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The Trump administration has suggested buying a prescription drug is like buying a car — with plenty of room to negotiate down from the sticker price. But drug pricing analysts say the analogy doesn't work. tomeng/Getty Images hide caption

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tomeng/Getty Images

Car Shopping, Handbags And Wealthy Uncles: The Quest To Explain High Drug Prices

Trump administration officials say drugs' list prices are like cars' sticker prices — easily negotiated. But in the life and death world of medicine, health economists say, that analogy falls apart.

A wall titled, "Who's The Next To Drop Out?" with faces of the democratic candidates running for president in the 2020 Election on display during the Netroots Nation conference at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA on July 13, 2019. Natalie Piserchio/NPR hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio/NPR

Why Progressives Think Joe Biden Is Not 'Electable'

Progressive activists see 2020 as a chance to take control of the Democratic Party. They don't agree on who the best leader would be, but fear the former vice president would fail to excite voters.

A menstrual cup — this one is made of silicone rubber — is designed to collect menstrual blood. The bell-shaped device is folded and inserted into the vagina. The tip helps with removal. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Menstrual Cups: Study Finds They're Safe To Use — And People Like Them

A comprehensive analysis looks at the cup, its ability to prevent leaks — and whether it could be a viable alternative to pads and tampons in low-income countries.

In this 2011 photo, Hu Jintao, then China's president, visits the Confucius Institute at the Walter Payton College Preparatory High School in Chicago. China established more than 100 Confucius Institutes, which provide language and culture programs, at U.S. schools. But at least 13 universities have dropped the program due to a law that raises concerns about Chinese spying. Chris Walker/AP hide caption

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Chris Walker/AP

As Scrutiny Of China Grows, Some U.S. Schools Drop A Language Program

At least 13 U.S. universities have shut down their Confucius Institutes, which are funded by China's government. Critics say the program could be used to recruit spies or steal university research.

Giovani, with his son Jonathan (center), and twin daughters Catherine and Carla at a shelter in Ciudad Juárez. Giovani says that care has been hard for the family to get in Juárez. Paul Ratje for NPR hide caption

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Paul Ratje for NPR

'Vulnerable' Migrants Should Be Exempt From 'Remain In Mexico,' But Many Are Not

As migrants are returned to Mexican border cities, the government says it makes exceptions for those who are "vulnerable" to stay in the U.S. But advocates say that's not happening consistently.

'Vulnerable' Migrants Should Be Exempt From 'Remain In Mexico,' But Many Are Not

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Residente performs during Austin City Limits Festival in October 2018. The Puerto Rican rapper's latest song is a response to the island's protests against Gov. Ricardo Rosselló. Erika Goldring/FilmMagic hide caption

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Erika Goldring/FilmMagic

Residente, Bad Bunny Sound Off On Puerto Rico Protests With 'Afilando Los Cuchillos'

Amidst the most crucial political crisis to hit Puerto Rico in its modern history, Puerto Rican artists Residente, Bad Bunny and iLe respond with music in real time.

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Researchers Explore Why Women's Alzheimer's Risk Is Higher Than Men's

Scientists are gaining insights into why Alzheimer's is more common in women. The answer involves genetics, hormones and sex-related brain differences.

Researchers Explore Why Women's Alzheimer's Risk Is Higher Than Men's

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Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, a late entry to the 2020 race, hopes his red-state credentials will help him connect with voters. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Steve Bullock Vows To Disentangle 'Dark Money' From Politics

The Montana governor, one of the last Democratic candidates to join the presidential race, is focused on bringing "sunshine and transparency" to campaign finance.

Steve Bullock Vows To Disentangle 'Dark Money' From Politics

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An Amazon warehouse in Leipzig, Germany. The European Union's antitrust arm will evaluate the company's role as both a retailer and a marketplace for other retailers. Jens Schlueter/Getty Images hide caption

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Jens Schlueter/Getty Images

EU Investigates If Amazon Hurts Competition By Using Sellers' Data

The European Union's antitrust arm will evaluate Amazon's role as both a retailer and a marketplace for others. One focus will be on Amazon's use of data collected from third-party sellers.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks about the Green New Deal in Washington, D.C., on May 13. She has shined a spotlight on a once-obscure brand of economics known as "Modern Monetary Theory." Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

This Economic Theory Could Be Used To Pay For The Green New Deal

Liberal Democrats have embraced an obscure brand of economics — "Modern Monetary Theory" — to make the case for deficit-financed government programs like the Green New Deal for clean energy and jobs.

This Economic Theory Could Be Used To Pay For The Green New Deal

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Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, shown here on Capitol Hill in April, announced last month that most staff from two USDA research agencies were being relocated to the Kansas City region. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Scientists Desert USDA As Agency Relocates To Kansas City Area

The mandatory move imposed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture on most of the workers at two vital research agencies has been criticized as a "blatant attack on science."

Protesters gathered outside of Police Headquarters in Manhattan in May to protest during the police disciplinary hearing for Officer Daniel Pantaleo, who was accused of using a chokehold that led to Eric Garner's death in 2014. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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5 Years After Eric Garner's Death, Activists Continue Fight For 'Another Day To Live'

WNYC Radio

"There's not one day that goes by I don't think about Eric Garner," said activist Nupol Kiazolu. "All we're doing is fighting for equity and another day to live."

5 Years After Eric Garner's Death, Activists Continue Fight For 'Another Day To Live'

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Former acting Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights John Gore speaks at the Justice Department in 2018 in Washington, D.C. Gore and other Trump administration officials are accused of providing false or misleading statements about the origins of a citizenship question they tried to get on the 2020 census. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Trump Officials Face Cover-Up Allegations After Failed Citizenship Question Push

Challengers of the Trump administration's push for a census citizenship question are asking a federal judge in New York to impose penalties for allegedly false or misleading statements by officials.

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