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A ship is seen off the coast of Gaza near a U.S.-built floating pier constructed to facilitate aid deliveries, as seen from the central Gaza Strip, on May 16, 2024. Abdel Kareem Hana/AP/AP hide caption

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Abdel Kareem Hana/AP/AP

U.S. Army aid vessels become unmoored near floating Gaza pier

Rough seas drove two vessels to beach in Israel and two others to anchor on a Gaza beach. Israeli forces are assisting recovery operations near the pier, U.S. officials said. There were no injuries.

Composer Richard Sherman performs at The Los Angeles Children's Chorus' Annual Gala in 2015. Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images
Composer Richard Sherman performs at The Los Angeles Children's Chorus' Annual Gala in 2015.

Composer Richard Sherman performs at The Los Angeles Children's Chorus' Annual Gala in 2015.

Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

Disney composer Richard M. Sherman has died at 95

Sherman and his brother Robert became Disney Studios' first ever in-house songwriters. They won two Oscars for their songs and score to Mary Poppins and composed the classic "It's a Small World."

President Joe Biden speaks to the Class of 2024 during commencement exercises at West Point on Saturda in West Point, New York. The West Point graduation is held at Michie Stadium and includes roughly 1,000 cadets graduating and commissioning into the Army as second lieutenants. Spencer Platt/Getty Images/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images/Getty Images North America

During West Point commencement speech, Biden applauds U.S. military role abroad

President Biden delivered his first commencement speech as commander-in-chief to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. There, he did not shy away from discussing the growing conflict in Europe and the Middle East.

Sean Baker holds the Palme d'Or for the film 'Anora,' during the awards ceremony of the 77th international film festival, Cannes, southern France, Saturday, May 25, 2024 (Photo by Andreea Alexandru/Invision/AP) Andreea Alexandru/Andreea Alexandru/Invision/AP/Invision hide caption

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Andreea Alexandru/Andreea Alexandru/Invision/AP/Invision

'Anora' wins Palme d'Or at the 77th Cannes Film Festival

Sean Baker's dramedy starring Mikey Madison won the annual film festival's top honor.

Grayson Murray holds the trophy after winning the Sony Open golf event, on Jan. 14, 2024, at Waialae Country Club in Honolulu. The 30-year-old died on Saturday, according to PGA Tour officials. Matt York/AP/AP hide caption

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Matt York/AP/AP

Grayson Murray, a 2-time PGA Tour winner, dies at 30

Murray pulled out of the Charles Schwab Challenge in Fort Worth a day before his death. No cause of death was given. He spoke openly about his battle with mental health and excessive alcohol use.

This combination photo shows Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump at a campaign rally on May 1, 2024, in Waukesha, Wis., left, and presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. during a campaign event, Oct. 9, 2023, in Philadelphia. Trump is addressing the Libertarian National Convention Saturday, May 25, 2024, courting a segment of the conservative electorate that's often skeptical of the former president's bombast while trying to ensure attendees aren't drawn to independent White House hopeful Kennedy, Jr. (AP Photo) AP/AP hide caption

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Trump is a Republican. RFK is a Democrat. They're both wooing Libertarians

The Libertarian Party's national convention will select its presidential nominee — and feature speeches from Donald Trump and independent candidate Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.

Trump and RFK aren't Libertarians, but are speaking at the party's convention

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Florida A&M University announced a "transformative" donation earlier this month — but the school said it ceased contact with the donor after questions arose about the funds. Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A mega-gift for an HBCU college fell through. Here's what happened — and what's next

To people who watch high-level philanthropy, Florida A&M's embarrassing incident wasn't only a shocking reversal. It was something they've seen before. The school is now investigating what went wrong.

The "Rally for Life" march at the Texas State Capitol in Austin in January. Even groups that support abortion are asking for more clarity on exceptions to the state's abortion bans. Suzanne Cordiero/AFP via Getty Images/AFP hide caption

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Suzanne Cordiero/AFP via Getty Images/AFP

New rules are in the works about abortion bans in Texas. Almost nobody's happy

The Texas Medical Board has drafted guidelines for doctors to decide when an abortion is necessary and legal under the state's strict ban. The rules were widely panned at a recent public hearing.

Cows graze at a dairy farm in La Grange, Texas, that sells raw milk to the public.










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Chiara Eisner/NPR

Limited testing of raw milk for bird flu leaves safety questions unanswered

An avian flu outbreak in dairy herds has stoked tensions between the federal government and raw milk advocates. Milk testing could provide assurances and useful data, but some farmers oppose it.

Limited testing of raw milk for bird flu leaves safety questions unanswered

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Davy and Natalie Lloyd were among three missionaries killed in Haiti after being ambushed at the Port-au-Prince, officials with the mission organization said Friday, May 24, 2024. The name of the third person killed wasn't immediately available. (Brad Searcy Photography via AP) Brad Searcy Photography/via AP hide caption

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Brad Searcy Photography/via AP

A young couple from the U.S. were among 3 missionaries killed in Haiti violence

A U.S. missionary couple and a Haitian man who worked with them were shot and killed by gang members in Haiti's capital after they were attacked while leaving a youth group activity held at a local church, a family member said Friday.

President Biden greets supporters and volunteers during a campaign event at Mary Mac's Tea Room in Atlanta on May 18. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

In Georgia, Biden’s coalition has frayed since his narrow win in 2020

President Biden eked out a win in Georgia last time, a victory that helped take him over the top in the Electoral College. But there are some warning signs it could be hard to do it again in 2024.

