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Dr. Kass recently sent all three of her children away, to live with her parents in New Jersey while she treats coronavirus patients. Erin Gitlin hide caption

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Erin Gitlin

Coronavirus Pandemic Takes A Toll On ER Doctors' Health And Families

Some doctors are sending their children to live elsewhere and rearranging their personal lives as they fight the outbreak in the U.S.

Coronavirus Pandemic Takes A Toll On ER Doctors' Health And Families

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Even some of the darkest, wettest parts of the Australian landscape burned during the country's fire season. The incursion of fire into these damp refuges alarms ecologists like Mark Graham. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Fires Where They Are 'Not Supposed To Happen' In Australia's Ancient Rainforest

Australia's unprecedented fire season scorched sections of rare, ancient rainforests. It's another signal that climate change is intensifying and expanding wildfires globally.

China's national liquor offered bottles of their premium product as a reward to health-care workers who traveled to Wuhan to help fight coronavirus. But there was a catch. Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

A Reward Of Liquor For Coronavirus Heroes In China Does Not Bring Cheers

A token of appreciation for medical staff who worked in Wuhan when coronavirus was at its peak is getting an icy reception on social media.

Members of the Arizona National Guard distribute food on March 27 in Mesa, Ariz. The Guard has been activated to bolster the supply chain and distribution of food amid surging demand in response to the COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak. Matt York/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP

Closures, Benefits And Takeout: Here's How Each State Is Battling Coronavirus

State leaders are taking a variety of approaches to fighting the global pandemic — from stay-at-home orders to county-by-county directives. Check out how your state is trying to keep residents safe.

Andrea Schry (right) fills out the buyer's part of legal forms to buy a handgun as shop worker Missy Morosky fills out the vendor's parts after Dukes Sport Shop in New Castle, Pa., reopened on Wednesday. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

Officials Debate Whether Gun Stores Are 'Essential' During Coronavirus Outbreak

Governors and mayors in some parts of the country are requiring them to close like many other businesses. Other officials are letting gun sales continue. Gun rights groups are on the defensive.

Gateway to the Americas Bridge connecting Laredo, Texas and Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico, has been nearly empty. On a normal day, about 10,000 people cross from Nuevo Laredo into Laredo. This week, it's barely a trickle. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Life On The U.S.-Mexico Frontier Dramatically Altered By Partial Border Shutdown

The coronavirus outbreak led President Trump to close U.S. borders with Canada and Mexico last week. At the southern border, the closure is affecting life on both the U.S. and Mexico sides.

Life On The U.S.-Mexico Frontier Dramatically Altered By Partial Border Shutdown

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In New York City, 42nd Street stands mostly empty as much of the city is void of cars and pedestrians over fears of spreading the coronavirus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Opinion: Remembering Some Of Those We've Already Lost To The Pandemic

We often think of fatality rates as statistics — numbers on a chart. But each one represents a real person. NPR's Scott Simon reflects on some of those who have been lost so far in the pandemic.

Opinion: Remembering Some Of Those We've Already Lost To The Pandemic

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People in Wuhan, China, line up at a facility that tests discharged COVID-19 patients as well as individuals who'd been held in isolation. Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mystery In Wuhan: Recovered Coronavirus Patients Test Negative ... Then Positive

NPR interviewed four residents of Wuhan who contracted the virus, recovered — but then had a re-test that turned positive. What does that mean for China's recovery from COVID-19?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there's no evidence that pets can contract or spread the coronavirus. But you still may want to keep your dog away from other people right now. Max Posner/NPR hide caption

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Max Posner/NPR

Coronavirus FAQs: Does It Live On Clothes? Can My Dog Infect Me? Any Advice On Wipes?

Among the questions this week: Can you get COVID-19 more than once? What's the maximum surface area that can be treated with one disinfecting wipe?

President Trump signs the CARES Act, a $2 trillion rescue package to provide economic relief amid the coronavirus outbreak, at the Oval Office on Friday. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Trump: Governors Should Be 'Appreciative' Of Federal Coronavirus Efforts

In Friday evening's briefing, Trump said he believes the federal government has been working well with most states in the disaster, but he griped about reported complaints by some Democratic governors.

The closest fans can get to Major League Baseball during the coronavirus hiatus — a statue outside Great American Ball Park yesterday in Cincinnati. USA Today Sports via Reuters hide caption

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USA Today Sports via Reuters

Players And MLB Agree To Terms In Case Coronavirus Cancels Entire Baseball Season

On Friday, players and the Major League Baseball owners ratified a deal fairly quickly and with both sides taking concessions on economic issues in the face of the pandemic complicating the season.

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

With Schools Closed, Kids With Disabilities Are More Vulnerable Than Ever

About 14% of U.S. public school students receive special education services. And as schools transition from the classroom to the computer, many of those students could get left behind.

With Schools Closed, Kids With Disabilities Are More Vulnerable Than Ever

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Traffic is light on East First Street after the new restrictions went into effect at midnight as the coronavirus pandemic spreads on March 20, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. California Governor Gavin Newsom issued a statewide stay at home order for Californias 40 million residents except for necessary activities in order to slow the spread of COVID-19. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Experts Say The U.S. Needs A National Shutdown ASAP — But Differ On What Comes Next

Leading public health experts argue that all U.S. states should have residents stay at home for several weeks to slow the coronavirus. But what needs to happen after the lockdowns are lifted?

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