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Facebook has promised repeatedly in recent years to address the spread of conspiracy theories and misinformation on its site. Ben Margot/AP hide caption

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Ben Margot/AP

Far-Right Misinformation Is Thriving On Facebook. A New Study Shows Just How Much

Research from New York University found that far-right accounts known for spreading misinformation drive engagement at higher rates than other news sources.

Far-Right Misinformation Is Thriving On Facebook. A New Study Shows Just How Much

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Former National Youth Poet Laureate Amanda Gorman arrives at the inauguration of US President-elect Joe Biden on the West Front of the US Capitol on Jan. 20 in Washington, DC. Gorman says she was tailed Friday night by a security guard who said she looked "suspicious." Win McNamee/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

'This Is The Reality Of Black Girls': Inauguration Poet Says She Was Tailed By Guard

Amanda Gorman, who became a sensation after her poem at Joe Biden's inauguration, says a security guard told her she looked "suspicious."

From a sampling of Girl Scout Cookies, LA Times food columnist Lucas Kwan Peterson says that Samoas (also known as Caramel deLites) are the superior cookie. Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Food Critic, Provocateur Definitively Ranks Girl Scout Cookies

Los Angeles Times food columnist Lucas Kwan Peterson breaks down his "official" — and very biased — rating system that led him to rate 12 kinds of Girl Scout cookies.

A work called Nyan Cat by Chris Torres sold for $590,000 recently. It's part of growing interest in digital assets, known as non-fungible tokens, or NFTs, that are generating millions of dollars in sales every day. Chris Torres hide caption

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Chris Torres

What's An NFT? And Why Are People Paying Millions To Buy Them?

The latest Internet hype is about a thing that doesn't really exist. Some collectors are spending millions of dollars on these digital items called non-fungible tokens, or NFTs.

What's An NFT? And Why Are People Paying Millions To Buy Them?

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Agnes Boisvert, an ICU nurse at St. Luke's hospital in downtown Boise, Idaho, spends every day trying to navigate between two worlds. One is a swirl of beeping monitors, masked emotion and death; the other, she says, seems oblivious to the horrors occurring every hour of every day. Isabel Seliger for NPR hide caption

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Isabel Seliger for NPR

COMIC: How One COVID-19 Nurse Navigates Anti-Mask Sentiment

At work every day, Agnes Boisvert attends to ICU patients "gasping for air" and dying from COVID-19. But communicating that harsh reality to her skeptical community has been a challenge.

Oil pump jacks operate at dusk in Long Beach, Calif., on April 21, 2020. After getting burned by the oil industry's previous boom-and-bust cycles, Wall Street now wants energy companies to pump less crude, not more. Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

Hold That Drill: Why Wall Street Wants Energy Companies To Pump Less Oil, Not More

After bankrolling oil companies for years and seeing poor returns, investors are now pressuring companies to keep their oil output lower, instead of higher.

Pokémon Legends: Arceus lets players hunt the tiny monsters in a new, open-world setting. The Pokémon Company hide caption

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The Pokémon Company

New Pokémon Game Goes Off The Beaten Path

For years, open-world video games, where players can explore the map rather than following a set path, have been hugely popular. The Pokémon franchise is finally catching up, but how will fans react?

New Pokémon Game Goes Off The Beaten Path

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Genevieve Villamora, 44, says she suffered hair loss after recovering from COVID-19: Her hands would be covered with hair after a shower. It was "traumatic because as a woman so much of my femininity and self-image is linked to my hair," says the Washington, D.C., restaurateur. Her hair loss began to lessen four months out from her recovery from COVID. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Coronavirus FAQ: Does It Make Your Hair Fall Out?

The term "hair loss" has been googled a lot during this pandemic. What's going on?

