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Anti-government protesters gather below the one metal tree sculpture remaining after pulling down a second one, a monument that is emblematic of the government of Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega, at the Jean Paul Jennie round-about in Managua, Nicaragua. (AP Photo/Alfredo Zuniga) Alfredo Zuniga/AP hide caption

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Alfredo Zuniga/AP

Nicaragua's President Withdraws Social Security Reforms That Sparked Violent Unrest

A local human rights group says at least 25 people have been killed, and that the government is to blame. Now, President Daniel Ortega has called off the planned changes to the welfare program.

A sample of cannabidiol (CBD) oil is dropped into water. Supplements containing the marijuana extract are popular and widely sold as remedies for a variety of ailments and aches. But scientific evidence that they work hasn't yet caught up for most applications, researchers say. Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images

Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

An FDA advisory committee last week urged approval of a drug containing cannabidiol to treat a form of epilepsy. Other scientists wonder if CBD might ease anxiety or other disorders, too.

Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

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An Afghan member of medical staff cleans a stretcher following a suicide bombing attack in Kabul on April 22, 2018. (Photo by WAKIL KOHSAR / AFP) (Photo credit should read WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images) WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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WAKIL KOHSAR/AFP/Getty Images

Suicide Bomber Kills Dozens At Voting Center In Afghanistan

More than 50 people attempting to register to vote have been killed in a suicide blast in Afghanistan's capital, Kabul. The Islamic State claims responsibility.

Campaign staff member Aisha Chughtai (left) speaks with Erin Murphy (center), a Democratic candidate for Minnesota governor, at the campaign's St. Paul headquarters as colleague Charles Cox looks on. Chughtai and Cox are members of a newly formed campaign workers union. Brian Bakst/MPR News hide caption

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Brian Bakst/MPR News

Long Hours, Low Pay Push Some Democratic Campaign Workers To Unionize

MPR News

"It's been far too long that workers in this industry have been exploited," said Ihaab Syed, the secretary of the Campaign Workers Guild.

After two men were arrested at a Starbucks in Philadelphia, people are talking about how African-Americans are treated in public spaces. SAUL LOEB/Getty Images hide caption

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SAUL LOEB/Getty Images

Outrage Over Arrests At Philly Starbucks Fuels Twitter Conversations

The arrests of two black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks sparked Twitter users to share their stories of how African-Americans are treated in predominantly white spaces.

Outrage Over Arrests At Philly Starbucks Fuels Twitter Conversations

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A pedestrian walks past the Federal Election Commission's headquarters October 24, 2016 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

If A Parent's Day Job Is Running For Congress, Can The Campaign Pay For Child Care?

A congressional candidate is asking the Federal Election Commission to decide whether she's allowed to use campaign funds to pay for child care while she spends her days on the trail.

If A Parent's Day Job Is Running For Congress, Can The Campaign Pay For Child Care?

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Rhiannon Giddens Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

How Rhiannon Giddens Reconstructs Black Pain With The Banjo

The renowned folk songwriter stops by NPR's Washington D.C. headquarters to play two songs from her latest album and discuss the historical African-American roots of her music and of her instrument.

How Rhiannon Giddens Reconstructs Black Pain With The Banjo

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The new documentary by William Friedkin (left) centers around footage of an exorcism performed by Rev. Gabriele Amorth (right), who has performed the procedure tens of thousands of times. William Friedkin hide caption

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William Friedkin

'Exorcist' Director Makes A New Movie About Exorcism (It's A Documentary)

William Friedkin had never actually witnessed an exorcism. Then he recorded the footage at the center of The Devil And Father Amorth. "I was scared, seriously scared," he says.

'Exorcist' Director Makes A New Movie About Exorcism (It's A Documentary)

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'Bring The War Home' Shows 'Lone Wolf' Terrorists Are Really Part Of A Pack

Kathleen Belew's new book explores the impact of the Vietnam War on America's white power movement; Belew says that movement was behind a lot of domestic terror attacks attributed to "lone wolves."

'Bring The War Home' Shows 'Lone Wolf' Terrorists Are Really Part Of A Pack

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Zoologist Lucy Cooke says we infantilize pandas because they look cute. "We don't think of them as bears," she says. "We think of them as helpless evolutionary mishaps." Though captive breeding programs get a lot of press, she wishes that there were more emphasis on maintaining their natural habitat. Above, panda cubs at a conservation center in Wenchuan in China's southwestern Sichuan province. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Who Cares If They're Cute? This Zoologist Accepts Animals On Their Own Terms

Zoologist Lucy Cooke says humans aren't doing animals any favors when we moralize their behavior. Her book The Truth About Animals is organized around "fact and not sentimentality."

Who Cares If They're Cute? This Zoologist Accepts Animals On Their Own Terms

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