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Tiny Desk Premiere: Lise Davidsen

The Norwegian soprano, with plenty of horsepower, unleashes a high C, and much subtle singing in a thrilling set.

Students carrying signs on April 18, 2024 on the campus of USC protest a canceled commencement speech by its 2024 valedictorian who has publicly supported Palestinians. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

USC cancels filmmaker's keynote amid controversy over canceled valedictorian speech

USC announced the cancellation of a keynote speech by filmmaker Jon M. Chu just days after making the choice to keep the student valedictorian, who expressed support for Palestinians, from speaking.

Former President Donald Trump, flanked by attorneys Todd Blanche (left) and Emil Bove (right), arrives for his criminal trial as jury selection continues at Manhattan court on Thursday. Jabin Botsford/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/Getty Images

Jury selection ends in Trump hush money trial

Former President Donald Trump is present in the courtroom while New Yorkers answer personal questions about their ability to serve on the jury.

Jury selection ends in Trump hush money trial

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On Taylor Swift's 11th album, The Tortured Poets Department, her artistry is tangled up in the details of her private life and her deployment of celebrity. But Swift's lack of concern about whether these songs speak to and for anyone but herself is audible throughout the album. Beth Garrabrant /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Beth Garrabrant /Courtesy of the artist

Review

Music

Taylor Swift's 'Tortured Poets' is written in blood

With The Tortured Poets Department, the defining pop star of her era has made an album as messy and confrontational as any good girl's work can get.

Iranian worshippers walk past a mural showing the late revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini, right, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, left, and Basij paramilitary force, in an anti-Israeli gathering after their Friday prayer in Tehran, Iran, on Friday. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

What we know so far about Israel's strike on Iran — and what could happen next

Israel and Iran seem to be downplaying the attack, the latest in a series of retaliatory strikes between the two. Analysts say that could be a sign of the de-escalation world leaders are calling for.

"Our nation's educational institutions should be places where we not only accept differences, but celebrate them," U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, seen in the East Room of the White House in August 2023, said of the new Title IX regulation. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Biden administration adds Title IX protections for LGBTQ students, assault victims

The new rules also broaden the interpretation of Title IX to cover pregnant, gay and transgender students. They do not address whether schools can ban trans athletes from women's and girls' teams.

Doris Kearns Goodwin and Dick Goodwin were married in 1975. Marc Peloquin, courtesy of the author. hide caption

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Marc Peloquin, courtesy of the author.

A historian's view of 'an extraordinary time capsule of the '60s'

In her new book, Doris Kearns Goodwin revisits the '60s through her late husband Richard Goodwin's perspective—and her own.

A historian's view of 'an extraordinary time capsule of the '60s'

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Google has a contract with the Israeli government where it provides the country with cloud computing services. Not all Google employees are happy about that. Alexander Koerner/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Koerner/Getty Images

A Google worker says the company is 'silencing our voices' after dozens of employees are fired

The tech giant fired 28 employees who took part in a protest over the company's Project Nimbus contract with the Israeli government. One fired worker tells her story.

Google worker says the company is 'silencing our voices' after dozens are fired

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When the media covers scientific research, not all scientists are equally likely to be mentioned. A new study finds scientists with Asian or African names were 15% less likely to be named in a story. shironosov/Getty Images hide caption

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shironosov/Getty Images

Which scientists get mentioned in the news? Mostly ones with Anglo names, says study

A new study finds that in news stories about scientific research, U.S. media were less likely to mention a scientist if they had an East Asian or African name, as compared to one with an Anglo name.

A federally-funded program in New York will provide homeowners with rebates for energy-efficient home upgrades, like heat pumps. Rebecca Redelmeier/WSKG News hide caption

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Rebecca Redelmeier/WSKG News

From WSKG

New York residents will be first in the U.S. to get federal funds for energy-efficient appliances

WSKG News

New York is the first state in the country to receive an initial $158 million to implement a rebate program to help families save money on energy-efficient electric appliances.

