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Emmitt Glynn teaches AP African American studies to a group of Baton Rouge Magnet High School students on Jan. 30 in Baton Rouge, La. It was one of 60 schools around the country testing the new course. Stephen Smith/AP hide caption

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Stephen Smith/AP

The College Board revises its new AP African American Studies class after criticism

The official curriculum for the new Advanced Placement course released Wednesday downplays topics like Black Lives Matter that drew criticism from conservatives including Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis.

Mourners left a makeshift memorial outside NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston after the Columbia disaster on Feb. 1, 2003. Brett Coomer/Getty Images hide caption

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Brett Coomer/Getty Images

Twenty years after the Columbia disaster, a NASA official reflects on lessons learned

Seven astronauts died when the Space Shuttle Columbia disintegrated upon reentry on Feb. 1, 2003. NASA Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy looks back on the tragedy and how it shaped the agency.

Twenty years after the Columbia disaster, a NASA official reflects on lessons learned

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As soda consumption has dropped in the West, companies are making an effort to woo new customers in other places. This Coke bottle ad is in Mozambique. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

Junk food companies say they're trying to do good. A new book raises doubts

As the marketing of soda and fast food ramps up around the world, the companies involved forge partnerships to help the poor. The new book 'Junk Food Politics' casts a critical eye at their efforts.

Vice President Harris (center) marches across the Edmund Pettus Bridge on March 6, 2022, in Selma, Ala., to commemorate the 57th anniversary of Bloody Sunday. Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images

It's Black History Month. Here are 3 things to know about the annual celebration

The annual celebration started out in 1926 as Negro History Week and expanded to Black History Month in the 1970s. This year's theme is "Black Resistance."

Six students share their stories of how the COVID-19 pandemic defined their high school experiences (clockwise from top left): Hector Flores, Alyssa Lanum, Kathryn Barto, Destiny Torres, Adam Raynard and Sasha Martell. Open Campus/NPR hide caption

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Open Campus/NPR

The 'guinea pig' generation: How the pandemic shaped this year's college freshmen

Open Campus Media

COVID-19 defined the high school experiences of many students entering college this fall. "I went from 16 to 18 in a blur," says one freshman.

Longtime University of California women's swimming coach Teri McKeever (shown here in June 2012 while serving as U.S. Olympic team head coach) was fired on Tuesday following an investigation into alleged harassment, bullying and verbally abusive conduct, the school said in a statement. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

The University of California fires swim coach Teri McKeever over misconduct allegations

Teri McKeever led the school to four NCAA team titles and is the first woman to coach the U.S. Olympic women's swim team. The school cited violations of anti-discrimination policies and verbal abuse.

President Joe Biden, right, talks with Rep. Kevin McCarthy of Calif., left, after an event in the Rose Garden of the White House in July 26, 2021. The president and the House speaker are preparing for their first official visit at the White House on Wednesday, ahead of a looming debt crisis. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Biden and McCarthy set to meet to talk about the debt ceiling stalemate

President Biden and House Speaker Kevin McCarthy will meet Wednesday to discuss, among other things, how to avoid a default on the U.S. debt.

A banner of Russian President Vladimir Putin is seen during a protest to support the Burkina Faso President Captain Ibrahim Traore and to demand the departure of France's ambassador and military forces, in Ouagadougou, on Jan. 20, 2023. Russia has been trying to expand its influence throughout Africa in recent years. Olympia de Maismont/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olympia de Maismont/AFP via Getty Images

A pro-Russian social media campaign is trying to influence politics in Africa

Researchers have identified a large network pushing pro-Russian themes and messages to French-speaking audiences around Africa, amid long-running efforts by Russia to gain influence in the region.

A sign calling attention to drug overdoses is posted in a gas station on the White Earth reservation in Ogema, Minn.. A new study shows that early deaths due to addiction and suicide have impacted American Indian and Alaska Native communities far more than white communities. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

Native Americans are left out of 'deaths of despair' research

During the time that deaths from addiction and suicide among white Americans rose by about 9%, deaths among Native Americans shot up by about 30%, a new study shows.

Native Americans left out of 'deaths of despair' research

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Patrick Shiroishi — pictured here in Los Angeles — released 19 albums in 2022; at least three were standouts in their respective fields, in part because of the questions of identity they examine. Sean Hazen for NPR hide caption

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Sean Hazen for NPR

Patrick Shiroishi's music moves a Japanese American saga forward

The saxophonist and composer resisted his Japanese American heritage for decades. He now funnels that painful and triumphant personal history into a string of vital records.

Sabrina Kronk and her daughter Katie. During a time when Kronk said she was worried about finances, a group of mechanics helped the family of two out by providing free parts and labor to fix their SUV. Sabrina Kronk hide caption

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Sabrina Kronk

A newly single mom wasn't sure she could make ends meet. They threw her a lifeline

Sabrina Kronk was worried about providing for her daughter Katie. When their car broke down she was nervous about the financial implications. Then she got some help from some unexpected friends.

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A meal prep influencer shares 6 of his favorite cooking hacks

What's for dinner? It's a question that can lead to overspending on delivery, unhealthy meals and dread. FitMenCook founder Kevin Curry shares meal prep techniques that can alleviate stress and save money.

A meal prep influencer shares 6 of his favorite cooking hacks

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New York state records show nearly half the state's 600-plus nursing homes hired real estate, management and staffing companies run or controlled by their owners, frequently paying them well above the cost of services. Meanwhile, in the pandemic's height, the federal government was giving the facilities hundreds of millions in fiscal relief. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption

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Maskot/Getty Images

Nursing home owners drained cash while residents deteriorated, state filings suggest

Kaiser Health News

As the U.S. government debates whether to require higher staffing levels at nursing homes, financial records show some owners routinely push profits to sister companies while residents are neglected.

Anti-coup protesters hold up signs as they march in Mandalay, Myanmar Sunday, March 14, 2021. The prospects for peace in Myanmar, much less a return to democracy, seem dimmer than ever two years after the army seized power from the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi, experts say. AP hide caption

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AP

Resistance to military rule in Myanmar remains steady 2 years after army seized power

Opponents of Myanmar's military rule heeded a call on Wednesday by organizers to stay home in a "silent strike" as the prospects for peace in the country seem dim 2 years after the army seized power.

A fisherman throws a cast net along shore of Lake Mead at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Jan. 27, 2023, near Boulder City, Nev. Six western states that rely on water from the Colorado River agreed on a plan to cut their use. California, the state with the largest allocation of water from the river, offered its own plan. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

National

After 6 states agree on a proposal for Colorado River cutbacks, California counters

KUNC

California has the largest and oldest water rights in the region. It held out when six other states that use water from the Colorado River agreed on a proposal to leave more water in Lake Mead.

Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR

What kind of perfectionist are you? Take this 7-question quiz to find out

Are you a 'Parisian perfectionist'? How about a 'messy perfectionist'? Psychotherapist Katherine Morgan Schafler believes there are 5 kinds of perfectionists in the world. Find out which one you are.

What kind of perfectionist are you? Take this 7-question quiz to find out

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