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Annelise Capossela for NPR

'Tis the season for coping with SAD, or seasonal affective disorder

It's getting darker and colder, and there's still a pandemic. Oh, and then there's seasonal affective disorder. Here's how to spot it and what you can do.

'Tis the season for coping with SAD, or seasonal affective disorder

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James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of a teen accused of killing four students in a shooting at Oxford High School, pled not guilty to involuntary manslaughter charges on Saturday. Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Oakland County Sheriff's Office via AP

Parents of Michigan school shooting suspect are held on $500,000 bond after manhunt

Authorities had been searching for James and Jennifer Crumbley since Friday afternoon, after a prosecutor filed involuntary manslaughter charges against them. Their son is charged with murder.

Mount Semeru releases volcanic materials during an eruption as seen from Lumajang, East Java, Indonesia, Sunday, Dec. 5, 2021. The highest volcano on Indonesia's most densely populated island of Java spewed thick columns of ash, searing gas and lava down its slopes in a sudden eruption triggered by heavy rains on Saturday. Trisnadi/AP hide caption

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Trisnadi/AP

At least 13 people are dead after volcano erupts on the Indonesian island of Java

Mount Semeru, located on Indonesia's most densely populated island, spewed thick columns of ash more than 40,000 feet into the sky, and sent searing gas and lava flowing down its slopes.

Swimmer Lydia Jacoby won gold at the Tokyo Games in the 100-meter breaststroke. Thanks to changes in the NCAA's rules, the Seward, Alaska, resident has signed a partnership deal while keeping her plans to attend college. Valerie Kern/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Valerie Kern/Alaska Public Media

SPORTS

Olympian Lydia Jacoby just made a deal that wouldn't have been possible a few months ago

KDLL

Before June, student athletes had to choose between playing college sports or going pro. Now that the NCAA lifted that rule, Jacoby has signed with a swimwear company — and kept her plans to attend UT Austin next year.

Retired Special Forces Maj. Ian Fishback, seen in December 2019, deployed four times to Afghanistan and Iraq. In 2005, he blew the whistle on U.S. troops who were torturing people in Iraq. New America/Flickr hide caption

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New America/Flickr

The final, anguished years of a warrior-scholar who exposed torture by U.S. troops

Ian Fishback was a Green Beret who exposed torture by U.S. troops in Iraq. He did four combat tours and earned a Ph.D. in philosophy. Fishback died last month at 42, under court-ordered medical care.

The final, anguished years of a warrior-scholar who exposed torture by U.S. troops

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People gather at the memorial for the dead and wounded outside of Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., on Friday. A 15-year-old has been charged as an adult with murder and terrorism. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Michigan shooting suspect is among thousands of U.S. minors charged as adults each year

Prosecutors charged the 15-year-old accused of killing four students and injuring others at a Michigan High School as an adult. Thousands of children are tried or incarcerated as adults each year.

Michigan shooting suspect is among thousands of U.S. minors charged as adults yearly

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Strata-East Records founders, from left: Trumpeter Charles Tolliver and pianist Stanley Cowell, photographed in 1970. David Redfern/Redferns/Getty hide caption

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David Redfern/Redferns/Getty

Strata-East at 50: How a revolutionary record label put control in artists' hands

To celebrate their 50-year anniversary, we trace the history and legacy of the independent jazz record label Strata-East founded by trumpeter Charles Tolliver and the late pianist Stanley Cowell.

Strata-East at 50: How a revolutionary record label put control in artists' hands

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This Hanukkah lamp, made in Italy in the 19th century, depicts Judith holding a sword in one hand and the severed head of Holofernes in the other. The Jewish Museum, New York / Art Resource, NY hide caption

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The Jewish Museum, New York / Art Resource, NY

A hidden Hanukkah tale of a woman, an army and some killer cheese

Many Jewish families celebrate with foods like latkes. But some also eat dishes like blintzes that are made with cheese. How did cheese make it into the menu? The story starts with a beautiful widow.

This 1775 revolutionary-era rifle was Thomas Gavin's undoing. Courtesy of the Museum of the American Revolution hide caption

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Courtesy of the Museum of the American Revolution

Thomas Gavin might be America's most prolific artifact thief — but the jig is up

Thomas Gavin went on a tear in the '60s and '70s, hitting nearly a dozen museums on the east coast. He mostly stole antique firearms and stashed them in his hideout — a barn in rural Pennsylvania.

