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A migrant family waits in Tijuana, Mexico, before being transported to the San Ysidro port of entry to begin the process of applying for asylum in the United States. A new U.S. rule would bar Central American migrants from applying for asylum at the U.S. southern border. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Trump Administration Implementing '3rd Country' Rule On Migrants Seeking Asylum

Immigrants who want to seek asylum at the U.S. southern border must first apply for refugee status in another country, according to a new rule that is set to take effect Tuesday.

James Fields Jr. killed a woman after he drove a car into a group of protesters in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017. On Monday, a judge in Virginia sentenced him to life in prison. Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via Getty Images hide caption

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Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via Getty Images

Neo-Nazi James Fields Gets 2nd Life Sentence For Charlottesville Attack

The Virginia court's sentence is largely symbolic. Last month, a federal judge sentenced Fields to life in prison for killing a woman protesting a white nationalist rally in 2017.

The Danish company Maersk has been shipping goods around the world since the age of steamships. Now it wants to usher in a new era, with zero-carbon transport. David Hecker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Hecker/Getty Images

Giant Shipper Bets Big On Ending Its Carbon Emissions. Will It Pay Off?

Maersk, the world's largest container shipping company, has set a massive goal for itself: going carbon neutral by 2050. This would be good for the world. But how would it be good for the bottom line?

Emily Nussbaum received the most hate mail of her career after she panned season 1 of HBO's True Detective. "Most of it was handwritten," she says. C. Clive Thompson/Penguin Random House hide caption

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C. Clive Thompson/Penguin Random House

We All Watch In Our Own Way: A Critic Tracks The 'TV Revolution'

New Yorker TV critic Emily Nussbaum won't appear on panels pitting TV against movies or books. "Everything is valuable in its own way and they don't need to be in tension with one another," she says.

Democrats are hopeful they can mobilize a religious left to counter the religious right. But it's unclear whether that outreach will resonate with voters who make up the religious middle. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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A-Digit/Getty Images

Democrats Have The Religious Left. Can They Win The Religious Middle?

Faith voters who have a mix of liberal and conservative values are up for grabs in the 2020 election. Democrats hope to win them over.

Democrats Have The Religious Left. Can They Win The Religious Middle?

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Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota speaks to supporters at the Polish Princess Bakery in Lancaster, N.H. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

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Tamara Keith/NPR

Nominating Judges Is A Top Priority For Klobuchar, But She Isn't Naming Names

New Hampshire Public Radio

Despite pressure from the right and the left to do so, Sen. Amy Klobuchar argues she can't share her preferences without the vetting available to a president.

Nominating Judges Is A Top Priority For Klobuchar, But She Isn't Naming Names

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Taking care of a newborn can be relentless and at some point, many parents need the baby to sleep — alone and quietly — for a few hours. So what does science say about the controversial practice of sleep training? Scott Bakal for NPR hide caption

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Scott Bakal for NPR

Sleep Training Truths: What Science Can (And Can't) Tell Us About Crying It Out

Some parents swear by it. They say it's the only way they and their babies get any sleep. Others parents say it's harmful. So what does the science say? Here we separate fiction from fact.

Sleep Training Truths: What Science Can (And Can't) Tell Us About Crying It Out

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Protesters against gerrymandering at a March 2019 rally coinciding with Supreme Court hearings on major redistricting cases. After the court said the federal judiciary has no role in partisan redistricting cases, legal action is focused on state courts. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

North Carolina Gerrymandering Trial Could Serve As Blueprint For Other States

North Carolina Public Radio – WUNC

The case has the potential to significantly alter how political maps are established in North Carolina while serving as a blueprint for legal challenges in other states.

North Carolina Gerrymandering Trial Could Serve As Blueprint For Other States

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Tyler Holland guides his bike through the water as winds from Tropical Storm Barry push water from Lake Pontchartrain over the seawall Saturday. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

A Weakened Tropical Depression Barry Creeps North, But Heavy Rain Remains A Concern

Forecasters estimate rainfall over south-central Louisiana at about 6 to 12 inches, and isolated maximum rainfall could reach up to 20 inches, posing potential "dangerous, life-threatening flooding."

Tomas Rodriguez/Getty Images/Picture Press RM

Simple Ways To Prevent Falls In Older Adults

Older adults are dying from falls at a higher rate today than 20 years ago. But you can take simple steps to improve balance, vision and alertness — and keep from falling.

Simple Ways To Prevent Falls In Older Adults

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Augusta Savage was an artist, educator, activist and community leader. Her work is the focus of an exhibition at the New-York Historical Society, organized by the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens. She's pictured above with her 1938 sculpture Realization. New-York Historical Society hide caption

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New-York Historical Society

Sculptor Augusta Savage Said Her Legacy Was The Work Of Her Students

Savage was an artist, an educator, an activist and a community leader. Born on Feb. 29, 1892, Savage once said, "I was a Leap Year baby, and it seems to me that I have been leaping ever since."

Sculptor Augusta Savage Said Her Legacy Was The Work Of Her Students

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"If you want to make a diaspora of things, you need to reach to a diaspora of people," GoldLink says. Josh Brasted/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Brasted/Getty Images

GoldLink Talks 'Diaspora' And The Global Future Of Music

GoldLink joined All Songs Considered from the BBC in London to discuss his latest album, Diaspora, rapid gentrification in D.C. and what he's learned about the universal black experience.

GoldLink Talks 'Diaspora' And The Global Future Of Music

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