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Avril Haines, the new director of national intelligence, released a declassified report Friday that says Saudi Arabia's crown prince was responsible for a 2018 killing of a prominent journalist. Haines spoke to NPR in her first interview since taking office last month. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Avril Haines Takes Over As Intelligence Chief At 'A Challenging Time'

As Haines sat down for an interview with NPR, her aides handed out a declassified report blaming Saudi Arabia's crown prince for a brutal killing.

Shipping workers recorded the tide levels beginning in 1854 at St. George's Dock in Liverpool, England, creating valuable records for future scientists. Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Heritage Images/Getty Images

How Fast Are Oceans Rising? The Answer May Be In Century-Old Shipping Logs

A century ago, the shipping industry recorded the daily ebb and flow of tides. Now, those records are becoming crucial for forecasting how fast sea levels are rising in a warming climate.

How Fast Are Oceans Rising? The Answer May Be In Century-Old Shipping Logs

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Adam Baske (left) and Capt. Rob Odlin of Running Tide Technologies in the Gulf of Maine. They release rope that's entwined with early-stage kelp, a fast growing seaweed that will soak up carbon dioxide. Fred Bever/Maine Public hide caption

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Fred Bever/Maine Public

'Run The Oil Industry In Reverse': Fighting Climate Change By Farming Kelp

MPR News

A Maine startup is drawing high-profile support for its low-tech plan to soak up carbon emissions. It says its kelp farms will sink to the ocean floor and lock the carbon away for millennia.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted 12-0, with one recusal, to recommend the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine for people aged 18 and older. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

CDC Panel Endorses Johnson & Johnson's 1-Dose COVID-19 Vaccine

Advisers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention voted to endorse the emergency use of a single dose of a vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson. A study showed it was 66% effective in the U.S.

Julianna Brion for NPR

There's Never A 'Right' Time For A Baby — But These Questions Can Help You Decide

Whether you've always wanted to be a parent or not, starting a family is a big decision. The pandemic makes it even tougher. In this episode, experts talk through what to consider.

There's Never A 'Right' Time For A Baby — But These Questions Can Help You Decide

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Before conducting the nasal swab test for COVID-19 at the Rantoul, Ill., clinic, researchers go out to greet each visitor and ask for basic identification and health information. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

To Help Farmworkers Get COVID-19 Tests And Vaccine, Build Trust And A Safety Net

Illinois Public Media - WILL

Getting COVID-19 tests and vaccine to essential workers on commercial farms and in meatpacking plants requires more than a pop-up clinic miles away. A positive test can be financially devastating.

To Help Farmworkers Get COVID-19 Tests And Vaccine, Build Trust And A Safety Net

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Empty shelves at a Target in Burbank, Calif., on March 14, 2020. Many people across the U.S. are approaching the one-year anniversary of the moment they went into lockdown and realized life as they knew had changed. Amy Sussman/Getty Images hide caption

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Amy Sussman/Getty Images

People Share #TheMoment They Realized The Pandemic Was Changing Life As They Knew It

It's been nearly a year since the coronavirus pandemic began. NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro asked people to share the moment they realized COVID-19 was changing their lives.

Former slave Felix Haywood, 92 years old when he was photographed in San Antonio in 1937, told an interviewer, "All we had to do was walk, but walk south, and we'd be free as soon as we crossed the Rio Grande." Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

A Chapter In U.S. History Often Ignored: The Flight Of Runaway Slaves To Mexico

As the U.S. Treasury considers putting Harriet Tubman on the $20 bill to honor her role in the northbound underground railroad, new attention is being paid to the often overlooked southbound route.

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