New York lawmakers approved a bill Friday to strip Gov. Andrew Cuomo of the extraordinary authority to issue COVID-19 directives — a power it granted last year. But the measure allows existing orders to be extended. Cuomo is seen here during a news conference last month. Seth Wenig/POOL /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Wenig/POOL /AFP via Getty Images

New York Legislature Strips Cuomo Of Extraordinary Emergency Powers, With A Caveat

It's the latest setback for Cuomo, who is facing a pair of political crises. But many of his critics say the legislation doesn't do enough to wrest power back from the executive branch.

The late Rep. John Lewis stands on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., in 2015, where he was beaten by police on "Bloody Sunday." Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

For The First Time In 56 Years, A 'Bloody Sunday' Without John Lewis

Sunday's anniversary of the day marchers were beaten by police in Selma, Ala., will honor the late civil rights icon. Some 56 years later, former state Sen. Hank Sanders says his work isn't done.

For The First Time In 56 Years, A 'Bloody Sunday' Without John Lewis

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Former Minnesota police officer, Derek Chauvin, Ramsey County Sheriff's Office, May 29, 2020. Chauvin faces second and third-degree murder charges as well as one count of second-degree manslaughter. Brommerich/AP hide caption

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Brommerich/AP

Former Officer Charged With Killing George Floyd May Face Additional Murder Charge

Derek Chauvin is to be tried on charges of second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter starting next week. A charge of third-degree murder had been dismissed earlier.

Boxes containing vials of the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine sit in a container before being transported to a refrigeration unit at Louisville Metro Health and Wellness headquarters on March 4 in Louisville, Ky. The FDA approved the third COVID-19 vaccine on Feb. 27. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

1 Shot Or 2 Shots? 'The Vaccine That's Available To You — Get That'

As the new Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine rolls out, the health care community is trying to ward off misconceptions about it. The vaccine's one-shot feature may be what wins many over.

1 Shot Or 2 Shots? 'The Vaccine That's Available To You — Get That'

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Disneyland, Anaheim, Calif., September 2020. California announced theme parks, sports arenas and stadiums will be allowed to open on April 1 if they meet health requirements at the county level. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

California Set To Open Ballparks, Arenas And Theme Parks In April

Attendance for sporting events, live music and theme parks will vary at the county level based on COVID-19 infection rates. Only in-state residents will be allowed to attend.

Signage requiring masks is on display outside of a H-E-B supermarket in Austin, Texas on March 3. Texas is one of the states lifting its mask mandate alongside other COVID-19 restrictions, against the warnings of public health experts. Montinique Monroe/Getty Images hide caption

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Montinique Monroe/Getty Images

As States Ease Restrictions, Study Says On-Premises Dining Linked To COVID-19 Spread

A study published Friday in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report found that cases and deaths decreased after states enacted mask mandates and increased after they reopened on-premises dining.

Four-year-old Lois Copley-Jones, the photographer's daughter, takes part in a livestreamed broadcast of "PE With Joe" on March 23, 2020, in Newcastle-under-Lyme, England. The popular fitness series ended Friday. Gareth Copley/Getty Images hide caption

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Gareth Copley/Getty Images

As Schools Reopen, Popular 'PE With Joe' Online Exercise Class Goes Bye-Bye

A year ago, as the pandemic began, fitness instructor Joe Wicks started a daily exercise class for kids on YouTube. The videos became popular with kids and their parents. Now the series is ending.

As Schools Reopen, Popular 'PE With Joe' Online Exercise Class Goes Bye-Bye

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A COVID-19 patient in Brazil awaits transfer by ambulance boat to a hospital. Tarso Sarraf/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tarso Sarraf/AFP via Getty Images

Brazil In Crisis: 'It Feels Like You Are In Stalingrad, in World War II'

Dr. Miguel Nicolelis, a Duke University neuroscientist originally from Brazil, has been in Sao Paulo for the past year caring for his mother. He says it's like a war zone.

Brazil In Crisis: 'It Feels Like You Are In Stalingrad, in World War II'

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