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Supporters of Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden sit on top of their vehicles as they listen to him speak at Riverside High School in Durham, N.C., on Sunday afternoon. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Anxious Democrats Don't Trust Biden's Lead. His Campaign Is Fine With That

After 2016, nothing will make Democrats feel secure in the final weeks of a presidential election. For Joe Biden's campaign, which doesn't want voters to be complacent, the anxiety is OK.

Anxious Democrats Don't Trust Biden's Lead. His Campaign Is Fine With That

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A man wears a protective vest with the word Proud Boy at a Portland rally on Sept. 26, 2020. Voters in multiple states received threatening emails purportedly sent by the group, but their true origin remains unknown. Allison Dinner/AP hide caption

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Allison Dinner/AP

Voters In Florida And Alaska Receive Emails Warning 'Vote For Trump Or Else!'

Cybersecurity experts say the origin of the messages remains unknown and may be the product of a foreign disinformation effort.

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A California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection airplane drops fire retardant along a burning hill during the Glass Fire in Calistoga, Calif., in September. California is one of two states to require wildfire risk be disclosed to new homebuyers. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Millions Of Homes Are At Risk Of Wildfires, But It's Rarely Disclosed

Many homeowners who lost everything in a wildfire had no idea they were at risk. Only two states require disclosing wildfire risk to buyers in the house hunting process.

Emergency medical technician Breonna Taylor, 26, was shot and killed by police in her home in March. Her name has become a rallying cry in protests against police brutality and social injustice. Taylor Family hide caption

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Taylor Family

Louisville Police Officer Says Breonna Taylor Shooting Was 'Not A Race Thing'

Taylor's killing, along with that of George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery, sparked national protests calling for an end to systemic racism and police brutality. Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly denied he is racist.

Friederike Seyfried, director of Antique Egyptian Department of the Neues Museum in Berlin, shows media a stain from liquid on the Sarcophagus of the prophet Ahmose on Wednesday. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Dozens Of Artifacts Apparently Vandalized At Berlin's Museums

Police, who believe vandalism to be the cause, are unsure of the motive. German media is speculating a link to a conspiracy theory. The extent of the damage won't be clear until after restoration.

GGN imagines a plan in which the Tidal Basin would be monitored and adjustments — like, perhaps, a walkway over marshy waters — made over the rest of this century. GGN/Tidal Basin Ideas Lab hide caption

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GGN/Tidal Basin Ideas Lab

Landscape Architects Unveil Plans To Save The National Mall's Tidal Basin

With increased car and foot traffic, the ground underneath the Tidal Basin — home to memorials to Thomas Jefferson, FDR and MLK Jr. — is sinking. As sea levels rise, the walkways flood daily.

Left: Luminalt employee Pam Quan installs solar panels on the roof of a home in San Francisco in 2018. Right: An oilfield worker fills his truck with water before heading to a drilling site in the Permian Basin oil field in Andrews, Texas, in 2016. Justin Sullivan and Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan and Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Oil Jobs Are Big Risk, Big Pay. Green Energy Offers Stability And Passion

Workers in the energy sector face two paths: The oil industry offers big salaries but more volatility, while clean energy pays less but provides more stability and a sense of mission.

Protesters chant and sing solidarity songs as they barricade barricade the Lagos-Ibadan expressway on Wednesday to protest against police brutality and the killing of protesters by the military, at Magboro, Ogun State, Nigeria. Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pius Utomi Ekpei/AFP via Getty Images

'Hope Is Lost' As Police Open Fire On Pro-Reform Protesters In Lagos, Nigeria

The protests began about two weeks ago demanding an end to police brutality. Now, as one activist said, "it has become so many things for so many Nigerians." The government declared a 24-hour curfew.

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Steve Wynn speaks to reporters in Massachusetts in 2016, when he still led Wynn Resorts. In 2018, Wynn stepped down from the company after a series of allegations of sexual misconduct, including one allegation of rape. Wynn has denied any wrongdoing. Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

GOP Welcomes Steve Wynn's Millions, Despite Rape And Harassment Allegations

Former casino mogul Steve Wynn has been accused of rape, sexual assault, and harassment. Still, politicians have continued to accept major campaign contributions from Wynn, who has denied wrongdoing.

David Xol of Guatemala hugs his son Byron as they were reunited at Los Angeles International Airport in January. The father and son were separated 18 months earlier under the Trump administration's "no tolerance" migration policy. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

Parents Of 545 Children Separated At U.S.-Mexico Border Still Can't Be Found

A court filing said many of the parents are presumed to no longer be in the United States. Efforts to locate them have been hampered by the coronavirus pandemic, according to the filing.

Karla Monterroso says after going to Alameda Hospital in May with a very accelerated heart rate, very low blood pressure and cycling oxygen levels, her entire experience was one of being punished for being 'insubordinate.' Kenneth Eke/Code2040 hide caption

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Kenneth Eke/Code2040

'All You Want Is To Be Believed': Sick With COVID-19 And Facing Racial Bias In The ER

KQED

When a Latina woman went to a Bay Area hospital, a doctor was dismissive of her COVID symptoms. Is unconscious bias one reason people of color are disproportionately affected by the coronavirus?

Joyce Chen, an associate professor of development economics at the Ohio State University, has had to put her research on hold this year to oversee her children's virtual schooling. Chen is also teaching virtually this fall. Jessica Phelps for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Phelps for NPR

Even The Most Successful Women Pay A Big Price In Pandemic

The unequal division of household work leads to the "mom penalty." For highly educated, high-income women, it could mean losing promotions, future earning power and roles as future leaders.

Even The Most Successful Women Pay A Big Price In Pandemic

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Lil Baby performs a livestreamed concert on Sept. 2, 2020, as part of the Red Rocks Unpaused festival in Colorado. Rich Fury/Getty Images for Visible hide caption

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Rich Fury/Getty Images for Visible

Lil Baby On Taking Music Apart To See 'The Bigger Picture'

The 25-year-old trap titan discusses his songwriting process, his experience in the criminal justice system and why, even as one of the biggest rappers alive, he doesn't believe he's made it just yet.

Lil Baby On Taking Music Apart To See 'The Bigger Picture'

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The University of Michigan football stadium is shown in Ann Arbor, Mich., this summer. Health officials in Michigan say infections among university students account for over 60% of local infections. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

U. Of Michigan Students Under Stay-In-Place Order, But Football Can Still Kick Off

The public health order does not apply to varsity sports such as the football team, which plays University of Minnesota on the road Saturday. The two-week order was prompted by surging virus cases.

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