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False conspiracy theories have always been a part of U.S. history, but experts say they're spreading faster and wider than ever before. Matt Williams for NPR hide caption

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Matt Williams for NPR

'More Dangerous And More Widespread': Conspiracy Theories Spread Faster Than Ever

While false conspiracies aren't new, experts say their reach is spreading – accelerated by social media, encouraged by former President Trump, and weaponized in a way that is unprecedented.

'More Dangerous And More Widespread': Conspiracy Theories Spread Faster Than Ever

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Rep. James Clyburn, D-SC, chairman of the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis, listens at a hearing on Oct. 2, 2020, in Washington, D.C. Michael A. McCoy/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael A. McCoy/Pool/Getty Images

One Medical's Coronavirus Vaccine Practices Spark Congressional Investigation

The House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis is investigating after NPR reported that the boutique health care provider allowed ineligible patients to skip the COVID-19 vaccine line.

One Medical's Coronavirus Vaccine Practices Spark Congressional Investigation

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A bus believed to be carrying former U.S. special forces member Michael Taylor and his son Peter, who allegedly staged the operation to help fly former Nissan chief Carlos Ghosn out of Japan in 2019, leaves Narita International Airport in Japan on Tuesday. JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images

2 Americans Extradited To Japan On Accusation Of Aiding Carlos Ghosn Escape

The U.S. father and son arrived in Tokyo after fighting extradition. They're accused of helping former Nissan Motors Chairman Carlos Ghosn flee Japan as he awaited trial.

Georgia voters cast their ballots in Chanblee for runoff elections in early January. Georgia's Republican lawmakers have proposed a number of changes to cut down on voting options. Virginie Kippelen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Virginie Kippelen/AFP via Getty Images

Georgia House Passes Elections Bill That Would Limit Absentee And Early Voting

Georgia Public Broadcasting

The Republican bill would enact more restrictions for absentee voting and cut back on weekend early voting hours favored by larger counties, among other changes.

A visual representation of the digital Cryptocurrency, Bitcoin. The digital currency's meteoric rise has minted millionaires and energized true believers around the world. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Bitcoin: Revolutionary Breakthrough, Or Mother Of All Bubbles

From 21st century carmaker Tesla to 170-year-old life insurer MassMutual. From banks to the auction house Christie's. They have all opened their doors to cryptocurrency, bringing it to the mainstream.

The first box of the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine departs from the McKesson facility in Shepherdsville, Kentucky on Monday. The company is set to distribute its first 3.9 million doses across the country this week. Timothy D. Easley/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/Getty Images

Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Rollout Begins In U.S. As COVID-19 Cases Tick Up

Johnson & Johnson has started shipping its first vaccine doses across the U.S., adding a third vaccine to the country's arsenal as public health officials warn of an uptick in cases.

The red-cockaded woodpecker has been listed as endangered for more than half a century. Chuck Hess/USFS hide caption

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Chuck Hess/USFS

How The Military Helped Bring Back The Red-Cockaded Woodpecker

North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC

The U.S. military and conservation groups forged an unusual alliance to help save the red-cockaded woodpecker, but a Trump-era move to take it off the endangered list could threaten the bird.

How The Military Helped Bring Back The Red-Cockaded Woodpecker

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As a researcher at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, Alice Mukora says she understands the need to enroll diverse populations in Alzheimer's research. But that would be more likely to happen, she notes, if people of color had better experiences getting Alzheimer's care. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Siri Stafford/Getty Images

'Providers Don't Even Listen': Barriers To Alzheimer's Care When You're Not White

Nonwhite Americans looking for care for a loved one are much more likely than whites to encounter discrimination, language barriers, and providers who lack cultural competence, a new report finds.

Farmers, traders and customers weave through waist-high heaps of chili peppers, piles of ginger and mounds of carrots at a government-run wholesale market in western India. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Demonstrations have been going on for months. Pop stars and climate activists have pledged support for the farmers. What sparked the movement is less glamorous: New rules for wholesale markets.

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

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Sexual harassment allegations made against Gov. Andrew Cuomo by two former aides will be examined by independent investigators hired by the New York state attorney general's office. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Gov. Cuomo Grants N.Y. AG's Request To Investigate Sexual Harassment Allegations

Two former aides to Cuomo have come forward with complaints of sexual harassment during their time in his administration. The investigation's findings will be disclosed in a public report.

Joe Delagrave (c) is co-captain of the USA Wheelchair Rugby team. The squad was practicing at a recent training camp in Birmingham, Ala. at the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Training site. Lexi Branta Coon/Courtesy USA Wheelchair Rugby hide caption

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Lexi Branta Coon/Courtesy USA Wheelchair Rugby

The Tokyo Olympics Are On — For Now — As Athletes Train Through The Uncertainty

The Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics were delayed a year by the coronavirus pandemic. Now, there's as much uncertainty as there was a year ago. The athletes are doing their best to focus on their training.

The Tokyo Olympics Are On — For Now — As Athletes Train Through The Uncertainty

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"As Texans struggled to survive this winter storm, Griddy made the suffering even worse as it debited outrageous amounts each day," Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said as his office sued the company. Here, electrical lines run through a neighborhood in Austin during the recent winter storms. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Sues Griddy, Saying Electricity Provider Misled Customers

The state says it received more than 400 complaints about Griddy in less than two weeks. One woman who was hit with $4,677 on her credit card said, "I do not have the money to pay this bill."

Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary-General Jan Egeland visiting displaced families in the Muhamasheen community in Amran, Yemen, on Sunday. Michelle Delaney/NRC hide caption

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Michelle Delaney/NRC

As Yemenis Starve To Death, Humanitarian Relief Group Pleas For International Help

Jan Egeland of the Norwegian Refugee Council is on the ground in Yemen. The United Nations is asking for funding as tens of thousands are already starving to death and millions more go hungry.

As Yemenis Starve To Death, Humanitarian Relief Group Pleas For International Help

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