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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify on Wednesday before the Senate Commerce Committee about a legal shield known as Section 230. Jose Luis Magana, LM Otero, Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana, LM Otero, Jens Meyer/AP

Facebook, Twitter, Google CEOs Testify To Senate: What To Watch For

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, Twitter's Jack Dorsey and Google's Sundar Pichai go before the Senate Commerce Committee to defend Section 230, a law that protects them from lawsuits over users' posts.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., administers the judicial oath to Judge Amy Coney Barrett at the Supreme Court on Tuesday. Barrett's husband, Jesse, holds the Bible. Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States hide caption

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Fred Schilling/Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

A Newly Sworn In Justice Barrett Faces A Motion To Recuse Herself In Election Case

A Pennsylvania county is asking the new justice to disqualify herself because her nomination and confirmation is not only "unprecedented" but linked, by Trump, to his own re-election.

The number of women in the workforce overtook men for a brief period earlier this year. But the uncomfortable truth is that in their homes, women are still fitting into stereotypical roles of doing the bulk of cooking, cleaning and parenting. It's another form of systemic inequality within a 21st century home that the pandemic is laying bare. Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images hide caption

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Malte Mueller/fStop/Getty Images

Stuck-At-Home Moms: The Pandemic's Devastating Toll On Women

Women have made great strides. But the uncomfortable truth is that in their homes, they are still fitting into stereotypical roles of doing the bulk of housework and parenting.

A coal train stops near the White Bluff Plant near Redfield, Ark. in 2014. Entergy Arkansas agreed to eventually stop using coal at this and another plant under a settlement with environmental groups, but a dark money nonprofit funded by Wyoming is pushing to keep them operating. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

Wyoming Is Using Dark Money To Help Keep Coal Plants In Other States Open

Wyoming Public Radio

Wyoming is quietly supporting action elsewhere to preserve its coal-dependent economy. Experts on money in politics say they've never seen this before and find it troubling.

Rhiannon Giddens' new track for Morning Edition's Song Project series describes her feelings of emotional whiplash during the COVID-19 era. Ebru Yildiz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ebru Yildiz/Courtesy of the artist

Rhiannon Giddens Confronts Emotional Whiplash On 'Best Day / Worst Day'

Giddens explains how the new song she composed for Morning Edition's Song Project series grew from this year's extreme ups and downs.

Rhiannon Giddens Confronts Emotional Whiplash On 'Best Day / Worst Day'

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Left: Incumbent Republican Sen. Steve Daines speaks at a manufacturing facility under construction in Bozeman, Mont., in September. Right: Montana Senate candidate Gov. Steve Bullock in 2019. Matthew Brown and Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown and Jose Luis Magana/AP

A Flood Of Outside Money Is Pouring Into 2020 Races, Alarming Transparency Advocates

States such as Montana, Arizona and North Carolina are experiencing a flood of campaign contributions from groups that don't have to reveal where the money's coming from.

A Flood Of Outside Money Is Pouring Into 2020 Races, Alarming Transparency Advocates

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Mark Loughney, Pyrrhic Defeat: A Visual Study of Mass Incarceration, 2014-present. Graphite on paper (series of more than 600 drawings) Mark Loughney hide caption

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Mark Loughney

'Marking Time' And Making Art In Confinement

An exhibition at MoMa PS1 features work created by currently or formerly incarcerated artists and their family members. Curator Nicole R. Fleetwood knows what it's like to love someone on the inside.

'Marking Time' And Making Art In Confinement

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Melissa Trujillo got COVID-19 in June. Four months later, she still suffers from fatigue and headaches. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

COVID-19 Is Weighing Heavily On Arizona Voters. What Will That Mean For Trump?

The presidential race and the balance of power in the U.S. Senate could come down to how the vote goes in this battleground state, which also has among the highest COVID-19 death rates in the nation.

Coronavirus Weighing Heavily On Voters In Arizona

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The Science Behind Worry — And How To Calm Your Nerves

Between the coronavirus and the election, the news is overwhelming right now. Neuroscientist Judson Brewer can help. Take a break from the headlines and press play.

When The Headlines Won't Stop, Here's How To Cope With Anxiety

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J.Stone / Imazins/Getty Images/ImaZinS RF

'Dude, I'm Done': When Politics Tears Families And Friendships Apart

During a bruising political season, many Americans are dropping friends and family members who have different political views. Experts say we should be talking more, not less.

'Dude, I'm Done': When Politics Tears Families And Friendships Apart

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Keith Raniere was sentenced on Tuesday to 120 years in prison for his role as ringleader of the NXIVM cult, where he sexually abused several young women. In this June 2019 courtroom artist's sketch, Raniere, center, sits with his attorneys during closing arguments at federal court in Brooklyn, N.Y. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

NXIVM Cult Leader Sentenced To 120 Years In Prison

Keith Raniere, 60, was convicted last year of sex trafficking, human trafficking and racketeering for his role as the head of the cult. "He robbed me of my youth,'' a victim recounted on Tuesday.

Increasingly, many people in the U.S., like these teens in a Miami grocery story in August, now routinely wear face masks in public to help stop COVID-19's spread. But social distancing and other public health measures have been slower to catch on, especially among young adults, a national survey finds. Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Mask-Wearing Is Up In The U.S., But Young People Are Still Too Lax, CDC Survey Finds

A general increase in mask-wearing has been encouraging, U.S. public health experts say. But too few young people, especially, are social distancing and taking other steps to slow coronavirus' spread.

New videos from Kazakhstan's tourism board turn the fictional journalist Borat's catchphrase "Very nice!" into a slogan to promote the Central Asian country. Kazakhstan Travel/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Kazakhstan Travel/Screenshot by NPR

'Very Nice!': Kazakhstan, Outraged No More, Embraces Borat In New Slogan

The country is welcoming a chance to boost its profile through the new movie featuring the fictional journalist Borat. And as one young Kazakhstani puts it, "This is a parody of American society."

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