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One of the paintings from Yolanda López's series "¿A Donde Vas, Chicana? Getting Through College" — self-portraits that show her running, in and around UC San Diego when she was a graduate student. Yolanda López/Images courtesy of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego hide caption

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Yolanda López/Images courtesy of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

Arts

A trailblazing Chicana artist's first museum show is opening — just weeks after she died

The exhibit at San Diego's Museum of Contemporary Art will include 50 of the artist's pieces, including the Virgen de Guadalupe triptych that remains one of Yolanda López's best known works.

A slice of the 12-layer chocolate cake known as "Bruce" is adorned with colorful sprinkles at the British bakery Get Baked. But regulators say the topping is illegal, as it includes a color additive that is permitted only for other uses. Courtesy of Get Baked hide caption

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Courtesy of Get Baked

'Sprinklegate' sinks a U.K. bakery's top sellers after topping is found to be illegal

"It is HIGHLY unlikely that we will find any legal sprinkles that we will use as a replacement," says Rich Myers, owner of the Get Baked bakery in Leeds. "I am extremely passionate about sprinkles."

A video call on a laptop screen during Christmas. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new guidance on Friday for safely celebrating the upcoming holiday season. FilippoBacci/Getty Images hide caption

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FilippoBacci/Getty Images

The CDC emphasizes COVID vaccinations as a key to safe holiday gatherings

The CDC says that having every person in attendance vaccinated is important for protecting those who can't get a shot. And it recommends that those who aren't fully vaccinated delay travel.

Police stand in a line outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

A Capitol Police officer is accused of telling a Jan. 6 suspect to hide evidence

Federal prosecutors have accused a U.S. Capitol Police officer of obstruction of justice for allegedly encouraging a suspect in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot to hide evidence of their participation.

A Capitol Police officer is accused of telling a Jan. 6 suspect to hide evidence

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The Carroll Independent School District in Southlake, Texas, is in the spotlight after an administrator reportedly instructed teachers to provide students with "opposing" views of the Holocaust when the subject of recent statewide legislation came up. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

In one Texas district, teachers were told to give 'opposing' views of the Holocaust

An administrator with the Southlake School District reportedly made the statement during a meeting when a new state law came up. It says multiple perspectives should be presented on certain topics.

Grete Bergman, left, and Sarah Whalen-Lunn at their StoryCorps recording in Anchorage, Alaska, in 2018. Camila Kerwin/StoryCorps hide caption

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Camila Kerwin/StoryCorps

With 3 bold marks, Indigenous women helped revive a once-banned tradition

Grete Bergman was among the first Gwich'in women to get traditional facial markings since colonizers barred the practice. She and markings artist Sarah Whalen-Lunn did it for their daughters.

With 3 bold marks, Indigenous women helped revive a once-banned tradition

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Sharmistha Chaudhuri (center, wearing pink), 35, at her wedding in Kolkata, India, in January 2020. Chaudhuri found some Indian wedding traditions retrograde, so she hired four feminist priestesses to officiate at hers. They performed a multilingual, egalitarian ceremony stripped of patriarchal traditions. Sharmistha Chaudhuri hide caption

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Sharmistha Chaudhuri

Hindu priestesses fight the patriarchy, one Indian wedding at a time

The priestesses are part of a feminist push to make Hinduism more inclusive. Some have begun officiating at Indian weddings stripped of patriarchal traditions: No more "donating" brides to in-laws.

Hindu priestesses fight the patriarchy, one Indian wedding at a time

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Nurse Christina Garibay administers Johnson & Johnson's COVID vaccine to a man at a community outreach event in Los Angeles in August. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

An FDA panel of experts backs J&J COVID vaccine booster shots

A panel of experts voted to recommend that the Food and Drug Administration authorize a booster dose of the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine at least two months after the first shot.

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