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Zinzile Majola, 27-year-old singer of Friends Band, says it felt like a window opening when Mugabe left. "It actually gave us more confidence that things would change from now on, from the way they were, from the way they used to be," Majola says. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Politics In Zimbabwe Has A New Soundtrack

Ebba Chitambo, 66, made music during Zimbabwe's fight for independence. Now, he's giving advice to a new generation of musicians about writing political music.

Politics In Zimbabwe Has A New Soundtrack

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A peacock butterfly in Hurworth-on-Tees, England, in 2013. Peacock butterflies are one of the species the Big Butterfly Count is tracking, with the help of citizen volunteers. Chris Golightly/Flickr hide caption

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Chris Golightly/Flickr

Britain's Big Butterfly Count Begins, With David Attenborough Leading The Charge

For the next three weeks, citizen volunteers in the United Kingdom will be tallying the painted ladies, peacocks and brimstones they see, to help create a nationwide count — and soothe their souls.

Starbucks is opening it's first deaf-friendly store in the U.S., where employees will be versed in American sign language and stores will be designed to better serve deaf people. Courtesy of Starbucks hide caption

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Courtesy of Starbucks

Starbucks To Open First 'Signing Store' In The U.S. To Serve Deaf Customers

The store will be in Washington D.C., and will not only focus on hiring employees fluent in American Sign Language, but also on lighting and design that makes it easier for the deaf to communicate.

Kenia Guerrero, 23, stands on the El Paso, Texas, side of the Paso del Norte International Bridge, also known as the Santa Fe Street Bridge — a port of entry into the U.S. from Mexico. Guerrero is from Juarez just across the border but says she feels just as at home in El Paso. Denise Tejada/Youth Radio hide caption

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Denise Tejada/Youth Radio

Young People Adapt To A Changing Life At The Texas-Mexico Border

Youth Radio

Growing up, young residents in the region didn't sense much of a divide between the U.S. and Mexico. But crossing the border these days, says Kenia Guerrero, 23, of Mexico, "You are sometimes afraid."

Young People Adapt To A Changing Life At The Texas-Mexico Border

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Meg Myers' Take Me To The Disco is on our shortlist for the best albums out on July 20. Brantley Gutierrez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Brantley Gutierrez/Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: 6 Albums You Should Hear Now

This week features sultry R&B from The Internet, seething rock from songwriter Meg Myers, the "Joy" of Ty Segall & White Fence, a new album from the bluegrass group Punch Brothers and more.

New Music Friday for July 20: Six Albums You Should Hear Now

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North Korean viewers watch a giant television screen outside the central railway station in Pyongyang, which was broadcasting news of the Singapore summit last month between Kim Jong Un and President Trump. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

North Korean Economy Suffered Sharpest Drop In 2 Decades, South Says

Not since 1997 has the country's gross domestic product shrunk at such a large rate in a single year, according to a report by the Bank of Korea. And the bank says sanctions are responsible.

Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos listens as President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House on June 21, 2018. DeVos issued new guidance last fall on how campuses should handle cases of sexual assault. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Administration Defends Campus Sexual Assault Rules

Government lawyers were in federal court Thursday for a hearing in a lawsuit over guidelines that would allow schools to demand a higher standard of evidence, making it tougher to prove an assault.

Trump Administration Defends Campus Sexual Assault Rules

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