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Lara Downes: Tiny Desk Concert

In a springtime concert, pianist Lara Downes decked our upright piano with tons of florals which made perfect for her performance of an arrangement of Schubert's "Belief in Spring."

A lethal injection gurney is seen at the at Nevada State Prison, a former penitentiary in Carson City, Nev., in 2022. Emily Najera for NPR hide caption

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Emily Najera for NPR

States botched more executions of Black prisoners. Experts think they know why

A study showed states made more mistakes when executing Black prisoners by lethal injection than they did with prisoners of other races. Execution workers and race experts said they're not surprised.

States botched more executions of Black prisoners. Experts think they know why

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Moncher Metina outside her house in Limonade, Haiti, on March 17, 2024. Octavio Jones for NPR hide caption

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Octavio Jones for NPR

A portrait of Haitians trying to survive without a government

Haiti is on the verge of collapse, with little to no government. But many Haitians have already learned to live without the support of the state, as NPR discovered traveling to Cap-Haïtien.

A portrait of Haitians trying to survive without a government

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Former Atlanta Braves player Gary Cooper poses for a portrait in his hometown of Savannah, Ga. Benjamin Payne/GPB News hide caption

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Benjamin Payne/GPB News

From Georgia Public Broadcasting

An ex-MLB player needs just one more day on a roster to get a pension. Will the Braves help him?

WRAS

Gary Cooper spent 42 days on the Atlanta Braves in 1980, but his life afterward has been challenging. A public petition is asking the Braves to add him to the roster for just one more day so he can get a $550 a month pension.

Gabrielle and Louis (Léa Seydoux and George MacKay) meet in 1910 Paris, 2014 Los Angeles and again in 2044 in The Beast. Carole Bethuel/Kinology hide caption

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Carole Bethuel/Kinology

'The Beast' jumps from 1910, to 2014, to 2044, tracking fear through the ages

Fresh Air

This wildly original adaptation of the Henry James novella The Beast in the Jungle follows human alienation and anxiety, asking why, in every era, we disengage from life and the people around us.

Connie Hanzhang Jin

Our sun was born with thousands of other stars. Where did they all go?

Our sun was born in a cosmic cradle with thousands of other stars. Astrophysicists say they want to find these siblings in order to help answer the question: Are we alone out there?

COMIC: Our sun was born with thousands of other stars. Where did they all go?

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An empty room is pictured in a concrete house in Matam, Senegal. Many families don't have electricity nor the means to own a fan or air conditioning to help quell the intense heat at night, temperatures can stay around 35 degree Celsius throughout the night. John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images

Lethal heat in West Africa is driven by human-caused climate change

The recent deadly heat in West Africa is driven by human activities, including the burning of fossil fuels, particularly in the wealthy Northern Hemisphere, according to an international report.

Aaron Hunter doing physical therapy at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital's outpatient center in Sarasota on Oct. 12, 2023. After getting shot in the head last June, Aaron struggled with weakness and balance on the left side of his body. He spent months in physical therapy before being discharged in February. Stephanie Colombini/WUSF hide caption

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Stephanie Colombini/WUSF

Guns are killing more U.S. children. Shooting survivors can face lifelong challenges

WUSF News

Guns are now the leading cause of death among American children. And many more children are injured in shootings, putting them at risk for life-altering disability, pain, and mental trauma.

Guns are killing more U.S. children. Shooting survivors can face lifelong challenges

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The president of Columbia University, Nemat Shafik, testified before the House Education Committee alongside a Columbia University law professor and two trustees. Tom Williams/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/Getty Images

At an antisemitism hearing, a Columbia official tells lawmakers, 'We have a moral crisis'

Columbia University officials answered lawmaker questions about antisemitism on campus. But Wednesday's hearing played out very differently from the 2023 hearing that grabbed so many headlines.

At antisemitism hearing, Columbia official tells lawmakers, 'We have a moral crisis'

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A father helps his son steady a firearm at the National Rifle Association (NRA) annual convention on May 28, 2022, in Houston, Texas. Exposing children to guns comes with risks, but some firearms enthusiasts say they'd prefer to train kids to use guns responsibly. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Amid concerns about kids and guns, some say training is the answer

The number of U.S. children dying from gunshot wounds has climbed in recent years. Keeping guns out of reach is one way to curb the trend — others argue to teach kids to handle guns responsibly.

Amid concerns about kids and guns, some say training is the answer

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Hannah Allen attends Hudson County Community College and is the mother of three children. "First you put your kids," she says. "Then you put your jobs, then you put your school. And last, you put yourself." Yunuen Bonaparte/The Hechinger Report hide caption

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Yunuen Bonaparte/The Hechinger Report

College is hard enough — try doing it while raising kids

Hechinger Report

More than 5 million college students are also parents. But many colleges do little to support them. Most don't even offer child care.

Wildfire smoke covered huge swaths of the U.S. in 2023, including places like New York City, where it has historically been uncommon. New research shows the health costs of breathing in wildfire smoke can be high. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

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David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Wildfire smoke contributes to thousands of deaths each year in the U.S.

Two new studies show the unseen toll smoke is taking on people across the country. Climate change is likely to make the problem even bigger.

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump walks with Poland's President Andrzej Duda at Trump Tower in midtown Manhattan in New York on Wednesday, April 17, 2024. Stefan Jeremiah/AP hide caption

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Stefan Jeremiah/AP

Poland's president visits Donald Trump as allies eye a possible return

Former President Donald Trump met Wednesday with Polish President Andrzej Duda, the latest in a series of meetings with foreign leaders as they brace for the possibility of a second Trump term.

A set of four tubes known as the "river outlet works," pictured on Nov. 2, 2022, could soon be the only way for water to make it through Glen Canyon Dam. Recently-discovered damage to those tubes has raised questions about their role going forward. Alex Hager/KUNC hide caption

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Alex Hager/KUNC

Damage at Glen Canyon Dam has Colorado River users concerned

KUNC

Newly discovered damage to part of the dam holding back America's second-largest reservoir has people who rely on the Colorado River worried about their ability to get the water they need.

A screenshot of a video from the website Storyful shows an elephant walking through Butte, Mont., after escaping from a nearby circus on Tuesday. Storyful/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Storyful/Screenshot by NPR

Watch: A circus elephant runs loose in a Montana town before being recaptured

The animal was having a routine bath when she was startled by a truck backfiring and ran away before being recaptured by handlers. Videos of the unexpected sight were shared widely on social media.

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