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The Young People's Chorus of New York City, performing back in better times. Alexey Konkov/Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Alexey Konkov/Courtesy of the artists

Is Singing Together Safe In The Era Of Coronavirus? Not Really, Experts Say

Schools, faith and community groups as well as professional musicians are all struggling with the risks of singing. Experts present the most recent research and offer strategies to mitigate the risks.

Is Singing Together Safe In The Era Of Coronavirus? Not Really, Experts Say

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Officials at North Paulding High School in Dallas, Ga have suspended in-person learning for at least two days following a cluster of virus cases was discovered at the school. Above a crowd of students packs a hallway on Aug. 4. Twitter via AP/AP hide caption

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Twitter via AP/AP

Georgia High School 'Temporarily' Switches To Virtual Learning After 9 Positive Tests

North Paulding High School made headlines when images of crowded hallways were posted on social media. The school is now switching to virtual learning for at least two days.

Bureau of Land Management Acting Director William Perry Pendley speaking at a conference for journalists in Fort Collins, Colo., last October. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

Why A Vote For Trump's Lands Appointee May Put Some Western Republicans In A Bind

Republican senators facing tough reelections may be in the hot seat when it comes time to vote on President Trump's controversial nominee to head the nation's largest public lands agency.

Why A Vote For Trump's Lands Appointee May Put Some Western Republicans In A Bind

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Most people with COVID-19 get over it relatively quickly. Marjorie Roberts has been living with COVID-19 for months. Marjorie Roberts hide caption

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Marjorie Roberts

What It's Like When COVID-19 Lasts For Months

Some people who get COVID-19 are stuck with lasting debilitating symptoms. Two women share their stories of how they've been suffering for the "long haul."

What It's Like When COVID-19 Lasts For Months

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President Trump signs executive actions regarding coronavirus economic relief during a news conference in Bedminster, N.J., on Saturday. A number of lawmakers are criticizing the measures' substance and constitutionality. Jim Watson /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson /AFP via Getty Images

Democrats Slam Trump's Executive Actions, Critiquing Both Substance And Legality

One expert told NPR that the unemployment measure is particularly controversial because it is "using appropriated funds by Congress in ways that Congress might not have intended."

Parasites play crucial roles in keeping ecosystems healthy, as does this larval trypanorhynch tapeworm, which infects fish. Chelsea Wood hide caption

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Chelsea Wood

Save The Whales. Save The Tigers. Save The Tapeworms?

Scientists say parasites are important parts of ecosystems, but many are at risk of extinction. So, they're calling for a parasite conservation movement.

Save The Whales. Save The Tigers. Save The Tapeworms?

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Now Is The Time To Start Biking

Lots of people are buying bikes and hitting the road during COVID-19. So if you've thought about getting a bike, now's the time. In this episode, we'll talk about what you need to get started, and some strategies to stay safe.

Now Is The Time To Start Biking

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The Youngstown Vindicator published its last paper last August after 150 years in circulation. A new site, Mahoning Matters, has launched in its wake and hopes to be a home for local watchdog journalism. Jeff Swensen for The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Swensen for The Washington Post via Getty Images

Youngstown, Ohio, Lost Its Only Paper. A 'Zombie' News Site Wants To Fill The Void

Nearly one year since The Vindicator went out of business, the new site Mahoning Matters is hoping to become a destination for local watchdog journalism.

CBP is testing autonomous surveillance towers like this one, parked at the Border Security Expo in San Antonio, to improve the tracking of illegal crossers. Critics of the border wall say the government should favor virtual technology over steel and concrete. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Border Patrol Faulted For Favoring Steel And Concrete Wall Over High-Tech Solutions

The Department of Homeland Security watchdog has criticized Border Patrol for not looking for a cheaper alternative to President Trump's border wall, such as cutting-edge surveillance technology.

Near Liu's village, Xiguozhuang was the first village in the township of Yanshi, Shandong, to have its houses torn down. Fewer than a dozen homes remain along the village's main road. Amy Cheng/NPR hide caption

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Amy Cheng/NPR

China Speeds Up Drive To Pave Rural Villages, Put Up High-Rises

After quickly building megacities, the country is kicking plans into high gear to revamp tens of thousands of country villages. Residents say they are forced or coerced to leave their farm homes.

China Speeds Up Drive To Pave Rural Villages, Put Up High-Rises

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World leaders pledged $298 million to assist Lebanon in the aftermath of last week's catastrophic blast during a virtual summit on Sunday. French President Emmanuel Macron organized the virtual summit. Christophe Simon/AP hide caption

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Christophe Simon/AP

At Virtual Summit, World Leaders Pledge $298 Million In Aid To Lebanon

World leaders, including President Trump, attended a virtual donor summit Sunday for recovery efforts after last week's blast. The event was co-hosted by the U.N. and French President Emmanuel Macron.

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai, center, is arrested by police officers at his home in Hong Kong on Monday. Hong Kong police arrested Lai and raided the publisher's headquarters in the highest-profile use yet of the new national security law Beijing imposed on the city after protests last year. AP hide caption

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AP

Prominent Hong Kong Publisher Arrested Under New National Security Law

Jimmy Lai, a Hong Kong media tycoon known as a fervent supporter of democracy and human rights, is the most prominent figure arrested thus far under China's new national security law.

A man wearing a protective mask walks next to travelers as they line up to board a boat in Stockholm, Sweden. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP via Getty Images

Why Herd Immunity Won't Save Us

Herd immunity. It makes sense theoretically. But the reality, in this coronavirus pandemic, is potentially full of risk and probably unachievable.

Why Herd Immunity Won't Save Us

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Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank President Neel Kashkari visits "Maria Bartiromo's Wall Street" at Fox Business Network Studios on October 11, 2019. Kashkari is calling for a return to mandated lockdowns in every state for up to six weeks in an effort to save both lives and the economy in response to COVID-19. Roy Rochlin/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Rochlin/Getty Images

A National Lockdown Could Be The Economy's Best Hope, Says Minneapolis Fed President

Neel Kashkari, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, is calling for a six-week lockdown to save lives and the economy.

Dean Black is the GOP Duval county chair, which includes Jacksonville, Fla. American History teacher Monique Sampson recently decided to vote for Joe Biden. Duval county hasn't voted for a Democratic president since Jimmy Carter in 1976. But in recent presidential elections, it's begun tilting more toward the Democratic party. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

How This Conservative Florida County Became A Surprise 2020 Battleground

Duval County in northeast Florida hasn't voted for a Democratic presidential candidate since Jimmy Carter in 1976, but this year might be different.

How This Conservative Florida County Became A Surprise 2020 Battleground

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After she contracted COVID-19, Linda Harrison, right, was able to cast an emergency ballot in Texas' primary with the help of an intern and a doctor's note. Her husband, Vernon Webb, was also sick and wasn't able to vote. Courtesy Linda Harrison and Vernon Webb hide caption

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Courtesy Linda Harrison and Vernon Webb

'It's Ridiculous': States Struggle To Accommodate COVID-19 Positive Voters

Texas Public Radio

In Texas, COVID-19 positive voters can be put in the position of choosing between their right to vote and the public's health.

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