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Senate Democrats speak Oct. 12 after the confirmation hearing for Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett before the Judiciary Committee. They announced Wednesday they will boycott the committee vote on confirming Barrett. Stefani Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/AP

Democrats Plan To Boycott Senate Committee Vote On Barrett Nomination

Democrats see Mitch McConnell's rush to confirm Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett as unprecedented and "outrageous," but they have little power to stop it in a GOP-controlled Senate.

Former President Barack Obama addresses Biden-Harris supporters during a drive-in rally in Philadelphia on Wednesday. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Entreating Pa. Residents To Vote, Obama Delivers Rebuke Of Trump

"What we do these next 13 days will matter for decades to come," the former president said. Barack Obama also used his speech as an opportunity to reflect on his personal relationship with his former vice president.

Eli Lilly researchers prepare cells to produce possible COVID-19 antibodies in a laboratory in Indianapolis. The drugmaker has asked the U.S. government to allow emergency use of its experimental antibody therapy. David Morrison/AP hide caption

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David Morrison/AP

How Will The Limited Supply Of Antibody Drugs For COVID-19 Be Allocated?

Experimental medicines have the potential to help people with COVID-19 avoid hospitalization. The scarce supply of the treatments would have to be rationed, if regulators OK their use.

How Will The Limited Supply Of Antibody Drugs For COVID-19 Be Allocated?

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A sign reminded visitors to wear masks at Belmont University, which was supposed to host the second presidential debate last week in Nashville. Federal health officials say a new study highlights the need for masks. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

CDC Reduces Consecutive Minutes Of COVID-19 Exposure Needed To Be A 'Close Contact'

Health officials used to advise going into quarantine and being tested for the coronavirus if you are near an infected person for 15 minutes. Now the rule is a total of 15 minutes during one day.

Protesters chant and sing solidarity songs as they barricade barricade the Lagos-Ibadan expressway on Wednesday to protest against police brutality and the killing of protesters by the military, at Magboro, Ogun State, Nigeria. Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images

'Hope Is Lost' As Police Open Fire On Pro-Reform Protesters In Lagos, Nigeria

The protests began about two weeks ago demanding an end to police brutality. Now, as one activist said, "it has become so many things for so many Nigerians." The government declared a 24-hour curfew.

In his book How To, Randall Munroe explores whether you could open enough water bottles to fill a swimming pool — using nuclear weapons. Riverhead Books hide caption

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Riverhead Books

Randall Munroe's Absurd Scientific Advice For Real-World Problems

Randall Munroe, the cartoonist behind the popular Internet comic xkcd, finds complicated solutions to simple, real-world problems. In the process, he reveals a lot about science and why the real world is sometimes even weirder than we expect.

Randall Munroe's Absurd Scientific Advice For Real-World Problems

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Purdue Pharma headquarters stands in downtown Stamford, April 2, 2019 in Stamford, Conn. Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, and its owners, the Sackler family, have faced hundreds of lawsuits for the company's alleged role in the opioid epidemic that has killed more than 200,000 Americans over the past 20 years. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Purdue Pharma Reaches $8B Opioid Deal With Justice Department Over OxyContin Sales

Critics say the settlement doesn't hold company executives or members of the Sackler family accountable for their aggressive marketing of OxyContin, which helped fuel the nation's opioid epidemic.

Five U.S.-made F-16 jets fly over the Presidential Office during Taiwan's National Day in Taipei on Oct. 10. Sam Yeh/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Yeh/AFP via Getty Images

Taiwan's U.S. Friendship Comes With Benefits — And China's Wrath

President Trump's administration has deepened ties with Taiwan, as tensions with China intensify. That could be why more Taiwanese favor him to win the U.S. election, according to a poll.

Taiwan's U.S. Friendship Comes With Benefits — And China's Wrath

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The Justice Department alleges Google has an illegal monopoly in search, setting up the biggest confrontation with a tech giant in more than 20 years. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Don Ryan/AP

Google Lawsuit Marks End Of Washington's Love Affair With Big Tech

The Justice Department's lawsuit against Google is the clearest sign yet of the "Techlash" that has politicians on both sides of the aisle bristling at the power of Silicon Valley.

Google Lawsuit Marks End Of Washington's Love Affair With Big Tech

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Editor's Pick

Steve Wynn speaks to reporters in Massachusetts in 2016, when he still led Wynn Resorts. In 2018, Wynn stepped down from the company after a series of allegations of sexual misconduct, including one allegation of rape. Wynn has denied any wrongdoing. Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

GOP Welcomes Steve Wynn's Millions, Despite Rape And Harassment Allegations

Former casino mogul Steve Wynn has been accused of rape, sexual assault, and harassment. Still, politicians have continued to accept major campaign contributions from Wynn, who has denied wrongdoing.

Friederike Seyfried, director of Antique Egyptian Department of the Neues Museum in Berlin, shows media a stain from liquid on the Sarcophagus of the prophet Ahmose on Wednesday. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Dozens Of Artifacts Apparently Vandalized At Berlin's Museums

Police, who believe vandalism to be the cause, are unsure of the motive. German media is speculating a link to a conspiracy theory. The extent of the damage won't be clear until after restoration.

Supporters of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden sit on top of their vehicles as they listen to him speak at Riverside High School in Durham, N.C., on Sunday afternoon. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Anxious Democrats Don't Trust Biden's Lead. His Campaign Is Fine With That

After 2016, nothing will make Democrats feel secure in the final weeks of a presidential election. For Joe Biden's campaign, which doesn't want voters to be complacent, the anxiety is OK.

Anxious Democrats Don't Trust Biden's Lead. His Campaign Is Fine With That

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President Trump on Wednesday commuted the sentences of five individuals, four of whom had been sentenced on drug charges and a fifth who was serving time for food stamp fraud. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Trump Grants Clemency To 5, Most Incarcerated For Drug Offenses

The White House described all of the individuals as having been model inmates during their incarcerations who had worked to better themselves and the people around them while still behind bars.

Editor's Pick

A California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection airplane drops fire retardant along a burning hill during the Glass Fire in Calistoga, Calif., in September. California is one of two states to require wildfire risk be disclosed to new homebuyers. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Of Homes Are At Risk Of Wildfires, But It's Rarely Disclosed

Many homeowners who lost everything in a wildfire had no idea they were at risk. Only two states require disclosing wildfire risk to buyers in the house hunting process.

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