Thomas Gavin might be America's most prolific artifact thief — but the jig is up

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In this courtroom sketch, Ghislaine Maxwell is seated at the defense table while watching the testimony of witnesses during her trial on Tuesday in New York. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

What happened this week in the Ghislaine Maxwell trial

The federal trial of the former companion of late financier and convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein began in earnest this week. She's accused of grooming girls on his behalf.

The trial of Ghislaine Maxwell: What happened this week

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A man receives a dose of a COVID-19 vaccine in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. The omicron variant, first identified in South Africa, has now spread to at least a dozen other countries. On Friday, scientists presented evidence that the variant spreads twice as fast as the delta variant. Denis Farrell/AP hide caption

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Denis Farrell/AP

New evidence shows omicron likely spreads twice as fast as delta in South Africa

"This wave seems much faster than the delta wave. And we thought the delta wave was really fast. It's unbelievable," says Juliet Pulliam, the scientist who presented the new analysis at a conference.

New evidence shows omicron likely spreads twice as fast as delta in South Africa

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Vice President Harris and Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg tour electric vehicle operations at a Charlotte Area Transit System bus garage on Thursday. The two were in North Carolina to promote the new infrastructure law. Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

Potential 2024 rivals Harris and Buttigieg ally to sell Biden agenda

With President Biden approaching 80 years old, the political spotlight has been trained more brightly than usual on the pair. Here's a look at their political prospects.

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If your plant is rootbound — where the roots have wrapped around the inside of the pot and are outgrowing it — it might be time to upgrade to a bigger pot. Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Why does my plant look sad? 6 tips for raising happy houseplants

Eager to bring new plants home, but aren't sure where to begin? This episode will get you started with the basics of houseplant care — from watering schedule to light conditions. Because anyone can become a green thumb with a little time and attention.

Why does my plant look sad? 6 tips for raising happy houseplants

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Must Hear

Lil Nas X's "Montero (Call Me By Your Name)" is NPR Music's best song of 2021. Charlotte Rutherford/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Charlotte Rutherford/Courtesy of the artist

Lil Nas X on 'MONTERO,' NPR Music's song of the year

A conversation with the singer, rapper, social media sensation and fashion icon about his groundbreaking pop banger "MONTERO (Call Me By Your Name)."

Lil Nas X on 'MONTERO,' NPR Music's song of the year

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Two separate groups of fans from the Philippines take a photo together before the BTS concert at SoFi Stadium in Inglewood, Calif., on Nov. 27. Hannah Yoon for NPR hide caption

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Hannah Yoon for NPR

BTS returns to the stage reuniting their ARMY of fans after a 2-year hiatus

Fans from across the country and the world came to see the Korean boy band perform in Los Angeles for their first live concert in two years. Photographer Hannah Yoon documented fans before the show.

David Oyelowo plays Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in the 2014 film Selma, pictured here in a still from the film. Selma film hide caption

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Selma film

What three films and their Black characters reveal about America's ideas on race

A new book Colorization: One Hundred Years of Black Films in a White World unpacks the lens through which Black characters have been seen. Will Haygood, the author, explores this using three movies.

What three films and their Black characters reveal about America's ideas on race

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Andrea D'Aquino for NPR

5 tips on being a kinder neighbor and fostering a sense of community

What does it mean to be a kinder, more caring neighbor? From Daniel Tiger's world of make-believe to Winnipeg, here's how to plug into your community, practice small acts of kindness and boost your mood. We'll also think critically about being neighborly when things get complicated.

5 tips on being a kinder neighbor and fostering a sense of community

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Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban gives a press conference following a meeting of prime ministers of central Europe's informal body of cooperation, called the Visegrad Group (V4) in Budapest, Hungary, last month. Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images

A discomfort with Western liberalism is growing in Eastern Europe

People of the former Soviet bloc rejoiced when the Iron Curtain fell and embraced membership in the European Union. Hungary is an example of a growing culture clash in the conservative East.

A discomfort with Western liberalism is growing in Eastern Europe

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Stewart Indian School students are seen in a classroom in Carson, Nev., in an undated photo. The state of Nevada plans to fully cooperate with federal efforts to investigate the history of Native American boarding schools. Courtesy of Stewart Indian School Cultural Center and Museum via AP hide caption

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Courtesy of Stewart Indian School Cultural Center and Museum via AP

Nevada's governor apologizes for the state's past role in Indigenous schools

Gov. Steve Sisolak apologized on behalf of his state and promised to cooperate with an investigation of the federal government's past policies and oversight of Native American boarding schools.

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