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President Biden delivers remarks on the economy in the East Room of the White House on Monday, pushing back on critics who say the American Rescue Plan is making the economy worse. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Americans Will Lose Unemployment Benefits If They Turn Down Jobs, Biden Says

Biden said that his administration would not stand for people gaming the system, but pressed the importance of continued financial support for those left jobless as a result of the coronavirus crisis.

A man cries over the body of a victim of deadly bombings on Saturday near a school, at a cemetery west of Kabul on Sunday. More than 50 were killed in the attack, many of them pupils between 11 and 15 years old. More than 100 were wounded. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

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Mariam Zuhaib/AP

Afghanistan School Attack: Death Toll Rises, As Do Fears Over Sending Girls To School

"Should we ask children to go to school when the schools are not safe for them? Can we do that?" asks an education activist. One wounded student says she wants to go back. "Continue school," she says.

Afghanistan School Attack: Death Toll Rises, As Do Fears Over Sending Girls To School

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Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., left, and Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., raise their arms after addressing attendees of a rally, Friday, May 7, 2021, in The Villages, Fla. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

A Look At The GOP From Inside A Matt Gaetz, Marjorie Taylor Greene Rally

The two members of Congress may not have much power on the Hill, but they get celebrity treatment from Trump supporters.

A Look At The GOP From Inside A Matt Gaetz-Marjorie Taylor Greene Rally

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The Biden administration says the government will protect gay and transgender people against sex discrimination in health care. In this 2017 photo, Equality March for Unity and Pride participants march past the White House in Washington. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

U.S. Will Protect Gay And Transgender People Against Discrimination In Health Care

The announcement, which effectively reverses a Trump-era rule, springs from last summer's landmark Supreme Court decision banning employment discrimination against LGBTQ people.

A new report by GLAAD highlights the high rate of harassment and hate facing LGBTQ users on social media. In this photo, demonstrators rally in favor of LGBTQ rights outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in 2019. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Social Media Sites Must Change To Be Safe For LGBTQ Users, GLAAD Report Finds

LGBTQ social media users encounter hate speech and harassment at higher rates than all other identity groups at 64%, according to GLAAD's inaugural social media index report.

Carlene Knight, 54, is one of the first patients in a landmark study designed to try to restore vision in those who have a rare genetic disease that causes blindness. Josh Andersen/OHSU hide caption

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Josh Andersen/OHSU

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision

The unprecedented study involves using the gene-editing technique CRISPR to edit a gene while it's still inside a patient's body. In exclusive interviews, NPR talks with two of the first participants.

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision

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The Kindred Spirits sculpture in Midleton, County Cork, Ireland, pays tribute to a gift from the Choctaw nation to help during the 19th century potato famine. Ireland paid it back with donations to the Navajo and Hopi nations to help them during the pandemic. Gavin Sheridan hide caption

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Gavin Sheridan

What Native Americans Can Teach Us About Generosity In A Pandemic

It's inspiring when a spirit of generosity crosses national borders. But to fight this pandemic, rich nations must do their part. That's why we think Biden's stand on vaccine patents is a vital step.

Alex Gibney's new documentary on HBO is called The Crime of the Century. It details the role of the medical system in creating the opioid crisis. HBO hide caption

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HBO

Opioid Crisis: Filmmaker Details The Medical System's 'Crime Of The Century'

Documentary filmmaker Alex Gibney investigated the opioid crisis. He says it was created by pharmaceutical companies, distributors, pharmacists and doctors, all looking to profit.

Opioid Crisis: Filmmaker Details The Medical System's 'Crime Of The Century'

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tune-yards Pooneh Ghana/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Pooneh Ghana/Courtesy of the artist

Tune-Yards Shares The Inspiration Behind 'Sketchy'

XPN

When you listen to a song by Tune-Yards, it can be like listening to a beautiful, but abstract painting. Hear a live performance of songs from the band's latest album.

tune-yards on World Cafe

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Stock trader Peter Tuchman works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on March 9, 2020. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

I Came Close To Dying: Wall Street's Most Photographed Man Is Ready For Normalcy

If 100% of a firm's traders are fully vaccinated, they can start sending more to the stock exchange floor. They can eat lunch in their booths again. Masks will be optional in some parts of the floor.

I Came Close To Dying: Wall Street's Most Photographed Man Is Ready For Normalcy

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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, far right, Baltimore County Executive John Olszewski and Maryland House Speaker Adrienne Jones stand next to a new historic marker on Saturday in Towson, Md., that memorializes Howard Cooper, a 15-year-old who was dragged from a jailhouse and hanged by a mob in 1885. Brian Witte/AP hide caption

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Brian Witte/AP

Maryland Governor Grants Posthumous Pardons To 34 Black Lynching Victims

Maryland is the first state to issue a comprehensive set of pardons to the victims of lynching. Across the U.S., more than 4,000 Black people were lynched in acts of racial terror.

Howard University has prompted an outcry from students and scholars over its decision to dissolve its classics department, the only such program at a historically Black college or university in the nation. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Howard University's Decision To Cut Classics Department Prompts An Outcry

Howard is the nation's only historically Black university with a classics department, but it is now moving to dissolve the program after a three-year review of the school's curriculum.

Howard University's Decision To Cut Classics Department Prompts An Outcry

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Emerging In The U.S. After 17 Years, Cicadas Have Been In Chinese Art For Millennia

The insects' appearances stretch back 4,000 years, to a time when ancient settlers carved cicadas from jade and put them on tongues of the dead before burial, evoking transcendence and eternal life.

Robert Lee Johnson in his old neighborhood in Compton. Johnson remembers moving in one day in 1961. "I see moving vans, trucks and everything all down the street," he says. Johnson was 5 years old at the time, so he says he thought "it was moving day for everybody." And he noticed that all the other families moving in were were Black, too. Nevil Jackson for NPR hide caption

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Nevil Jackson for NPR

Black Americans And The Racist Architecture Of Homeownership

Generations of Black Americans have faced racist barriers to homeownership through various techniques, including "redlining" and "blockbusting." Even now, lending policies that drive up borrowing costs keep many from the American dream.

Black Americans And The Racist Architecture Of Homeownership

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