His Career'

The Los Angeles Laker legend, who died shockingly more than two months ago, headlined a star-studded 2020 Basketball Hall of Fame class on Saturday that also includes Tim Duncan and Kevin Garnett.

Thundercat's new album It Is What It Is is full of references to his late friend Mac Miller. The1point8 / Carlos G./Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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The1point8 / Carlos G./Courtesy of the artist

Thundercat On 'It Is What It Is,' Losing Mac Miller And Learning To Do Nothing

The collaboration-loving bassist said "It's hard to see clearly through the pain of losing him," when asked about the death of close friend Mac Miller. That loss permeates his fourth studio album.

Thundercat On 'It Is What It Is,' Losing Mac Miller And Learning To Do Nothing

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Vizient, a group purchasing organization that negotiates lower prices with drug manufacturers, sent recommendations to the Food and Drug Administration, urging the agency to expand access to drugs heavily used with ventilator patients. jamesbenet/Getty Images hide caption

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jamesbenet/Getty Images

U.S. May Get More Ventilators But Run Out Of Medicine For COVID-19 Patients

There have been dramatic spikes in demand for sedatives, pain medications, paralytics and other drugs that are crucial for patients who are on ventilators.

Security with face masks stand in front of the Signal Iduna Park, where a temporary coronavirus treatment center opened in Dortmund, Germany, Saturday. Germany has the fourth-most COVID-19 cases in the world and demand for medical supplies has skyrocketed. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

German, French Officials Accuse U.S. Of Diverting Supplies

Officials in France and Germany have accused the U.S. of intercepting medical supplies as President Trump ordered an American company to stop exports. Governors complain of a "wild west" in bidding.

Adrian Lerma, and her husband Michael, stand outside the grocery store in Window Rock, Ariz. They're buying food for elders in their community. Courtesy of Adrian Lerma hide caption

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Courtesy of Adrian Lerma

As Coronavirus Cases Rise, Navajo Nation Tries To Get Ahead Of Pandemic

KJZZ

The Navajo Nation has seen a significant spike in coronavirus cases. Tribal leaders say they desperately need more supplies, but the biggest problem may be the reservation's lack of running water.

As Coronavirus Cases Rise, Navajo Nation Tries To Get Ahead Of Pandemic

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Janitors clean in a hallway in Wheeler Hall on the University of California campus in Berkeley, Calif., Wednesday, March 11, 2020. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu) Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Seen And Remembered: Our Essential Workers

NPR's Scott Simon remembers those beyond the front lines of hospital rooms, but those who are cleaning up after us, making sure we're fed and kept safe in the midst of a global pandemic.

Opinion: Seen And Remembered: Our Essential Workers

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