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Georgia voters cast their ballots in Chanblee for runoff elections in early January. Georgia's Republican lawmakers have proposed a number of changes to cut down on voting options. Virginie Kippelen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Virginie Kippelen/AFP via Getty Images

Georgia House Passes Elections Bill That Would Limit Absentee And Early Voting

Georgia Public Broadcasting

The Republican bill would enact more restrictions for absentee voting and cut back on weekend early voting hours favored by larger counties, among other changes.

Students attending school in Santa Clarita, Calif., last week. California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Monday that schools that offer in-person learning by the end of March will be eligible for a portion of funds totaling $2 billion. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

California Offers $2 Billion Incentive In A Push For In-Person Learning

Public schools that don't offer in-person instruction for K-2 students by the end of the month will lose out on 1% of eligible funds every day that students remain out of the classroom.

A person wears protective gloves and a face mask due to COVID-19 concerns while walking along an empty train platform at the Cortlandt Street station on March 21, 2020, in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

People Share #TheMoment They Realized The Pandemic Was Changing Life As They Knew It

It's been nearly a year since the coronavirus pandemic began. NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro asked people to share the moment they realized COVID-19 was changing their lives.

"As Texans struggled to survive this winter storm, Griddy made the suffering even worse as it debited outrageous amounts each day," Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said as his office sued the company. Here, electrical lines run through a neighborhood in Austin during the recent winter storms. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Sues Griddy, Saying Electricity Provider Misled Customers

The state says it received more than 400 complaints about Griddy in less than two weeks. One woman who was hit with $4,677 on her credit card said, "I do not have the money to pay this bill."

Sexual harassment allegations made against Gov. Andrew Cuomo by two former aides will be examined by independent investigators hired by the New York state attorney general's office. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Gov. Cuomo Grants N.Y. AG's Request To Investigate Sexual Harassment Allegations

Former aides to Cuomo have come forward with complaints of sexual harassment during their time in his administration. The investigation's findings will be disclosed in a public report.

A health care worker draws a dose of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine into a syringe for an immunization event in the parking lot of the L.A. Mission on Feb. 24. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Could A Single Dose Of COVID-19 Vaccine After Illness Stretch The Supply?

People who have been sick with COVID-19 may need only one dose of the normally two-shot vaccines. If that became policy it could extend vaccine supplies, but logistical challenges are daunting.

Pope Francis shakes hands with Joe Biden, then vice president, at the Vatican, in 2016. Andrew Medichini/AP hide caption

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Andrew Medichini/AP

In Pope Francis, Biden Has A Potential Ally — Who Shares The Same Catholic Detractors

The pope and the president share liberal stances on climate change and economic disparity. A theology scholar argues U.S. Catholic Church leadership is increasingly allied with the political right.

In Pope Francis, Biden Has A Potential Ally — Who Shares The Same Catholic Detractors

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Palestinian elementary school students wearing protective face masks take their seats in their classroom amid the coronavirus pandemic on the first day of class in September at a United Nations-run school in the West Bank city of Ramallah. Majdi Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Majdi Mohammed/AP

Israeli Health Officials To Government: Vaccinate All Palestinians

An outgoing high official told NPR that Israel has a public health imperative to protect all Palestinians from COVID-19, plus a humanitarian obligation.

France's former President Nicolas Sarkozy (left) arrives to hear the verdict in a corruption trial at Porte de Clichy court house in Paris on Monday. Nathan Laine/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Laine/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy Found Guilty Of Corruption

Sarkozy, who served as president from 2007 to 2012, was convicted of bribery and influence peddling. He was sentenced to three years in prison, with two of the years suspended.

Anti-junta protesters run from teargas fired by police during a demonstration in Yangon on Monday. At least 18 people were killed over the weekend as Myanmar police reportedly used live ammunition against protesters. Aung Kyaw Htet/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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Aung Kyaw Htet/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

Myanmar's Suu Kyi Appears Before Court As Supporters Continue Protests

The detained former leader appeared for a hearing Monday, a month after being ousted in a coup, as her supporters staged protests despite a deadly crackdown by police.

Julianna Brion for NPR

There's Never A 'Right' Time For A Baby — But These Questions Can Help You Decide

Whether you've always wanted to be a parent or not, starting a family is a big decision. The pandemic makes it even tougher. In this episode, experts talk through what to consider.

There's Never A 'Right' Time For A Baby — But These Questions Can Help You Decide

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