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David Xol of Guatemala hugs his son Byron as they were reunited at Los Angeles International Airport in January. The father and son were separated 18 months earlier under the Trump administration's "no tolerance" migration policy. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

Parents Of 545 Children Separated At U.S.-Mexico Border Still Can't Be Found

A court filing said many of the parents are presumed to no longer be in the United States. Efforts to locate them have been hampered by the coronavirus pandemic, according to the filing.

Hatice Cengiz says her accusations against Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman over the murder of Jamal Khashoggi would not receive a fair trial in Saudi Arabia. She is seen here earlier this month at the 16th Zurich Film Festival in Switzerland. Valeriano Di Domenico/Getty Images for ZFF hide caption

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Valeriano Di Domenico/Getty Images for ZFF

Jamal Khashoggi's Fiancee Sues Saudi Crown Prince Over Journalist's Killing

"This brutal and brazen crime was the culmination of weeks of planning and conspiratorial actions," says a lawsuit filed in a U.S. court Tuesday.

Ghislaine Maxwell, seen here at center right with the disgraced late financier Jeffrey Epstein, gave a deposition in 2016 that should be released, an appeals court says. Maxwell is seen here with Epstein and others a party at the Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach. Davidoff Studios Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Davidoff Studios Photography/Getty Images

Jeffrey Epstein Update: Court Says Ghislaine Maxwell's Deposition Can't Remain Secret

The mandate is a victory for Virginia Giuffre, who has publicly accused Maxwell of helping Jeffrey Epstein sexually abuse her when she was a minor.

A mural honors George Floyd at the intersection of 38th St. and Chicago Ave., where he was killed by Minneapolis police on May 25, inspiring protests and police reform efforts. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Federal Government Unveils New Initiative To Help Police Departments, Offers Aid To Minneapolis

Justice Department officials unveiled a new initiative Tuesday to establish a grant program and national center to help with defining policies and training officers.

This trio of images acquired by NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft shows a region in Bennu's northern hemisphere. The larger image shows a 590-foot wide area with many rocks, including some large boulders (close-up shown top right), and a "pond" mostly devoid of large rocks (bottom right). The boulder is approximately the size of a humpback whale. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid

NASA has collected and is returning its first sample from an asteroid. The rocks and dust could help us understand potentially dangerous space rocks and the history of the solar system.

A NASA Spacecraft Successfully Touched Down On A Rocky Asteroid

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Shoppers buy face masks on O'Connell Street in Dublin city centre on Tuesday. Ireland's government is putting the country at its highest level of coronavirus restrictions for six weeks in a bid to combat a rise in infections. Niall Carson/AP hide caption

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Niall Carson/AP

Ireland To Impose 6-Week National Lockdown

Under the lockdown, nonessential retail businesses will be closed, and restaurants and bars will be takeout only. Residents are to stay within about a 3-mile radius of their homes.

A health care worker prepares to screen people for the coronavirus at a testing site in Landover, Md., in March. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Health Care Workers Ask Therapist: 'Why Aren't More People Taking This Seriously?'

The pandemic continues to exact a heavy emotional toll on health care workers, says Kimberly Johnson, who provides them with free therapy. "I wish people knew ... what I saw," clients tell her.

Health Care Workers Ask Therapist: 'Why Aren't More People Taking This Seriously?'

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Claude Mabowa, 21, of the Democratic Republic of Congo, is an Ebola survivor who lost four family members to the virus. He's sitting in the bedroom of a sister who died of Ebola. John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images

Ebola Never Went Away. But Now There's A Drug To Treat It

Regeneron — the pharmaceutical company developing COVID-19 treatments — has just received FDA approval for the first drug aimed at another infectious disease that's been in the headlines.

Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, is pictured on Sept. 9 on Capitol Hill. Collins says a vaccine would not be approved for emergency use before late November at the earliest. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images

NIH Director 'Guardedly Optimistic' About COVID-19 Vaccine Approval By End Of 2020

But Dr. Francis Collins says it's unlikely a vaccine will be approved before late November. He also urges people to trust health experts like Anthony Fauci who "don't really have an ax to grind."

NIH Director 'Guardedly Optimistic' About COVID-19 Vaccine Approval By End Of 2020

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A photo taken in July shows what's left of the Jeffrey asbestos mine in Asbestos, Quebec. The town has voted to change its name to Val-des-Sources. Eric Thomas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thomas/AFP via Getty Images

The Town Of Asbestos, Quebec, Chooses A New, Less Hazardous Name

The former mining town has watched its name transform from an asset in the late 1800s to a liability in recent decades. Residents voted to change the name to Val-des-Sources, or valley of the springs.

Children listen as Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks as he visits East Las Vegas Community Center, Friday, Oct. 9, 2020, in Las Vegas. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

'They've Dismissed Us': How Latino Voter Outreach Still Falls Short

Latinos are the second-largest group of eligible voters by race or ethnicity in the United States, but they continue to be misunderstood and underappreciated by political campaigns of all parties.

'They've Dismissed Us': How Latino Voter Outreach Still Falls Short

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National Transportation Safety Board member Jennifer Homendy (right) walks with other NTSB officials past a makeshift memorial for victims of the Conception boat fire in September 2019 in Santa Barbara, Calif. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Safety Board Blames California Diving Boat's Owner For Fire That Killed 34

The fire started in the boat's salon, where divers had plugged in phones and other devices. Investigators pointed to the lack of a night watchman as a reason for high casualty numbers.

Open enrollment is about to start for those buying private insurance off state or federal exchanges. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images

Obamacare Open Enrollment Starts Nov 1. Here's What's Changing This Year

Kaiser Health News

The Affordable Care Act's future is uncertain and there's no end in sight to the pandemic. But for the 2021 insurance year consumers can expect to see modest increases in prices, if any.

A police marksman and his dog observes convicted killer Peter Madsen threatening police with detonating a bomb while attempting to break out of jail in Albertslund, Denmark on Tuesday. Nils Meilvang/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nils Meilvang/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images

Danish Inventor Who Murdered Journalist On Submarine In 2017 Briefly Escapes Prison

Peter Madsen, who was sentenced two years ago for the murder and dismemberment of Swedish journalist Kim Wall, bluffed his way out of prison with a fake bomb strapped to his abdomen.

Hawaiian Airlines jets outside Daniel K. Inouye International Airport in Honolulu. Hawaii has seen a more than 90% reduction in the number of air travelers arriving since the start of the pandemic. Ryan Finnerty/Hawaii Public Radio hide caption

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Ryan Finnerty/Hawaii Public Radio

Facing Economic Devastation, Hawaii Attempts To Revive Tourism

Hawaii Public Radio

The tourist economy in Hawaii has been decimated by the pandemic, with 1 in 6 people there unemployed. Now, the state hopes new traveler testing protocols will help bring visitors back to its beaches.

Facing Economic Devastation, Hawaii Attempts To Revive Tourism

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Jason Flom is the CEO of Lava Records, a board member of The Innocence Project and host of the podcast Wrongful Conviction. Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

Jason Flom, The Music Executive With A Nose For Injustice

Though he's guided the careers of pop artists including Lorde, Katy Perry and Skid Row, the Lava Records founder is better known lately for his side gig — bringing aid to the wrongfully convicted.

Jason Flom, The Music Executive With An Ear For Injustice

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Look Inward To Make External Change: Advice From A Meditation Teacher

When the world feels upside-down, it might seem counterintuitive to turn inward to create change. But that's exactly what meditation teacher Sharon Salzberg says we should do.

Look Inward To Make External Change: Advice From A Meditation Teacher

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