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Members of CASA, an advocacy organization for Latino and immigrant people, hold up white roses in honor of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court on Wednesday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

What The SCOTUS Vacancy Means For Abortion — And The Election

Several cases on abortion restrictions could land at the Supreme Court soon. And following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Democrats are making political donations in record numbers.

What The SCOTUS Vacancy Means for Abortion — And The 2020 Election

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The American flag hangs in front of the New York Stock Exchange on September 21, 2020, in New York City. Citigroup estimates the U.S. economy lost $16 trillion over the past 20 years as a result of discrimination against African Americans. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Cost Of Racism: U.S. Economy Lost $16 Trillion Because Of Discrimination, Bank Says

Citigroup estimates the economy would see a $5 trillion boost over the next five years if the U.S. were to tackle key areas of discrimination against African Americans.

Archbishop Franzo King who, with his wife Marina, co-founded the St. John Will-I-Am Coltrane African Orthodox Church, in a portrait shot in Jan. 2020. Colin Marshall/NPR hide caption

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Colin Marshall/NPR

Five Decades On, An Eclectic Church Preaches The Message Of John Coltrane

In 1965, two young fans heard the jazz giant play at a San Francisco club and had a religious epiphany. Their church is an idiosyncratic and joyful blend of devotion to the divine — and to jazz.

Five Decades On, An Eclectic Church Preaches The Message Of John Coltrane

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A satellite image shows smoke and some of the major fires in Western states on Sept. 13. Sean McMinn/NPR, Source: RAMMB/Colorado State University hide caption

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Sean McMinn/NPR, Source: RAMMB/Colorado State University

1 In 7 Americans Have Experienced Dangerous Air Quality Due To Wildfires This Year

Parts of the West Coast experienced very unhealthy or hazardous air from wildfires for the first time ever recorded. Millions endured that smoke for twice as long as the recent average.

Members of a rescue crew work to free a whale from a sandbar off the coast of Tasmania, Australia, on Tuesday. About 380 pilot whales have died in the mass stranding, one of the largest ever recorded. Brodie Weeding/AP hide caption

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Brodie Weeding/AP

At Least 380 Whales Dead In Australia's Largest-Ever Mass Stranding

"While they are still alive and in water, there is certainly hope for them, but as time goes on, they become more fatigued and their chance of survival reduces," said a government wildlife official.

An aerial view of the Tesla Fremont Factory in Fremont, Calif., in May. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order on Wednesday that bans the sale of new gasoline-powered vehicles in the state by 2035. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

California Governor Signs Order Banning Sales Of New Gasoline Cars By 2035

Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order Wednesday that amounts to the most aggressive clean-car policy in the U.S. and would end the sale of new gas vehicles in the state in 15 years.

The pandemic's financial pressures cause many Americans to struggle with rent. Demonstrators march in the Old Town neighborhood of Chicago this June to demand a lift on the Illinois rent control ban and a cancellation of rent and mortgage payments. Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Max Herman/NurPhoto via Getty Images

'No One Can Live Off $240 A Week': Many Americans Struggle To Pay Rent, Bills

One in six households reported missing or delaying paying bills just so they could buy food, an NPR poll says. And many are having trouble paying the rent, especially African Americans and Latinos.

The UC Berkeley campus sits empty on July 22.The University of California admitted at least 64 students over more qualified applicants due to the students' connections to university staff or donors, according to a California state audit released Tuesday. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Audit: University Of California Admitted 64 Students Over More Qualified Applicants

The students admitted were well-connected to staff or donors and took spots from more qualified applicants.

A collage of the books featured in the episode: Catherine House; Take a Hint, Dani Brown; Real Men Knit; and Mexican Gothic. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

Battle Of The Books: What To Read In These Coronavirus Times

What kind of books are best to read during this pandemic? Books that connect you to our current reality? Or ones that help you escape it?

Battle Of The Books

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Dao Thi Hoa, right, chairwoman of the Intergenerational Self Help Club in the Khuong Din ward of Hanoi in Vietnam, checks the club's account book with other members. Nguyễn Văn Hốt hide caption

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Nguyễn Văn Hốt

Older People, Got A Pandemic Problem? A Club To Help You Figure It Out — Yourself

Vietnam's Intergenerational Self Help Clubs encourage older people in the neighborhood to find solutions to their own challenges, whether it's feeling lonely or needing a little extra cash.

Dua Lipa released her second album, the glossy, pristine Future Nostalgia, in March, just weeks after COVID-19 locked the world into quarantine. The sure-footedness of her dance floor-inspired pop gained ironic resonance in the uncertainty of the moment that followed. Hugo Comte/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Hugo Comte/Courtesy of the artist

How Dua Lipa's Day-Glo Nostalgia Found A Home In Dark Times

A pair of euphoric projects have helped to make the singer a ray of light for pop fans longing for the dance floor in a year filled with calamity.

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