There's more plastic waste in the world than ever. So, where did the idea come from that individuals, rather than corporations, should keep the world litter-free? Tim Boyle/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Boyle/Getty Images

Who created the idea of litter – and why? Play this month's Throughline history quiz.

Where did the idea come from that individuals, rather than corporations, should keep the world litter-free? What history is hidden in the trash? Find out here.

Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg listens at news conference in New York, Feb. 7, 2023. Donald Trump has made history as the first former president to face criminal charges. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Alvin Bragg, Manhattan's district attorney, draws friends close and critics closer

Alvin Bragg, Manhattan's District Attorney, has great friends and determined critics

Alvin Bragg, Manhattan's district attorney, draws friends close and critics closer

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Bar and pub trivia originated in England, but it's become a popular past time in the United States over the last twenty years. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Should phones be used at trivia nights? A D.C. cheating scandal begs the question

Smart phones at trivia night can make it easy to cheat. A cheating scandal shows it may be time to go back to pen and paper

Should phones be used at trivia nights? A D.C. cheating scandal begs the question

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Tens of thousands of people watched as dozens of colorfully decorated boats toured the Dutch capital's historic canals Saturday, Aug. 5, 2023, in the most popular event of a six-day Pride Amsterdam festival that attracts tens of thousands of visitors to the city. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Amsterdam was flooded with tourists in 2023, so it won't allow any more hotels

Twenty-six hotels that already have permits can move forward, but after that a hotel can only be built if one shuts down. Tourists spent about 20.7 million nights in Amsterdam hotels last year.

The CDC and FDA are investigating reports of patients in nearly a dozen U.S. states being injected with counterfeit Botox. Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images

Fake Botox has sickened patients nationwide. Here's what to know — and what to avoid

Public health authorities are investigating reports of counterfeit injections sickening 19 people across nine states. Experts say getting bona fide Botox starts with finding a trustworthy provider.

Kahlil Brown, 18, says teammate Deshaun Hill Jr., the student and quarterback who was shot and killed in 2022, was his best friend. Brown, shown posing for a portrait at the North Community High School football field in Minneapolis on April 9, will attend St. Olaf College in the fall. Caroline Yang for NPR hide caption

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Caroline Yang for NPR

Where gun violence is common, some students say physical safety is a top concern

The federal government is investing billions to bolster school safety and mental health resources to combat gun violence. But some sense a disconnect between those programs and what students need.

Where gun violence is common, some students say physical safety is a top concern

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Waxahatchee Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Waxahatchee renounced the 'tortured artist' trope on her latest album

WXPN

Waxahatchee's Katie Crutchfield talks about writing her latest album, Tigers Blood, from a place of happiness and peace.

Waxahatchee on World Cafe

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Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., speaks during a town hall hosted by the Democratic lawmaker at Montana Technological University, Nov. 10, 2023, in Butte, Mont. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

Democratic Sen. Jon Tester hopes to secure another win in deep-red Montana

Montana Public Radio

Tester is the last Democrat holding statewide office as Republicans have dominated recent elections in Montana. He's carved out an identity as a moderate and he hopes that will win him another term.

Democratic Sen. Jon Tester hopes to secure another win in deep-red Montana

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Gabrielle and Louis (Léa Seydoux and George MacKay) meet in 1910 Paris, 2014 Los Angeles and again in 2044 in The Beast. Carole Bethuel/Kinology hide caption

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Carole Bethuel/Kinology

'The Beast' jumps from 1910, to 2014, to 2044, tracking fear through the ages

Fresh Air

This wildly original adaptation of the Henry James novella The Beast in the Jungle follows human alienation and anxiety, asking why, in every era, we disengage from life and the people around us.

NYPD officers detain a person as pro-Palestinian protesters gather outside of Columbia University in New York City on Thursday. Officers cleared out a pro-Palestinian campus demonstration, a day after university officials testified about anti-Semitism before Congress. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

The NYPD breaks up a pro-Palestinian protest at Columbia University

Police began making dozens of arrests after Columbia University's president asked for help clearing protesters — citing the "encampment and related disruptions pose a clear and present danger."

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