In Georgia, Biden’s coalition has frayed since his narrow win in 2020

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Displaced Palestinians in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip carry their belongings as they leave following an evacuation order by the Israeli army on May 6, 2024, amid the ongoing conflict between Israel and Hamas. -/AFP via Getty Images/-AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP via Getty Images/-AFP via Getty Images

Nearly 1 million Palestinians are fleeing Rafah and northern Gaza

The city had been the last refuge in the Gaza Strip for more than 1 million displaced Palestinians. Since Israeli forces began moving in, it is the scene of the largest mass movement in seven months of war.

Carol Leone, chair of piano studies at Southern Methodist University's Meadows School of the Arts, performs there in 2016 on a Steinway grand piano rebuilt with a smaller keyboard by DS Standard. Courtesy Hannah Reimann. hide caption

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Courtesy Hannah Reimann.

Pianist Hannah Reimann advocates for narrower pianos to help those with small hands

NPR Music

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Hannah Reimann, founder of Stretto Piano Events, which seeks to make narrower instruments more widely available for musicians with smaller hands.

Pianist seeks 'equity' with narrower instruments

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TOPSHOT - Mothers participate in the launch of the extension of the worlds first malaria vaccine (RTS, S) pilot program for children at risk of malaria illness and death within Kenyas lake-endemic region at Kimogoi Dispensary in Gisambai on March 7, 2023. - The pilot program coordinated by the World Health Organization (WHO) has provided malaria vaccines in three countries, Ghana, Malawi and Kenya, since 2019. More than 1.2 million children under five years old have received at least one dose of the four-dose vaccine in Africa. According to the WHO, the vaccine has been estimated to save one childs life for every 200 children vaccinated. Around 90 percent of the world's malaria cases are recorded in Africa, where 260,000 children die from the disease each year. (Photo by YASUYOSHI CHIBA / AFP) (Photo by YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP via Getty Images) Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images/Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images/Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP via Getty Images

New malaria vaccine delivered for the first time

The Central African Republic is the first country to receive thousands of doses of a new malaria vaccine recommended by the World Health Organization last October.

Malaka Gharib hide caption

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Malaka Gharib

Malaka Gharib

COMIC: How to make peace with your guilty feelings

Exercises to help you cope with negative feelings around guilt (like shame or embarrassment) — and motivate better behavior in the future.

COMIC: How to make peace with your guilty feelings

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View of vials on a production line at the factory of British multinational pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) in Saint-Amand-les-Eaux, northern France, on December 3, 2020, where the adjuvant for Covid-19 vaccines will be manufactured. Francois Lo Presti/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Francois Lo Presti/AFP via Getty Images

Negotiators for the global pandemic treaty couldn't meet their deadline

The World Health Organization hoped to have a treaty ready for ratification at its assembly next week. On Friday, WHO leader Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said negotiators couldn't resolve all the sticking points in time.

U.S. Airman Roger Fortson answers the door of his apartment on May 3, 2024, as captured by the body camera of the Okaloosa County Sheriff's Deputy responding to a report of a domestic disturbance. A split second later, the deputy fired at Fortson, killing him. Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office/Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office/Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office

Two men were killed while pointing guns at the ground. Should police have waited?

What are police trained to do when faced with someone armed who is not pointing the gun? What does cognitive research say? This month's police killing of men in Florida and Alaska have resurfaced hard questions as police encounter more people with guns.

Recent deaths bring up hard questions as police encounter more people with guns

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Alaska's Kuspuk School District serves 318 students spread across a rural region equivalent to the size of the state of Maryland. Even with teachers on J-1 Visas, 20% of teaching positions at the district were never filled this year. April, 2024.

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Emily Schwing for NPR

A visa program draws foreign teachers to a rural Alaska school district with a staffing crisis

KYUK

Teacher retention and recruitment is difficult and some schools make use of J-1 Visas to recruit teachers from outside the U.S. In one rural school district in Alaska, foreign teachers make up over half the staff.

Then-Texas state Rep. Jasmine Crockett is joined by Democratic lawmakers during a news conference on July 23, 2021, in Washington, D.C. Crockett, now a member of Congress, got into a verbal spat with Georgia Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene at a committee hearing last week. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images/Getty Images North America

A verbal spat between Reps. Crockett and Greene highlights racial and gender tensions

After Georgia Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene insulted the appearance of Rep. Jasmine Crockett, a controversial, viral moment was born.

Illustrations © 2024 by Brian Cronin/Rocky Pond Books hide caption

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Illustrations © 2024 by Brian Cronin/Rocky Pond Books

Illustrations © 2024 by Brian Cronin/Rocky Pond Books

When Baby Sloth tumbles out of a tree, Mama Sloth comes for him — s l o w l y

Did you know on average a sloth will fall out of a tree once a week for its entire life? It's true — and the inspiration for Brian Cronin and Doreen Cronin's new children's book, Mama in the Moon.

PICTURE THIS: MAMA IN THE MOON

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Hurricane Ian killed more than 150 people when it slammed into Florida in 2022. Here, Fort Myers, Fla. resident Stedi Scuderi looks over her apartment after flood water from the storm inundated it. Joe Raedle/Getty Images/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images/Getty Images North America

The 2024 Atlantic hurricane season will be 'extraordinary,' forecasters warn

The National Hurricane Center is predicting the largest number of storms ever forecast for the Atlantic, putting tens of millions of Americans at risk.

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