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Robert Stewart was one of the first Black officers hired by LAPD. He was terminated in 1900 and on Tuesday the Los Angeles Police Commission unanimously voted to have him reinstated to retire with honor. LAPD handout hide caption

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LAPD handout

One of LAPD's First Black Officers Reinstated More Than 120 Years After His Firing

Robert Stewart was among the first Black officers hired by the LAPD. He spent 11 years on the force before he was unjustly terminated, according to the Los Angeles Police Commission.

William Burns, President Biden's nominee for CIA director, testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Wednesday. Burns served more than 30 years at the State Department and would be the first career diplomat to lead the spy agency. Tom Williams/AP hide caption

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Tom Williams/AP

CIA Nominee William Burns Talks Tough On China

Burns said his top priority as spy chief would be a rising China. He received strong bipartisan support in testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee and was widely expected to be confirmed.

Soil on hilltops in this photo is lighter in color, revealing a loss of fertile topsoil. Evan Thaler for NPR hide caption

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Evan Thaler for NPR

New Evidence Shows Fertile Soil Gone From Midwestern Farms

One third of the cropland in the upper Midwest has entirely lost its fertile topsoil, according to a new study. Other scientists doubt that figure, but agree that soil loss is a big problem.

New Evidence Shows Fertile Soil Gone From Midwestern Farms

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President Joe Biden, pictured on the campaign trail in Nov. 2020, has long encouraged Americans to mask up in the fight against COVID-19. On Wednesday, his administration announced it will provide 25 million masks to community health centers and food banks across the country. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Biden Administration To Deliver 25 Million Masks To Health Centers And Food Banks

Officials said Wednesday that the masks will be delivered in the coming months, and are expected to reach an estimated 12 to 15 million vulnerable Americans.

Tim O'Brien was a foot soldier during the Vietnam War. "The problem for me really is that I questioned the rectitude of the war," he says. "I thought I was doing the wrong thing by being there." Courtesy of Gravitas Ventures hide caption

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Courtesy of Gravitas Ventures

Tim O'Brien On Late-In-Life Fatherhood And The Things He Carried From Vietnam

Fresh Air

Now 74, O'Brien didn't become a father until his late 50s. He reflects on writing, mortality and his experiences in Vietnam in the new documentary, The War and Peace of Tim O'Brien.

A health care worker looked away as she was immunized with Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine at Klerksdorp Hospital in Klerksdorp, South Africa, on Feb. 18. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

FDA Analysis of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine Finds It Safe, Effective

The Food and Drug Administration released an analysis of Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine Wednesday morning that appears to support its authorization for emergency use.

Top left: An officer asks people to observe lockdown rules in Brighton, England. Bottom left: A protester at a lockdown demonstration in Brussels, Belgium last month. Top right: Malaysian health officers screen passengers with a thermal scanner at Kuala Lumpur Airport in January 2020. Bottom right: Employees eat their lunch in Wuhan, China, in March 2020. Luke Dray/Getty Images; Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images; Mohd Rasfan / AFP; Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Dray/Getty Images; Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images; Mohd Rasfan / AFP; Getty Images

Why 'Tight' Cultures May Fare Better Than 'Loose' Cultures In A Pandemic

A new study in The Lancet Planetary Health finds that cultural attitudes may explain the stark differences in how countries experience the pandemic.

Penguin Random House

A Botched Execution Leads To A Search For Answers In 'Two Truths And A Lie'

Fresh Air

Ellen McGarrahan was a young reporter for The Miami Herald, when she witnessed an execution that went horribly wrong. She revisits the case of Jesse Tafero in an intense new true crime book.

A Botched Execution Leads To A Search For Answers In 'Two Truths And A Lie'

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Aniya's overnight shift at an Amazon warehouse became impractical when daycare and school were canceled for her two children because of the pandemic. She was able to avoid eviction with the help of a lawyer and emergency rental assistance but she recently received a letter saying that her lease would not be renewed and she had to vacate the apartment. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

For Black Families, Evictions Are Still At A Crisis Point — Despite Moratorium

"Black individuals make up about 21% of all renters, but they make up 35% of all defendants on eviction cases," says Peter Hepburn, a researcher for Princeton University's Eviction Lab.

For Black Families, Evictions Are Still At A Crisis Point — Despite Moratorium

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Amy Sherald, who painted the official portrait of Michelle Obama, appeared in the film Black Art: In the Absence of Light. HBO hide caption

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HBO

'Black Art' Chronicles A Pivotal Exhibition And Its Lasting Impact On Black Artists

A 1976 exhibit of art created by African Americans was the first major show by a Black curator and serves as a starting point for the HBO documentary Black Art: In the Absence of Light.

'Black Art' Chronicles A Pivotal Exhibition And Its Lasting Impact On Black Artists

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Rosamund Pike stars in the new Netflix film I Care A Lot. Seacia Pavao/Netflix hide caption

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Seacia Pavao/Netflix

You May Or May Not Care For 'I Care A Lot'

In the new Netflix comedy-thriller, Rosamund Pike plays a grifter who tricks her way into becoming the legal guardian of elderly people, then drains their bank accounts. It's a well-oiled scheme, until she chooses a woman with a dangerous background as her new target.

You May Or May Not Care For 'I Care A Lot'

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The magnets used in these letters are one of the more obvious uses of magnets, but magnets are also found in many other household objects. Fred Tanneau/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Tanneau/AFP via Getty Images

Magnets: The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

Magnets are hidden everywhere — in cars, phones, computers, televisions — not to mention the fact that earth is basically a giant magnet. NPR science correspondent Geoff Brumfiel explains why magnets deserve more respect.

Magnets: The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

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Children attend online classes at the Crenshaw Family YMCA in Los Angeles. Schools are having a hard time covering the costs required for in-person and online learning during the pandemic. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

Not All COVID-19 Aid Is Spent. But Schools, Cities And States Say They Need More

Republicans in Congress question whether schools, cities and states really need as much relief as President Biden and Democrats want to give them. At the local level, people say they're desperate.

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