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The resurgence of family meals is one of the "precious few good things" that's come from the COVID-19 pandemic, says food writer Sam Sifton. supersizer/Getty Images hide caption

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Cooking During COVID-19: Family Meals And Fantasies Of Future Dinner Parties

Fresh Air

Food writer Sam Sifton says the resurgence of family meals is one of the "precious few good things" to come of the pandemic. He says his family is eating a lot of tinned fish and cabbage these days.

A couple checks in to cast their ballots at the Kenosha Bible Church gym in Kenosha, Wis., on Tuesday. Voting went forward in the state, despite the ongoing pandemic. Kamil Kraczynski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kamil Kraczynski/AFP via Getty Images

Long Lines, Masks And Plexiglas Barriers Greet Wisconsin Voters At Polls

After an 11th-hour scramble, Wisconsin forged ahead with its election, despite fears about the coronavirus outbreak and an ongoing stay-at-home order.

A solidarity basket with a note reading "Those who can, put something in, those who can't, help yourself" is hung in the historic center of Naples. Salvatore Laporta/KONTROLAB/LightRocket via Getty hide caption

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Salvatore Laporta/KONTROLAB/LightRocket via Getty

In Naples, Pandemic 'Solidarity Baskets' Help Feed The Homeless

Drawing on a centuries-old tradition, a Naples couple has begun lowering baskets from their balcony. People are encouraged to take food they need, and others are encouraged to add food to the baskets.

In Naples, Pandemic 'Solidarity Baskets' Help Feed The Homeless

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The federal prison in Oakdale, La., pictured in 2006, is grappling with a series of COVID-19 cases. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

'They're All Really Afraid': Coronavirus Spreads In Federal Prisons

One of the hardest-hit facilities is in Oakdale, La. "They feel like they're sitting ducks," says Arjeane Thompson, whose boyfriend is an inmate. And staff are working overtime under the strain.

'They're All Really Afraid': Coronavirus Spreads In Federal Prisons

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Former vice president and Democratic presidential hopeful Joe Biden, seen arriving to give a speech about the coronavirus response on March 12, spoke with President Trump about the crisis on Monday. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Trump And Biden Have 'Very Friendly' Call On Virus Response

A White House adviser suggested Joe Biden call the president instead of criticizing him in public, and both sides characterized Monday's call positively.

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson, shown here in a handout photo from earlier this month, has reportedly been moved to intensive care at a London hospital. Pippa Fowles/10 Downing Street/AP hide caption

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Pippa Fowles/10 Downing Street/AP

U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson In Intensive Care Unit Because Of COVID-19

Johnson, 55, was admitted to the hospital on Sunday after testing positive for COVID-19 on March 26. But Downing Street officials said on Monday that the U.K. leader's condition has worsened.

An empty corridor at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York last month. Social distancing to slow the spread of the coronavirus leaves little demand for flights. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

Airline Flights Into And Out Of New York City Cut Drastically Because Of Coronavirus

A spokesperson said American Airline's busiest flight out of LaGuardia Sunday only had 27 passengers and nine flights from JFK and LaGuardia had one passenger on each.

"While none of this is good news, the ... possible flattening of the curve is better than the increases that we have seen," New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday. He is seen last month following the arrival of the U.S. Naval hospital ship Comfort to New York City. Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

With Coronavirus Deaths 'Essentially Flat' Last Two Days, N.Y. Gov. Sees 'Good Signs'

Gov. Andrew Cuomo said there were 599 coronavirus deaths statewide since Sunday. He said it may suggest a "possible flattening of the curve" but also warned numbers were inconclusive.

Nadia, a Malayan tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York, has tested positive for the new coronavirus. It's believed to be the first known infection in an animal in the U.S. Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society/AP hide caption

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Julie Larsen Maher/Wildlife Conservation Society/AP

A Tiger Has Coronavirus. Should You Worry About Your Pets?

Four tigers and three lions at the Bronx Zoo all had one of the symptoms of a respiratory infection: a dry cough. What does this finding mean for cats and dogs?

With so many schools closed, the Zoom video meeting app has become wildly popular among educators, but it's now under scrutiny for security and privacy issues. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Schools Ditch Zoom Amid Concerns Over Online Learning Security

School leaders in New York City, Las Vegas and Washington, D.C., are abandoning the videoconferencing service after reports of meetings being disrupted by intruders.

The pandemic is keeping cars parked, which means fewer crashes — and big savings for auto insurers. Allstate and American Family Insurance have decided to return that extra cash to customers. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Some Auto Insurers Are Sending Refunds To Customers As Crash Rate Falls

The pandemic is keeping cars parked, which means fewer crashes — and big savings for auto insurers. Allstate and American Family Insurance have decided to return that extra cash to customers.

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