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C'Artis Harris, walking with her children in 2017, was searching for housing that would accept her Section 8 voucher when NPR began following her in 2016. Today, Harris and her family still live in an area of high poverty. Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Trump Stokes Fear In The Suburbs, But Few Low-Income Families Ever Make It There

President Trump is appealing to suburban voters by promising they won't have to live near affordable housing. But 50 years after the Fair Housing Act, the truth is housing remains deeply segregated.

Trump Stokes Fear In The Suburbs, But Few Low-Income Families Ever Make It There

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Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden speaks during a campaign event at the Mountain Top Inn and Resort on October 27, 2020 in Warm Springs, Georgia. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Coronavirus Is A Key Campaign Issue: What's Joe Biden's Plan?

With cases surging, the coronavirus pandemic is heating up as an election issue. Voters have seen President Trump's approach to the crisis play out in real-time, but how would Biden handle things?

The number of women in the workforce overtook men for a brief period earlier this year. But the uncomfortable truth is that in their homes, women are still fitting into stereotypical roles of doing the bulk of cooking, cleaning and parenting. It's another form of systemic inequality within a 21st century home that the pandemic is laying bare. Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images

Stuck-At-Home Moms: The Pandemic's Devastating Toll On Women

Women have made great strides. But the uncomfortable truth is that in their homes, they are still fitting into stereotypical roles of doing the bulk of housework and parenting.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey testifies over video during a Senate Commerce Committee hearing on Wednesday about reforming Section 230, a key legal shield for tech companies. Greg Nash-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash-Pool/Getty Images

Days Before Election, Tech CEOs Defend Themselves From GOP Claims Of Censorship

The chief executives of Facebook, Twitter and Google face skepticism from a Senate committee over their decisions about what content to allow and what to take down from their platforms.

Hayley Powers Thonton-Kennedy for NPR

If You're Stopped By Police, You Have Rights To Protect You. Here's What To Remember

If you're stopped or pulled over by police, remember that you're entitled to certain rights and protections. NPR's Noel King spoke with attorney Atteeyah Hollie about what to keep in mind.

If You're Stopped By Police, You Have Rights To Protect You. Here's What To Remember

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A coal train stops near the White Bluff Plant near Redfield, Ark. in 2014. Entergy Arkansas agreed to eventually stop using coal at this and another plant under a settlement with environmental groups, but a dark money nonprofit funded by Wyoming is pushing to keep them operating. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

Wyoming Is Using Dark Money To Help Keep Coal Plants In Other States Open

Wyoming Public Radio

Wyoming is quietly supporting action elsewhere to preserve its coal-dependent economy. Experts on money in politics say they've never seen this before and find it troubling.

Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi, an Illinois Democrat, is calling on the Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission to investigate sales of a non-FDA approved drug marketed as a treatment for COVID-19. Tom Williams/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/AFP via Getty Images

Congressman Calls For Federal Crackdown On Unproven Coronavirus Treatment

An NPR investigation revealed a network of doctors marketing a non-FDA approved drug as a purported treatment for COVID-19. Now, Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-Ill.) is calling for federal enforcement.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., administers the judicial oath to Judge Amy Coney Barrett at the Supreme Court on Tuesday. Barrett's husband, Jesse, holds the Bible. Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States hide caption

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Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

A Newly Sworn In Justice Barrett Faces A Motion To Recuse Herself In Election Case

A Pennsylvania county is asking the new justice to disqualify herself because her nomination and confirmation is not only "unprecedented" but linked, by Trump, to his own re-election.

Used vehicles are parked on the sales lot at a CarMax store on Sept. 24 in Colma, Calif. CarMax reported a surge in earnings after used-car prices climbed steadily — and surprisingly — for months. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A Pandemic Sticker Shock: Used-Car Prices Are Through The Roof

The supply of used cars is tight, while demand is high. That can provide a big boost to car owners thinking of selling, but it can make affordable vehicles hard to find.

Victor Samuel Martinez-Rivera, Fernanda Ruiz Martinez, Heber Toscano and Alejandro Vasquez are voting for president for the very first time. Eve Edelheit, Deanna Dent and Xueying Chang/NPR hide caption

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Eve Edelheit, Deanna Dent and Xueying Chang/NPR

The Latinx Vote Comes Of Age

For the first time in election history, Latinos are projected to be the second-largest voting demographic in the country. The reason? Gen Z Latinx voters, many of whom are casting a ballot for the first time in 2020. So we asked a bunch of them: Who do you plan to vote for? What issues do you care about? And what do you want the rest of the country to know about you?

The Latinx Vote Comes Of Age

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A store advertises discounts in Santa Monica, Calif., on July 28 amid the coronavirus pandemic. Economic growth data on Thursday are expected to show a record-setting figure for the third quarter, but that covers the more worrisome picture underneath the surface. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

Last Report Card On U.S. Economy Before Elections Will Be A Blockbuster

The U.S. is expected to report record-setting economic growth in the most recent quarter. But that won't repair all of the damage done during the spectacular downturn three months earlier.

Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers speaks during a virtual news conference at the Department of Justice, Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2020 with FBI Director Christopher Wray. Sarah Silbiger/AP hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/AP

China Runs Illegal Intimidation Scheme Inside The U.S., DoJ Charges

Five people have been arrested and others are facing criminal charges in what Justice Department leaders called a plot by China's government to lean on political opponents with threats and extortion.

Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker answers questions from the media, along with Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, during his daily press briefing on the COVID-19 pandemic on May 22, in Springfield, Ill. Justin L. Fowler/AP hide caption

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Justin L. Fowler/AP

As COVID-19 Cases Surge In Illinois, A Clash Over Safety Guidelines

Illinois is experiencing an upsurge in cases, leading the governor to close indoor dining and bar service in some places in the state. But local leaders are not backing the new guidelines.

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Steve Davis is a longtime advocate for the poor. In his new book, Undercurrents: Channeling Outrage to Spark Practical Activism, he writes about five promising trends that could help lift people out of extreme poverty. Portrait by Stuart Isett. Book by Wiley hide caption

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Portrait by Stuart Isett. Book by Wiley

Why A Champion For The Very Poor Is Not Pessimistic. In Fact, He's Optimistic!

Steve Davis lays out the reasons for his (relatively) rosy outlook In his new book: Undercurrents: Channeling Outrage to Spark Practical Activism.

St. Augustine homes are surrounded by floodwater in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in 2017. The city experiences tidal flooding — often referred to as nuisance or "sunny day" flooding — between 12 and 16 times per year and frequently floods during heavy rains. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im

National

America's 'Oldest' City Struggles To Fight A Global Threat On A Small-Town Budget

WJCT News 89.9

Worsening floods threaten the heritage and economy of St. Augustine, Fla. City leaders are spending big to fight the deluge, but worry it won't be enough without a global push to address climate change.

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