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A mother, Kum Sullivan, who's son Ben died of a heroin overdose in 2015, shows off a tatoo while attending a family addiction support group on March 23, 2016 in Groton, CT. She got the tatoo to commemmorate the year anniversary of his death. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Study: 42% of American adults know someone who died from an overdose

WBUR

Roughly 125 million people — know at least one person who has died of a drug overdose, according to a RAND Corporation study published Wednesday in the American Journal of Public Health.

Boeing announced a management shakeup - including the ouster of the leader of the 737 Max production line. At the Singapore Airshow, miniature models of Boeing aircraft including the 737 Max (front) are displayed on February 21, 2024. Roslan Rahman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP via Getty Images

Boeing ousts the head of its troubled 737 Max program after quality control concerns

The Boeing executive who oversaw the troubled 737 Max program, Ed Clark, has left the company. It's part of a broader management shakeup after a door plug panel blew off a jet in midair last month.

The International Space Station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour during a fly around of the orbiting lab on Nov. 8, 2021. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The International Space Station retires soon. NASA won't run its future replacement

NASA is crashing the ISS into the ocean at the end of 2030. The agency is collaborating with private companies to build its replacement. So what could the space stations of the near future look like?

The International Space Station retires soon. NASA won't run its future replacement.

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John Cheeks's lottery ticket matched the numbers posted online in January 2023. But when he tried to redeem his prize, he was repeatedly denied. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

A man sues Powerball after being told his $340M 'win' was a mistake

In early January 2023, John Cheeks saw that the winning Powerball numbers online matched his lottery ticket. But when he tried to redeem the prize he was told it was a "mistake." Now, he's suing.

Samuel Altman, CEO of OpenAI, looks on during a Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology, and the Law oversight hearing to examine artificial intelligence, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on May 16, 2023. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

As Congress lags, California lawmakers take on AI regulations

KQED

California often takes the lead with new legislation to rein in tech. This was true for privacy, social media and now it looks to be playing out the same way for generative AI.

As Congress lags, California lawmakers take on AI regulations

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E-bike use is increasing quickly, but many people do not wear helmets. And head injuries from e-bike accidents are rising fast too, a study in JAMA Surgery shows. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

E-bike head trauma soars as helmet use falls, study finds

A new study shows that nearly 8,000 e-bike riders sought hospital care for head injuries in 2022. It's a huge increase and the majority of the injured riders were not wearing helmets.

Julie Silverman had a very rare condition that went undiagnosed for years. Julie Silverman hide caption

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Julie Silverman

Doctors didn't think much of her cough. A nurse practitioner did and changed her life

After Julie developed a persistent cough, no one seemed to be able to identify the cause. Then, her unsung hero stepped in and saved her life.

Doctors didn't think much of her cough. A nurse practitioner did and changed her life

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Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona answers questions during the daily briefing in August 2021 at the White House in Washington. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Student loan balances wiped for the first batch of borrowers in Biden's SAVE plan

"It's moral hazard if you're only doing debt relief, but I believe we're balancing it out with accountability on colleges," says Education Secretary Miguel Cardona.

Student loan balances wiped for the first batch of borrowers in Biden's SAVE plan

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Chicago is suing big fossil fuel companies, alleging the impact of flooding and other climate-related events has caused great damage. Tyler Pasciak LaRiviere/Chicago Sun-Times hide caption

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Tyler Pasciak LaRiviere/Chicago Sun-Times

Chicago sues five giant oil companies, accusing them of climate change destruction, fraud

WBEZ

The suit says BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, Exxon Mobil and Shell have hurt the city by discrediting science even as their products lead to "catastrophic consequences," including strong storms, flooding, severe heat and shoreline erosion.

At the Mexican Consulate in Dallas, Mexican citizens can obtain a voter registration card and register to vote. Feb. 25 is the deadline to register to vote in this year's election. Stella M. Chávez/KERA News hide caption

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Stella M. Chávez/KERA News

Hundreds of thousands in the U.S. are ready to cast votes for Mexico's president

KERA News

The June 2 election will mark the first time the some 12 million Mexicans living the U.S. will be able to cast ballots in certain consulates. With two women as the frontrunners, the winner almost certainly will make history.

Boris Nadezhdin, a liberal Russian politician who was disqualified from the March presidential election, awaits a meeting of Russia's Central Election Commission in Moscow, Thursday, Feb. 8, 2024. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Why a disqualified Russian candidate remains a critic of Putin

When asked whether his political activities put him in danger, Boris Nadezhdin quoted a proverb, "If you are afraid of wolves, you should not go to the forest."

Why a disqualified Russian candidate remains a critic of Putin

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In this April 30, 2021, file image taken by the Mars Perseverance rover and made available by NASA, the Mars Ingenuity helicopter, right, flies over the surface of the planet. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

NASA is looking for people to test out its Mars simulator for a year

The agency is accepting applicants for the second cohort of its Mars simulator mission. Participants will live and work from a 3D-printed, 1,700-square-foot facility at NASA's Houston space center.

Lucidio Studio, Inc./Getty Images

Bad bosses, low pay, big mistakes: How to navigate the pitfalls of starting a new job

Just starting your career? Elainy Mata, host of the Harvard Business Review podcast New Here, offers advice on how to deal with issues that aren't part of the job description.

Bad bosses, low pay, big mistakes: How to navigate the pitfalls of starting a new job

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Jada Pinkett Smith's creative life. Matt Winkelmeyer/Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Winkelmeyer/Paul Hawthorne/Getty Images

Jada Pinkett Smith on playing Ozzfest, her love of painting and her marriage to Will

The actor is the kind of celebrity that makes headlines just by breathing, but those headlines miss a lot. It's Been A Minute sat down with her to talk what she got out of her time as a rock singer and why she looks at her marriage as a masterpiece.

Jada Pinkett Smith, the artist

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Former President Donald Trump attends a pre-trial hearing Thursday for charges he faces in a New York hush money case. Two civil judgments in New York put Trump on the hook for hundreds of millions of dollars. Steven Hirsch/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Steven Hirsch/Pool/Getty Images

Trump faces some half a billion dollars in legal penalties. How will he pay them?

Donald Trump owes legal penalties totaling hundreds of millions of dollars in two civil cases recently decided in New York, raising questions about how he'll pay the amount.

This illustration provided by the European Southern Observatory in February 2024 depicts the record-breaking quasar J059-4351, the bright core of a distant galaxy that is powered by a supermassive black hole. M. Kornmesser/AP hide caption

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M. Kornmesser/AP

Scientists have found a black hole so large it eats the equivalent of one sun per day

With a mass 17 billion times larger than our sun, this black hole is the fastest-growing black hole ever recorded, Australian National University said.

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