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Stacey Mei Yan Fong has been baking her way across the United States: Clockwise from upper left, a baked Alaska pie, Utah's funeral potato pie, Nevada's all you can eat buffet pie, South Carolina's peach pie, Ohio's buckeye pie, Iowa's s'mores pie, Missouri's frozen custard pie, and Minnesota's corn dog casserole pie. Stacey Mei Yan Fong hide caption

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Stacey Mei Yan Fong

An Ode, À La Mode: 1 Baker Savors America, Creating 50 Pies For 50 States

Originally from Singapore, Stacey Mei Yan Fong loves baking and America. For a project she calls 50 Pies/50 States, she's made an elaborative representative pie for each state.

An Ode, À La Mode: 1 Baker Savors America, Creating 50 Pies For 50 States

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This video grab taken on Thursday from an AFP video shows CCTV camera footage, widely distributed on social networks, shows producer Michel Zecler being beaten up by police officers at the entrance of a music studio in the 17th arrondissement of Paris on Nov. 21. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

French Police Officers In Custody After Video Emerges Of Brutal Beating Of Black Man

The officers were unaware they were being filmed by a surveillance camera in Paris as they beat the man. The incident comes as the government tries to pass controversial limits on images of police.

North Korean State Commission of Quality Management staff in protective gear carries a disinfectant pray can as personnel check the health of travelers and inspect goods delivered via the borders at the Pyongyang Airport in North Korea, on Feb. 1. Jon Chol Jin/AP hide caption

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Jon Chol Jin/AP

North Korea Executed Coronavirus Rule-Breaker, Says South Korean Intelligence

South Korean lawmakers say intelligence officials briefed them on the North's tough pandemic rules, including a Pyongyang lockdown and an execution of an official caught breaking restrictions.

The big family in The Happiest Season includes Burl Moseley, Alison Brie, Kristen Stewart, Mackenzie Davis, Mary Holland, Victor Garber and Mary Steenburgen. (Whew!) Hulu hide caption

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Hulu

'Happiest Season' Is A Holiday Family Romcom With A Very Merry Cast

Kristen Stewart and Mackenzie Davis play Abby and Harper, a couple headed home to Abby's parents' house for Christmas. Dan Levy, Victor Garber and Aubrey Plaza are among the terrific supporting cast.

A healthcare worker processes people in line at a United Memorial Medical Center COVID-19 testing site on Nov. 19, in Houston. Texas is rushing thousands of additional medical staff to overworked hospitals as the number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients increases. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Government Model Suggests U.S. COVID-19 Cases Could Be Approaching 100 Million

Government scientists estimate that the true number of coronavirus infections is eight times the reported number of 12.5 million, meaning "most of the country remains at risk," the team reports.

A former FARC guerrilla member waves a FARC political party flag during a demonstration in Bogota on Nov. 2. A federal court overturned an asylum decision Wednesday, holding that FARC death threats counted as persecution.× Daniel Munoz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Munoz/AFP via Getty Images

Death Threats — Even In Writing — Can Be Grounds For Asylum, Appeals Court Says

The court overturned a Justice Department decision denying the asylum of a former police officer who received multiple death threats from the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia.

Six executives for Citgo, the US-based subsidiary of the Venezuelan state oil company PDVSA, were convicted and sentenced Thursday to more than eight years for allegations of corruption. SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

6 U.S. Citgo Executives Convicted And Sentenced in Venezuela

First arrested in Venezuela in November 2017, they were convicted Thanksgiving Day on corruption charges and immediately sentenced to more than eight years in prison.

Princess Haley, co-founder of a group called Appetite for Change, picks an artichoke to go into supply boxes of fresh produce. The group's mission is to improve the diet of families in Minneapolis. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

A Garden Is The Frontline In The Fight Against Racial Inequality And Disease

North Minneapolis's mostly minority community lost its only grocery store this summer. It's a neighborhood grappling with heart disease, obesity and COVID-19. A garden may help.

A Garden Is The Frontline In The Fight Against Racial Inequality And Disease

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A crowd gathers for a rally to demand justice in the death of Breonna Taylor on the steps of the the Kentucky State Capitol in June. Taylor was killed in her apartment while Louisville police served a warrant. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

Movement To Limit Police Raids Looks Beyond 'No-Knock' Warrants

The death of Breonna Taylor energized a nationwide movement to restrict "no-knock" police raids, but activists want tightened rules for other kinds of forced-entry search warrants.

In his Thanksgiving address Wednesday, President-elect Joe Biden acknowledged that the imperative "to love our neighbors as ourselves," may strike many people right now as "a radical act." But Biden insisted, "We must try." Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

As President-Elect Joe Biden Doubles Down On Calls For Unity, Supporters Have Doubts

"That's a wonderful sentiment," says Abbi Gold, 59, a Democrat from Arizona. "It's probably a really sweet pipe dream." Hoping to help, many are ramping up trainings for cross-the-aisle conversations.

A young Crescenciana Tan working as cashier at a local grocery store in the Philippines in 1960. Courtesy of Kenneth Tan hide caption

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Courtesy of Kenneth Tan

'We Are Her Work': Remembering Grandma's Legacy

Kenneth and Olivia Tan recall her mother, Crescenciana. They called her Lola. She spent her life working to support and care for three generations. Says Olivia: "We are her work."

'We Are Her Work': Remembering Grandma's Legacy

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Mount Everest, the world's tallest peak, seen from Syangboche in Nepal. Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Mathema/AFP via Getty Images

How Tall Is Mount Everest? Hint: It's Changing

The science involved in measuring the world's highest peak is ridiculously complicated.

How Tall Is Mount Everest? Hint: It's Changing

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A Northern Spotted owl sits on a branch. Tom Gallagher/AP hide caption

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Tom Gallagher/AP

How A Reclusive Owl Galvanized The Fight Between Industry And Conservation

Many see the Endangered Species Act as either a tool that protects the environment or a hammer that smashes rural economies. But those beliefs miss the fact that it was a single sentence in an entirely different law that locked up the forests where the northern spotted owl lives.

The Spotted Owl

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"You do what you have to do to survive," says Diane Evans, who is fighting pandemic loneliness with technology. Evans lives in San Francisco and has Zoom calls regularly with her daughter in Chicago. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

Older People Are Less Consumed By Pandemic Depression, Research Finds

KQED

"They've been finding ways to adapt and cope," says Ashwin Kotwal, a geriatrician at the University of California, San Francisco. "They're finding creative ways to interact with family members through Zoom, taking dance classes online or joining virtual book clubs."

Medical staff prepare for an intubation procedure on a patient suffering COVID-19 in an ICU in Houston, Texas. In some parts of the country, as hospitals get crowded, hospital leaders are worried they may need to implement crisis standards of care. Go Nakamura/Getty Images hide caption

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Go Nakamura/Getty Images

As Hospitals Strain Under Influx Of COVID-19 Patients, Deaths Are Climbing

Hospitals are getting so crowded with COVID-19 patients that they're having to resort to workarounds to treat them all. Experts warn this may hamper doctors' ability to save lives.

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