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NPR's Nina Totenberg with the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in 2018. Rebecca Gibian/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Gibian/AP

A 5-Decade-Long Friendship That Began With A Phone Call

NPR's Nina Totenberg first encountered law professor Ruth Bader Ginsburg in 1971. They became close friends after Ginsburg moved to Washington to serve on the federal appeals court.

A 5-Decade-Long Friendship That Began With A Phone Call

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Renee-Lauren Ellis, a Washington, D.C.-area attorney, says, "It's dire that something as fundamental as what I do with my body is up for debate still, in 2020." Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Ginsburg's Death A 'Pivot Point' For Abortion Rights, Advocates Say

The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg sets up a brutal nomination fight, and abortion rights is likely to be a contentious issue.

Ginsburg's Death A 'Pivot Point' For Abortion Rights, Advocates Say

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Republican Sen. Susan Collins' 2018 vote in favor of President Trump's second Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, has been a notable issue for Maine voters. Greg Nash/The Hill/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/The Hill/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Susan Collins: Whoever Wins The Presidential Election Should Fill SCOTUS Vacancy

The Maine Republican says, "The decision on a lifetime appointment to the Supreme Court should be made by the President who is elected on November 3rd."

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., rallies the crowd of 2,500 people during a vigil Saturday night for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, D.C. Cheryl Diaz Meyer/Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Diaz Meyer/Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR

Ginsburg Vigil Draws Tears, Protests Against McConnell

Sen. Elizabeth Warren forcefully condemned the Senate Majority leader at the vigil: "What Mitch McConnell does not understand is this fight has just begun."

A federal judge in San Francisco has blocked the Trump administration's order that would have banned Chinese-owned app WeChat, which millions in the U.S. use to stay in touch with family and friends and conduct business in China Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Federal Judge Blocks Trump Administration's U.S. WeChat Ban

A judge in San Francisco said Trump's order targeting the popular Chinese-owned app has a "modest" basis in national security and represents a free speech violation for U.S. users of the app.

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in July. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

TikTok Ban Averted: Trump Gives Oracle-Walmart Deal His 'Blessing'

U.S. tech company Oracle is joining hands with Walmart to become a technology partner with TikTok, an arrangement that satisfies the White House's concerns over the security of American user data.

If elected, Democratic nominee Joe Biden would become only the second Catholic president in American history. Here he prays at Grace Lutheran Church in Kenosha, Wis., on Sept. 3. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

How Joe Biden's Faith Shapes His Politics

Joe Biden's Catholic faith, friends and staffers say, is central to how he views the world.

How Joe Biden's Faith Shapes His Politics

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President Trump, pictured in the Oval Office on Thursday, maintains a lead over Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden on the economy, but is behind on handling of the coronavirus pandemic in a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Poll: Climate Becomes Top Priority For Democrats; Trump Struggles On Race, COVID-19

President Trump's handling of coronavirus pandemic and race relations are weighing down his reelection campaign. He continues, however, to have an advantage on the economy.

James Baldwin debated William F. Buckley in February 1965. Khalil Muhammad and David Frum are reimagining that debate for the 2020 March on Washington Film Festival. Jenkins/Getty Images and Evening Standard/Getty Images hide caption

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Jenkins/Getty Images and Evening Standard/Getty Images

Reimagining The James Baldwin And William F. Buckley Debate

In 1965, the two intellectuals debated whether the American dream "is at the expense of the American Negro." The Atlantic's David Frum and Harvard's Khalil Muhammad are now revisiting the question.

Niticia Mpanga, a registered respiratory therapist, checks on an ICU patient at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas. The mortality rates from COVID-19 in ICUs have been decreasing worldwide, doctors say, at least partly because of recent advances in treatment. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19

One thing that has improved a lot over the course of the pandemic is treatment of seriously ill COVID-19 patients in intensive care units. Here's one man's success story.

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19

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In her new book, Modern Madness: An Owner's Manual, Terri Cheney, who lives with bipolar disorder, shares advice for dealing with anxiety and depression and helping loved ones through a crisis. Neha Gupta/Getty Images hide caption

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Neha Gupta/Getty Images

Listen, Open Up, Connect: A Mental Health Expert's Advice On Living Through A Crisis

Decades of living with bipolar disorder was "training" for the coronavirus pandemic, says Terri Cheney, whose new book shares lessons for navigating mental illness — and the times we live in.

Suzy Margueron (seated, center) who advocates for people with hearing loss, likes to gather with friends in Paris' Luxembourg Gardens. All have transparent masks, but say it's others who should be wearing them too. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

France Encourages Use Of Transparent Masks To Help Those With Hearing Loss

Some 10% of the population is hard of hearing. The government is helping companies cover costs of making see-through masks. "It's a protection, but it's also a communication tool," says an official.

(Left) During the coronavirus pandemic, cleaning has become more intense and important. Gloves used for cleaning photographer Celeste Alonso's house in Buenos Aires, Argentina. (Right) Plants on Alonso's balcony. Celeste Alonso hide caption

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Celeste Alonso

Photographer Uses Instant Images To Make Sense Of Life In Isolation

When Argentina went into strict lockdown in March, Celeste Alonso was isolated in her home in Buenos Aires. She has been asserting what control she can over daily life, one Polaroid at a time.

Rhea Seehorn as Kim Wexler, Bob Odenkirk as Jimmy McGill in Better Call Saul, an Emmy snub but a Deggy winner. Greg Lewis/AMC/Sony Pictures Television hide caption

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Greg Lewis/AMC/Sony Pictures Television

Sunday The Emmys, But First The Deggys

NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans tells us who he thinks should win the 72nd Primetime Emmy Awards with his own prize he calls The Deggys.

Sunday The Emmys, But First The Deggys

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Life in Florida, "like in the rest of the world, has been transformed," says photographer Saul Martinez. "People are trying to find spaces of normalcy." Indoor movie theaters no longer offer that. But on a spring night, the Walter and Young families found a change of venue — a drive-in theater — can be a way to reimagine that space. March 14. Fort Lauderdale. Saul Martinez/@EverydayGuatema hide caption

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Saul Martinez/@EverydayGuatema

PHOTOS: How The World Is Reinventing Rituals

Religious services. Birthday parties. Movie nights. Our usual routines and rituals may not be possible because of COVID-19. So humans are creating new ways to hold true to their past traditions.

Tamika Palmer spoke at the March on Washington last month at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. At left is Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, and at right is Rev. Al Sharpton. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Breonna Taylor's Mother: 'I Won't Go Away. I'll Still Fight'

Tamika Palmer says she wants the officers who killed her daughter to be charged. "Even in the very beginning of this year, she kept saying 2020 was her year," she said. "And she was absolutely right."

Breonna Taylor's Mother: 'I Won't Go Away. I'll Still Fight'

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A memorial for Breonna Taylor is seen during the Good Trouble Tuesday march for Breonna Taylor on Tuesday, Aug. 25 in Louisville, Ky. Amy Harris/Amy Harris/Invision/AP hide caption

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Amy Harris/Amy Harris/Invision/AP

Police Settlements: How The Cost Of Misconduct Impacts Cities And Taxpayers

Payouts range from multi-million-dollars to far less but the financial impact is often overlooked. One argument in the protests over policing is that funds for police could be better used elsewhere.

Police Settlements: How The Cost Of Misconduct Impacts Cities And Taxpayers

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